Trump Shows Early-Vote Strength in Ohio Iowa, Early Voting Trends Results US Presidential Elections 2016, US Presidential Early Election Results 2016, US Election Results, US state wise election results, US early voting trends, US early voting pattern, Democrats or republicans in early voting, Clinton or trump in early voting

Last Modified: November 8, 2016 at 5:46 am

Trump Shows Early-Vote Strength in Ohio Iowa, Early Voting Trends Results US Presidential Elections 2016, US Presidential Early Election Results 2016, US Election Results, US state wise election results, US early voting trends, US early voting pattern, Democrats or republicans in early voting, Clinton or trump in early voting

 

Nearly 2 Millions Americans have already voted as of October 25, and early voting is showing Hillary Clinton going stronger than trump. In 2012, 129 million US Voters took part in the elections. Early Voting would go on till 4th November.

LIVE Highlights and Updates of US Presidential Election 2016:

  1. Hillary Clinton wins early vote in tiny New Hampshire town by a 4-2 margin over Donald Trump.

Results till now show.

  1. Clinton sees surge in swing states of North Carolina, Nevada
  2. As many as four in 10 voters expected to cast ballots early
  3. Democrats doing better than what they did in 2012 in states like North Carolina, Nevada, Colorado, Arizona and Utah.
  4. Trump is holding steady in Ohio, Iowa, and Georgia
  5. Polls show Hillary is running closer than expected in Texas
  6. Democrats and Republicans are running close in Florida, which is a good sign for Democrats as Republicans have good hold in Florida.
Early voting in battlegrounds where data is available (as of Nov. 3)
  Total mail
and early
vote
Total mail
and early
vote
Percent Democrat Percent Republican
State 2012 2016 2016 2016
Colorado 2090426 1406573 36.2 35.2
Florida 4789212 4867113 39.8 40
Iowa 688005 557432 43.5 34.4
Nevada 705052 622073 42.3 36.9
North Carolina 2774599 2337899 42.7 31.8
Source: United States Elections Project Bloomberg

Key County

The Ohio county where Trump held his national convention in July is presenting the greatest concern for Democrats so far. Clinton needs to generate a large advantage in Cuyahoga, home to Cleveland and a Democratic stronghold that’s the state’s most populous county, to offset Republican votes elsewhere. In 2012, Obama won by 256,613 votes in Cuyahoga, part of a statewide margin of 166,272.

Early-vote requests by Democrats in Cuyahoga County, however, are down 35 percent compared with the same point in 2012, and ballots returned are off by 31 percent, according to data from the county board of elections. Republicans are running slightly ahead.

The voting in Cuyahoga, Republicans say, shows a lack of enthusiasm for Clinton and that spells trouble for her, in part because 30 percent of county residents are black, a key Democratic voting bloc.

Democrats say it’s misleading to compare this year with 2012 because there are five fewer days of early voting. They say in-person and voting by mail numbers are increasing — and there’s still a final weekend of in-person voting, when churches organize “souls to the polls” efforts.

Running Behind

But Democrats are running slightly behind the number of accepted in-person and mail ballots cast at the same point in the 2012 election — in which Obama lost the state to Republican Mitt Romney by 2 percentage points — while Republicans are running 13 percent ahead, according to J. Michael Bitzer, a political-science professor at Catawba College in Salisbury.

Turnout by blacks is also down by 11 percent, compared with an increase of 20 percent for whites, in part because voting changes by the Republican-controlled legislature and governor that limited the number of polling sites during the first week of early voting, Bitzer said.

While black voters are making steady headway in eating into their deficit compared to 2012, early in-person voting ends on Saturday. The question will be whether Democrats shift to getting more black voters to show up on Election Day, he said.

Another variable this year is a 44 percent increase from 2012 so far in early ballots cast by unaffiliated voters, the fasting-growing bloc in the state, Bitzer said. Almost 40 percent of all registered voters under the age of 35 are unaffiliated, he said.

Both Clinton and Trump campaigned in North Carolina on Thursday, and Obama was there on Wednesday, saying the “fate of the world is teetering and you, North Carolina, are going to have to make sure that we push it in the right direction.’’

Republicans say they are pleased with early voting trends. They think Democrats will struggle to match Obama’s performance in early balloting, while they’ll exceed what Romney did four years ago.

“The momentum is definitely with Mr. Trump right now,” Chris Carr, the Republican National Committee’s political director, told reporters earlier this week.

Source: bloomberg.com

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