Croatia Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 by City Immigrants

Last Modified: August 18, 2017 at 1:26 pm

Croatia Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017

The demographic characteristics of the population of CroatiaCroatia Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 are known through censuses, normally conducted in ten-year intervals and analysed by various statistical bureaus since the 1850s. The Croatian Bureau of Statistics has performed this task since the 1990s. The latest census in Croatia was performed in April 2011. The permanent population of Croatia at the 2011 census had reached 4.29 million. The population density is 75.8 inhabitants per square kilometre, and the overall life expectancy in Croatia at birth was 78 years in 2012. The population rose steadily (with the exception of censuses taken following the two world wars) from 2.1 million in 1857 until 1991, when it peaked at 4.7 million. Since 1991, Croatia's death rate has continuously exceeded its birth rate; the natural growth rate of the population is negative. Croatia is in the fourth or fifth stage of the demographic transition. In terms of age structure, the population is dominated by the 15- to 64-year-old segment. The median age of the population is 41.4, and the gender ratio of the total population is 0.93 males per 1 female.

 

 

Croatia demographics Population by Religion

Religion in Croatia (2011 census)

  Roman Catholicism (86.28%)

  Eastern Orthodoxy (4.44%)

  Irreligion (3.81%)

  Others (3.66%)

  Islam (1.47%)

  Protestantism (0.34%)

 


  Croatia demographics Population by Immigrants

The demographic history of Croatia is characterised by significant migrations, starting with the arrival of the Croats in the area. According to the work De Administrando Imperio written by the 10th-century Byzantine Emperor Constantine VII, the Croats arrived in the area of modern-day Croatia in the early 7th century. However, that claim is disputed, and competing hypotheses date the event between the 6th and the 9th centuries. Following the establishment of a personal union of Croatia and Hungary in 1102, and the joining of the Habsburg Empire in 1527, the Hungarian and German speaking population of Croatia began gradually increasing in number. The processes of Magyarization and Germanization varied in intensity but persisted to the 20th century. The Ottoman conquests initiated a westward migration of parts of the Croatian population; the Burgenland Croats are direct descendants of some of those settlers. To replace the fleeing Croats the Habsburgs called on the Orthodox populations of Bosnia and Serbia to provide military service in the Croatian Military Frontier. Serb migration into this region peaked during the Great Serb Migrations of 1690 and 1737–39. Similarly, Venetian Republic rule in Istria and in Dalmatia, following the Fifth and the Seventh Ottoman–Venetian Wars ushered gradual growth of Italian speaking population in those areas. Following the collapse of Austria-Hungary in 1918, the Hungarian population declined, especially in the areas north of the Drava river, where they represented the majority before World War.


  Croatia demographics Population by Race
.

Religion in Croatia

Religion

Percent

Roman Catholicism

86.28%

Eastern Orthodoxy

4.44%

Islam

1.47%

Protestantism

0.34%

Atheism or Agnosticism

4.57%

Others and unspecified

3.24%

 Croatia Population by City
.

S.No.

Name

Population

1

Zagreb 

698,966

2

Split 

176,314

3

Rijeka

141,172

4

Osijek

88,140

5

Zadar

71,258

6

Slavonski Brod

60,742

7

Pula

59,078

8

Sesvete 

52,411

9

Karlovac, Karlovacka

48,123

10

Karlovac 

46,833

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