Chinese Legislative Council Macau voting live Results Dates Opinion Exit Poll Candidates

Chinese Legislative Council Macau voting live Results

Chinese Legislative Council (Macau) election Dates 2017

Chinese Legislative Council (Macau) Date: 17 September 2017

The Legislative Assembly  is the organ of the legislative branch of Macau. It is a 33-member body comprising 14 directly elected members, 12 indirectly elected members representing functional constituencies and 7 members appointed by the chief executive. It is located at Sé.

It is also known in English as the Legislative Council of Macao, according to the official translation of the territory's basic law.

Chinese Legislative Council (Macau) 2017 voting live Results

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Chinese Legislative Council (Macau) election Voting Live 2017

 

  1. The election of the Millennium Legislative Assembly of China's Macao Special Administrative Region (SAR) kicked off on Sunday morning, with more than 300,000 registered voters expected to cast their ballots in polling stations.
  2. Thougands of voters went to polling stations ahead of the official voting time of 9 am (0100 GMT) on Sunday. The polling will wrap up at 9 pm (1300 GMT) in the same day.
  3. In line with the provisions of the Basic Law, the sixth legislature will be composed of 33 seats – 14 directly-elected seats,
  4. There are a total of 307,020 eligible voters in direct election, up 11.23 percent from the previous election in 2013.
  5. The 859 legal person voters, up by 19.47 percent from the previous election in 2013, will vote in indirect election
  6. A total of 186 candidates will run for the 14 directly-elected seats, while 15 candidates from six vocational groups will run or the 12
  7. There are 42 polling homes setting up in all districts for voters 'convenience, based on voters' permanent residence address.
  8. To ensure the voting rights of residents who are serving their terms of imprisonment, the authorities also set up a polling station in the Macao Prison.
  9. Under Macao's law on voter registration, only permanent residents of Macao aged 18 and above have the right to vote.
  10. According to the Basic Law of Macau, the number of directly elected legislators has increased from 10 to 12 in 2005, bringing the number of legislators to 29. After 2009, the selection of the Chief Executive may be changed by ⅔ endorsement of the Legislative Assembly and approval by the National People's Congress(NPC) Standing Committee.
  11. To change the method for forming the Legislative Assembly require a ⅔ endorsement of the assembly, agreement by the Chief Executive, and notification to the NPC Standing Committee. Civic organisations in Macau are not well-developed. The ability of Macau residents to change their government is significantly restricted.
  12. The members of Executive Council are appointed by the Chief Executive from among principal officials (heads of department, informally called "ministers"), members of Legislative Council, and public figures. Their appointment and removal is decided by the Chief Executive. There is no fixed term of office, but the term of office of members cannot extend beyond the expiry of that of the Chief Executive who appoints them.

 


Electoral system of Macau

The Chief Executive of Macau is appointed by the People's Republic of China's central government after selection by an election committee, whose members are nominated by corporate bodies. The chief executive appears before a cabinet, the Executive Council, of between 7 and 11 members. The term of office of the chief executive is 5 years, and no individual may serve for more than two consecutive terms. The governor has strong policymaking and executive powers similar to those of a president. These powers are, however, limited from above by the central government in Beijing, to whom the governor reports directly, and from below (to a more limited extent) by the legislature.

In May 1999, Edmund Ho, a community leader and banker, was the first PRC-appointed chief executive of the Macau SAR, having replaced General de Rocha Viera on 20 December 1999. He was elected by the 200-member Chief Executive Selection Committee. Ho, born in Macau in 1955, was the first Chinese person to govern the region since the 1550s. Prior to 20 December 1999, Ho nominated major officials in the new government and carried out other transfer tasks. Ho was re-elected for a second term in 2004 and was succeeded by Fernando Chui in 2009.


Candidates for Chinese Legislative Council (Macau) 2017

N/A


Macau Parties and leaders

  • Union for Development
  • United Citizens Association of Macau
  • Union for Promoting Progress
  • Macau-Guangdong Union
  • Alliance for Change
  • New Union for Macau's Development
  • Macau Business Interest Union
  • Employees Association Joint Candidature Commission
  • Macau professional Interest Union
  • Association for Promotion of Social Services and Education
  • Excellent Culture and Sports Union Association
  • New Macau Association
  • New Democratic Macau Association

     

     

    • Prosperous Democratic Macau Association
    • New Macau Liberals
  • New Hope
  • Civil Watch
  • Association for Together Efforts to Improve the Community
  • Activism for Democracy Association
  • Democratic Society Alliance
  • Association for Promotion of Civic Rights
  • Macau Ideals
  • Innovative Action
  • Supervision by the Lower Class
  • Workers' Movement Front

Macau past election results

Summary of the 15 September 2013 Legislative Assembly of Macau election results

 

Political affiliation

Popular votes

% of Votes

Change in
% of vote

Seats

Net change
in seats

13

 

United Citizens Association of Macau (ACUM)

26,385

18.02

Increase6.02

3

Increase1

8

 

Macau-Guangdong Union (UMG)

16,248

11.09

Increase3.79

2

Increase1

14

 

Union for Promoting Progress(UPP)

15,816

10.80

Increase0.90

2

Increase1

9

 

New Hope (NE)

13,118

8.96

Decrease0.14

2

Increase1

1

 

New Union for Macau’s Development (NUDM)

13,086

8.94

Decrease1.00

1

Steady

6

 

Union for Development (UPD)

11,961

8.17

Decrease6.71

1

Decrease1

19

 

Prosperous Democratic Macau Association[nb 1] (APMD)

10,986

7.50

Decrease4.08

1

Decrease1

5

 

New Democratic Macau Association[nb 1] (ANMD)

8,826

6.03

Decrease1.74

1

Steady

12

 

Alliance for Change (Mudar)

8,755

5.98

Increase0.44

1

Steady

 

7

 

Civil Watch (Cívico)

5,524

3.57

Decrease0.19

0

Steady

20

 

Caring Macau (CPM)

5,323

3.63

N/A

0

Steady

2

 

New Macau Liberals[nb 1] (LNM)

3,227

2.20

N/A

0

Steady

11

 

Association for Together Efforts to Improve the Community (MAC)

2,306

1.57

N/A

0

Steady

18

 

Innovative Action (AI)

1,641

1.12

N/A

0

Steady

10

 

Macau Ideals (IM)

1,006

0.69

N/A

0

Steady

3

 

Activism for Democracy Association (AAPD)

923

0.63

N/A

0

Steady

4

 

Association for Promotion of Civic Rights (APDC)

848

0.58

N/A

0

Steady

16

 

Supervision by the Lower Class(SPCB)

368

0.25

N/A

0

Steady

15

 

Workers' Movement Front (MO)

227

0.15

N/A

0

Steady

17

 

Democratic Society Alliance(ALDES)

179

0.12

N/A

0

Steady

Total and Turnout

151,881

100

 

14

Increase2

Valid votes

146,453

96.42

     

Invalid votes

1,083

0.72

     

Blank votes

4,345

2.86

     

Eligible voters

276,034

       

Functional constituencies and appointed members

 

Macau Business Interest Union(OMKC)

     

4

Steady

 

Employees Association Joint Candidature Commission(CCCAE)

     

2

Steady

 

Macau professional Interest Union(OMCY)

     

3

Increase1

 

Association for Promotion of Social Services and Education(APSSE)

     

1

Increase1

 

Excellent Culture and Sports Union Association (União Excelente)

     

2

Steady

 

Members appointed by the Chief Executive

     

7

Steady

 

Nepal Provincial Parliamentary election 2017 voting live Results Dates Opinion Exit Poll Candidates

Nepal Provincial Parliamentary election 2017 voting live Results Dates

Nepal Provincial Parliamentary election Dates 2017

Nepal Provincial Parliamentary election Date: 26 November 2017

 The House of Representatives (Nepali: Pratinidhi Sabha) was the lower house of parliament during the 1990 Constitution in Nepal. It consisted of 205 members directly elected by the people. It had five-year terms, but it could be dissolved by the king on the advice of the prime minister before the ending of its term.

The Pratinidhi Sabha was provisioned by the Constitution of the Kingdom of Nepal 1990 in October 1990. According to which the parliament was formed by the General Election held in April 1991.House of Representatives of Nepal election 2017 Voting live Results

 

 

 

 

 


Nepal Provincial Parliamentary election Voting Live 2017

  1. Legislative elections will be held in Nepal in two phases on 26 November 2017 and 7 December 2017 to elect members of the House of Representatives, the lower house of the Federal Parliament.
  2. The tenure of the current Legislature Parliament ends on 21 January 2018 and if the parliament is not in place by then, the country will be without a legislature.

     

     


    Electoral system of Nepal

The 275 members of the legislature will be elected by two methods; 165 will be elected from single-member constituencies by first-past-the-post voting and 110 seats will be elected by closed listproportional representation from a single nationwide constituency.A party or electoral alliance must pass the election threshold of 3% of the overall valid vote to be allocated a seat under the proportional method.The candidate who obtains the support of majority of the members will become the next Prime Minister.

A five-member Constituency Delineation Commission was formed under the chairmanship of former Supreme Court Justice Kamal Narayan Das to redraw the constituency boundaries to 165, a reduction from the 240 used in the 2013 elections. It submitted its report to the government on 30 August. The boundaries set by this commission will remained unchanged for the next 20 years as per Article 286 (12).


Candidates for Nepal Provincial Parliamentary

Leader

Sher Bahadur Deuba

Khadga Prasad Oli

Party

Nepali Congress

CPN (UML)


Nepal Parties and leaders

Party

Nepali Congress

Communist Party of Nepal (Unified Marxist–Leninist)

Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist Centre)

Rastriya Prajatantra Party

Rastriya Janata Party Nepal

Nepal Loktantrik Forum

Sanghiya Samajvadi Forum, Nepal

Communist Party of Nepal (Marxist–Leninist)

Nepal Mazdoor Kisan Party

Rastriya Janamorcha

Communist Party of Nepal (United)

Nepal Pariwar Dal

Naya Shakti Party, Nepal

Akhanda Nepal Party

Nepali Janata Dal

Khambuwan Rashtriya Morcha, Nepal

Bouddhik Prajatantrik Parishad

Jana Jagaran Party Nepal

Samajvadi Janata Party

Sanghiya Loktantrik Rastriya Manch (Tharuhat)

Bahujan Shakti Party

Rastriya Janamukti Party


Nepal past election results

Party

FPTP

Proportional

Total
seats

+/–

Votes

%

Seats

Votes

%

Seats

Nepali Congress

2,694,983

29.80

105

2,418,370

25.55

91

196

81

Communist Party of Nepal (Unified Marxist–Leninist)

2,492,090

27.55

91

2,239,609

23.66

84

175

67

Unified Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist)

1,609,145

17.79

26

1,439,726

15.21

54

80

149

Rastriya Prajatantra Party Nepal

252,579

2.79

0

630,697

6.66

24

24

20

Madhesi Jana Adhikar Forum, Nepal (Loktantrik)

283,468

3.13

4

274,987

2.91

10

14

14

Rastriya Prajatantra Party

238,313

2.63

3

260,234

2.75

10

13

5

Madhesi Jana Adhikar Forum, Nepal

206,110

2.28

2

214,319

2.26

8

10

44

Tarai-Madhesh Loktantrik Party

171,889

1.90

4

181,140

1.91

7

11

10

Sadbhavana Party

140,930

1.56

1

133,271

1.41

5

6

3

Communist Party of Nepal (Marxist–Leninist) (2002)

98,091

1.08

0

130,300

1.38

5

5

4

Federal Socialist Party

108,683

1.20

0

121,274

1.28

5

5

5

Rastriya Janamorcha

66,666

0.74

0

92,387

0.98

3

3

1

Communist Party of Nepal (United)

24,808

0.27

0

91,997

0.97

3

3

2

Rashtriya Madhesh Samajwadi Party

76,392

0.84

0

79,508

0.84

3

3

3

Nepal Workers Peasants Party

54,323

0.60

1

66,778

0.71

3

4

1

Rastriya Janamukti Party

39,352

0.44

0

63,834

0.67

2

2

 

Terai Madhes Sadbhavana Party

65,047

0.72

1

62,746

0.66

2

3

3

Tharuhat Tarai Party Nepal

38,972

0.43

0

62,526

0.66

2

2

2

Nepal Pariwar Dal

14,546

0.16

0

51,823

0.55

2

2

1

Dalit Janajati Party

33,508

0.37

0

48,802

0.52

2

2

1

Akhanda Nepal Party

12,590

0.14

0

36,883

0.39

1

1

1

Madeshi Janadikar Forum (Gantantrik)

35,289

0.39

0

33,982

0.36

1

1

1

Nepali Janata Dal

6,816

0.08

0

33,203

0.35

1

1

1

Khambuwan Rashtriya Morchan Nepal

6,451

0.07

0

30,686

0.32

1

1

1

Nepa Rastriya Party

9,377

0.10

0

28,011

0.30

1

1

 

Jana Jagaran Party Nepal

3,510

0.04

0

27,397

0.29

1

1

1

Sanghiya Sadhbhawana Party

20,395

0.23

0

25,215

0.27

1

1

1

Madhesh Samata Party Nepal

8,130

0.09

0

23,001

0.24

1

1

1

Samajwadi Janata Party

4,661

0.05

0

21,624

0.23

1

1

1

Sanghiya Loktantrik Rastriya Manch (Tharuhat)

4,622

0.05

0

21,128

0.22

1

1

1

Independents

107,764

1.19

2

2

0

Total

9,044,908

100

240

9,463,862

100

335

26

601

Chinese Legislative Council (Macau) voting live Results Dates Opinion Exit Poll Candidates

Chinese Legislative Council (Macau) election 2017 Results Voting Live Dates Opinion Exit Poll

Chinese Legislative Council (Macau) election Dates 2017

Chinese Legislative Council (Macau) Date: 17 September 2017

The Legislative Assembly (AL; Portuguese: Assembleia Legislativa; Traditional Chinese: 立法會; Simplified Chinese: 立法会) is the organ of the legislative branch of Macau. It is a 33-member body comprising 14 directly elected members, 12 indirectly elected members representing functional constituencies and 7 members appointed by the chief executive. It is located at Sé.

It is also known in English as the Legislative Council of Macao, according to the official translation of the territory's basic law.

Chinese Legislative Council (Macau) 2017 voting live Results

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Chinese Legislative Council (Macau) election Voting Live 2017

  1. According to the Basic Law of Macau, the number of directly elected legislators has increased from 10 to 12 in 2005, bringing the number of legislators to 29. After 2009, the selection of the Chief Executive may be changed by ⅔ endorsement of the Legislative Assembly and approval by the National People's Congress(NPC) Standing Committee.
  2. To change the method for forming the Legislative Assembly require a ⅔ endorsement of the assembly, agreement by the Chief Executive, and notification to the NPC Standing Committee. Civic organisations in Macau are not well-developed. The ability of Macau residents to change their government is significantly restricted.
  3. The members of Executive Council are appointed by the Chief Executive from among principal officials (heads of department, informally called "ministers"), members of Legislative Council, and public figures. Their appointment and removal is decided by the Chief Executive. There is no fixed term of office, but the term of office of members cannot extend beyond the expiry of that of the Chief Executive who appoints them.

Electoral system of Macau

The Chief Executive of Macau is appointed by the People's Republic of China's central government after selection by an election committee, whose members are nominated by corporate bodies. The chief executive appears before a cabinet, the Executive Council, of between 7 and 11 members. The term of office of the chief executive is 5 years, and no individual may serve for more than two consecutive terms. The governor has strong policymaking and executive powers similar to those of a president. These powers are, however, limited from above by the central government in Beijing, to whom the governor reports directly, and from below (to a more limited extent) by the legislature.

In May 1999, Edmund Ho, a community leader and banker, was the first PRC-appointed chief executive of the Macau SAR, having replaced General de Rocha Viera on 20 December 1999. He was elected by the 200-member Chief Executive Selection Committee. Ho, born in Macau in 1955, was the first Chinese person to govern the region since the 1550s. Prior to 20 December 1999, Ho nominated major officials in the new government and carried out other transfer tasks. Ho was re-elected for a second term in 2004 and was succeeded by Fernando Chui in 2009.


Candidates for Chinese Legislative Council (Macau) 2017

N/A


Macau Parties and leaders

  • Union for Development
  • United Citizens Association of Macau
  • Union for Promoting Progress
  • Macau-Guangdong Union
  • Alliance for Change
  • New Union for Macau's Development
  • Macau Business Interest Union
  • Employees Association Joint Candidature Commission
  • Macau professional Interest Union
  • Association for Promotion of Social Services and Education
  • Excellent Culture and Sports Union Association
  • New Macau Association
  • New Democratic Macau Association

    • Prosperous Democratic Macau Association
    • New Macau Liberals
  • New Hope
  • Civil Watch
  • Association for Together Efforts to Improve the Community
  • Activism for Democracy Association
  • Democratic Society Alliance
  • Association for Promotion of Civic Rights
  • Macau Ideals
  • Innovative Action
  • Supervision by the Lower Class
  • Workers' Movement Front

Macau past election results

Summary of the 15 September 2013 Legislative Assembly of Macau election results

 

Political affiliation

Popular votes

% of Votes

Change in
% of vote

Seats

Net change
in seats

13

 

United Citizens Association of Macau (ACUM)

26,385

18.02

Increase6.02

3

Increase1

8

 

Macau-Guangdong Union (UMG)

16,248

11.09

Increase3.79

2

Increase1

14

 

Union for Promoting Progress(UPP)

15,816

10.80

Increase0.90

2

Increase1

9

 

New Hope (NE)

13,118

8.96

Decrease0.14

2

Increase1

1

 

New Union for Macau’s Development (NUDM)

13,086

8.94

Decrease1.00

1

Steady

6

 

Union for Development (UPD)

11,961

8.17

Decrease6.71

1

Decrease1

19

 

Prosperous Democratic Macau Association[nb 1] (APMD)

10,986

7.50

Decrease4.08

1

Decrease1

5

 

New Democratic Macau Association[nb 1] (ANMD)

8,826

6.03

Decrease1.74

1

Steady

12

 

Alliance for Change (Mudar)

8,755

5.98

Increase0.44

1

Steady

 

7

 

Civil Watch (Cívico)

5,524

3.57

Decrease0.19

0

Steady

20

 

Caring Macau (CPM)

5,323

3.63

N/A

0

Steady

2

 

New Macau Liberals[nb 1] (LNM)

3,227

2.20

N/A

0

Steady

11

 

Association for Together Efforts to Improve the Community (MAC)

2,306

1.57

N/A

0

Steady

18

 

Innovative Action (AI)

1,641

1.12

N/A

0

Steady

10

 

Macau Ideals (IM)

1,006

0.69

N/A

0

Steady

3

 

Activism for Democracy Association (AAPD)

923

0.63

N/A

0

Steady

4

 

Association for Promotion of Civic Rights (APDC)

848

0.58

N/A

0

Steady

16

 

Supervision by the Lower Class(SPCB)

368

0.25

N/A

0

Steady

15

 

Workers' Movement Front (MO)

227

0.15

N/A

0

Steady

17

 

Democratic Society Alliance(ALDES)

179

0.12

N/A

0

Steady

Total and Turnout

151,881

100

 

14

Increase2

Valid votes

146,453

96.42

     

Invalid votes

1,083

0.72

     

Blank votes

4,345

2.86

     

Eligible voters

276,034

       

Functional constituencies and appointed members

 

Macau Business Interest Union(OMKC)

     

4

Steady

 

Employees Association Joint Candidature Commission(CCCAE)

     

2

Steady

 

Macau professional Interest Union(OMCY)

     

3

Increase1

 

Association for Promotion of Social Services and Education(APSSE)

     

1

Increase1

 

Excellent Culture and Sports Union Association (União Excelente)

     

2

Steady

 

Members appointed by the Chief Executive

     

7

Steady

 

Singapore Presidential election 2017 Dates Schedule Candidates

Singapore Presidential election 2017 Dates Schedule Candidates

Singaporean presidential election 2017 Date September 2017

The next Singaporean presidential election is due to be held on or before September 2017.

Election Could most probably be conducted on Saturday, Sept. 23, 2017. Polling Day is normally on a Saturday to avoid distrupting work life So Polling Day will be one of these days: Sept. 9, 16, 23 or 30.

The President is the head of state of Singapore. Following the Westminster system, the position is largely ceremonial, but enjoys several reserve powers including withholding presidential assent on supply bills and changing or revoking civil service appointments.The current system of holding elections for the Presidency began with the 1993 election. Before then, the President was selected by Parliament.
There are strict requirements for prospective election candidates, and whether a candidate meets the qualifications or not is decided by the Election Department.  The Presidency is, by the rules of the Constitution, nonpartisan.


Singaporean presidential election Candidates 2017 

A Constitutional Commission is reviewing the eligibility criteria for presidential candidates.
With the changes to elected presidency, it will be reserved for Malay community.

Confirmed Candidated For Singaporean Presidential Elections 2017.

Presidential hopeful Mohamed Salleh Marican submitted his app. forms on Wed (Aug 23).

Farid Khan Kaim Khan, is the chairman of Bourbon Offshore Asia Pacific, a leading offshore oil and gas marine provider in the region, and founder of Bumi Subsea, an undersea operation firm. He also sits on the Careers@Maritime Steering Committee – an initiative supported by the Maritime & Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) that aims to grow awareness about jobs in the maritime industry.However, Bourbon Offshore Asia Pacific reportedly has a shareholders' equity value of US$300 million, which falls short of the S$500 million required to automatically qualify as an eligible candidate.


Mohamed Salleh Marican, founding chairman and CEO of 2nd Chance Properties, the first company owned by a Malay/Muslim to be listed in Singapore.Mr Salleh said "I believe I have done well for myself in business and would like to step up and give back to society in a much larger way" and that he "can also fulfill the call of most Singaporeans who desire a truly independent Elected President, one who is untainted by party politics". However, Mr. Salleh's company only has a registered shareholder equity S$254.3-263.23 million over the last three financial years, which falls short of the S$500 million needed to automatically qualify as an eligible candidate.

 


Shirwin Eu, a private-hire driver who had failed to contest in the 2015 general election and the 2016 Bukit Batok SMC by-election as an independent candidate said, “I understand that this is a reserved election for minorities, for Malay candidates, but the verdict is not out yet… I think there’s always a chance for the government to review its intentions. I am not sure if the Malay community wants to do that because there may be some repercussions and setbacks to it.”In addition to not being a member of the Malay community, Mr Eu also fails to meet any of the qualifying criteria, namely that one must hold a high-level civil service post or be the chairperson or CEO of a company with a shareholders' equity of S$500 million or more.  Mr Eu has also criticise the election being reserved for Malays, claiming that since "mathematics is the poorer subject for the Malay community", members of the Malay community are unable to "scrutinise the SWF, the Temasek and GIC"

Halimah Yacob, the former Speaker of Parliament, has confirmed that she is running for the Elected Presidency, and has resigned from her positions as Speaker of Parliament and MP of Marsiling-Yew Tee GRC, and from her membership in the PAP, on 7 August 2017. She is viewed as the PAP's candidate for the election, and was reported to have been considering the candidacy for three weeks prior to her announcement. Speaking after a community event in her constituency of Marsiling-Yew Tee, Halimah said, “I am thinking about it, of running for the presidency.The elected presidency is a very heavy responsibility and an important institution in Singapore, so it’s not something that one should take lightly. so it needs a bit of time to think. But I must say at this moment, I have a lot of duties I have to perform, as Speaker, as MP. These duties are also very dear and important to me.” Halimah has served as Speaker of Parliament for more than 3 years since 14 January 2013, fulfilling a key qualifying criterion to run for President under the Singapore Constitution.

 

Bahren Shaari, CEO of Bank of Singapore, does not rule out the possibility that he will run for the election. He said, “at the moment, my focus is on growing the business of Bank of Singapore with my team and deriving the synergies from our recent acquisition of the wealth and investment management business of Barclays Bank PLC.” He added, “I’m humbled to have my name mentioned as a potential candidate. It is always a privilege and honour to serve the nation.” Mr Bahren was appointed as an alternate member of the Council of Presidential Advisers (CPA) on 6 April 2017.


 

Singaporean presidential election results 2011

 

 
Candidate Symbol Results
Votes % of valid votes
Tony Tan Keng Yam Spectacles-SG2001-transparent.png 745,693 35.20
Tan Cheng Bock Traveller's palm logo, Singaporean presidential election, 2011.svg 738,311 34.85
Tan Jee Say Heart-SG2001-transparent.png 530,441 25.04
(Loses deposit) Tan Kin Lian Hand-SG2001-transparent.png 104,095 4.91
Valid votes 2,118,540 98.24% of total votes cast
Invalid (e.g. blank or spoiled) votes 37,849 1.76% of total votes cast
Total votes cast 2,156,389 Voter turnout: 94.8% of electorate
Did not vote 118,384
Electorate 2,274,773

 

North Korean president Kim Jong-un USA Trump Latest News Update

North Korean president Kim Jong-un USA Trump Latest News Update

North Korean President Kim Jong-un Born:  8 January 1984  (American records)Kim Jong-un biography
5 July 1984  (Swiss records)

Kim Jong-un was born on 8 January 1984 or 5 July 1984)is the Chairman of the Workers' Party of Korea (WPK) and supreme leader of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), commonly referred to as North Korea. Kim is the second child of Kim Jong-il (1941–2011) and his consort Ko Yong-hui. Little is known for certain about Kim Jong-un. Before taking power, he had barely been seen in public, and many of the activities of both Kim and his government remain shrouded in secrecy. Even details such as what year he was born, and whether he did indeed attend a Western school under a pseudonym, are difficult to confirm with certainty.


Kim was officially declared the supreme leader following the state funeral of his father on 28 December 2011. Kim holds the titles of Chairman of the Workers' Party of Korea, Chairman of the Central Military Commission, Chairman of the National Defence Commission, Supreme Commander of the Korean People's Army, and presidium member of the Politburo Standing Committee of the Workers' Party of Korea.
Kim was promoted to the rank of Marshal of North Korea in the Korean People's Army on 18 July 2012, consolidating his position as the Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces and is often referred to as Marshal Kim Jong-un or "the Marshal" by state media. Kim obtained two degrees, one in physics at Kim Il-sung University, and another as an Army officer at the Kim Il-sung Military University.

North Korean president Kim Jong-un USA Trump Latest News

  1. The US military released pictures of supersonic B-1B bombers flying from Guam after North Korea threatened to strike an American airbase on the remote Pacific island.
  2. Two US Air Force B-1B jets took part in 10-hour mission over the Korean peninsula just hours before Kim Jong-un revealed his plans.
  3. France calls on North Korea and US to 'act responsibly'
  4. US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Trump is sending a strong message to North Korea “in a language Kim Jong-un would understand”.
  5. China has urged for ‘calm’ after North Korea said it was considering plans for a missile strike on the US Pacific territory of Guam.
  6. US President Donald Trump said any threat to his country would be met with “fire and fury”.

North Korean president Kim Jong-un Family Education

Personal details

 

 

Born (1984-01-08) 8 January 1984 (age 33)
  (American records)
  (1984-07-05) 5 July 1984 (age 32)
  (Swiss records)
  Pyongyang, Democratic People's Republic of Korea
Nationality North Korean
Political party Workers' Party of Korea
Spouse(s) Ri Sol-ju
Children Kim Ju-ae
Alma mater Kim Il-sung University
  Kim Il-sung Military University
  HELP University (honorary)
Signature  
Military service  
Allegiance  North Korea
Years of service 2010–present
Rank Marshal of the Republic
Commands Supreme Commander

 North Korean President Kim Jong-un Family 

On 25 July 2012 North Korean state media reported for the first time that Kim Jong-un is married to Ri Sol-ju (리설주). Ri, who appears to be in her early 20s, had been accompanying Kim Jong-un to public appearances for several weeks prior to the announcement. According to a South Korean analyst, Kim Jong-il had hastily arranged the marriage after suffering a stroke in 2008, the two married in 2009, and they had a child in 2010. Dennis Rodman, after visiting in 2013, reported that they had a daughter named Ju-ae. However, South Korean sources speculated that they could have many children.
Kim's younger sister Kim Yo-jong sometimes accompanies him and is said to be instrumental in creating his public image and organising public events for him.

On 13 February 2017, Kim Jong-nam, the exiled half-brother of Kim Jong-un, was assassinated with the nerve agent VX while walking through Terminal 2 at Kuala Lumpur International Airport


North Korean Leader Kim Jong-un Education

Scarce information on Kim Jong-un's early life comes from North Korean defectors and people who have claimed to witness him abroad, such as during his school attendance in Switzerland. Some of the information has been conflicting and contradictory, perhaps confusing him with his brother, Kim Jong-chul, who also attended school in Switzerland around the same time. Nevertheless, there has been some consensus on information about his early life. North Korean authorities have stated that his birthdate is 8 January 1982, but South Korean intelligence officials believe the actual date is a year later. Former basketball star Dennis Rodman said that the birthdate is 8 January 1983 after meeting Kim in September 2013 in North Korea. Kim Jong-Un was the second of three children Ko Yong-hui bore to Kim Jong-il; his elder brother Kim Jong-chul was born in 1981, while his younger sister, Kim Yo-jong, is believed to have been born in 1987.


According to reports first published in Japanese newspapers, he went to school in Switzerland near Bern. First reports claimed he attended the private English-language International School in Gümligen under the name "Chol-pak" or "Pak-chol" from 1993 to 1998. He was described as shy, a good student who got along well with his classmates and was a basketball fan. He was chaperoned by an older student, who was thought to be his bodyguard.
All the children of Kim Jong-il are said to have lived in Switzerland, as well as the mother of the two youngest sons, who lived in Geneva for some time.Most analysts agree that Kim Jong-un attended Kim Il-sung University, a leading officer-training school in Pyongyang, from 2002 to 2007.


North Korean Leader Kim Jong-un Policies News Updates

Under Kim Jong-un, North Korea has continued to develop nuclear weapons. At a plenary meeting of the WPK Central Committee held on 31 March 2013, Kim Jong-un announced that North Korea will adopt "a new strategic line on carrying out economic construction and building nuclear armed forces simultaneously". According to several analysts, North Korea sees the nuclear arsenal as vital to deter an attack, and it is unlikely that North Korea would launch a nuclear war. During the 7th Congress of the Workers' Party of Korea in 2016, Kim Jong-un stated that North Korea would "not use nuclear weapons first unless aggressive hostile forces use nuclear weapons to invade on our sovereignty". However, on other occasions, North Korea has threatened "pre-emptive" nuclear attacks against a US-led attack
In August 2012, Kim Jong-un announced economics reforms similar to China. Kim began to be mentioned by the North Korean state media as "supreme leader" (chego ryongdoja) at this time

Malaysian General election results 2017 live Voting Dates Opinion Exit Poll Candidates

Malaysian General election results 2017 live Voting Dates Opinion Exit Poll Candidates

Malaysia General election Dates 2017

Malaysia General election Date: 10 October 2017

The 14th Malaysian general election (GE14) will elect members of the 14th Parliament of Malaysia on or before 24 August 2018. The 13th Parliament of Malaysia will automatically dissolve on 24 June 2018. The first meeting of the first session of the 13th Parliament of Malaysia was held on 24 June 2013. Find Malaysian General election results 2017 live Voting Dates Opinion

Malaysia Map

 

 

 

Malaysia General Parliamentary election Upates 2017

 

The 222 members of the Dewan Rakyat are elected from single-member constituencies using the first-past-the-post voting system. Malaysia does not practice compulsory voting and automatic voter registration. The voting age is 21 although the age of majority in the country is 18. The redelineation of electoral boundaries for the entire country are expected to be completed before the next general election. Elections are conducted by the Election Commission, which is under the jurisdiction of the Prime Minister's Department.

 

 

 

 


 

Malaysia Presidential election Contesting Parties and Candidates

Leader

 

Najib Razak Wan Azizah Abdul Hadi Awang
Party Barisan Nasional Pakatan Harapan Gagasan Sejahtera
Leader since 39906 42142 37460
Leader's seat Pekan Permatang Pauh Marang
Last election 133 seats, 47.38% 68 seats, 36.1% 21 seats, 14.78%
    (Pakatan Rakyat) (Pakatan Rakyat)
Current seats 132 74 14
Seats needed   38 98

 

 

 

 

 

Malaysia General Parliamentary election Opinion Poll Party Wise 

 

sources: wikipedia.org

 

Singapore Presidential election 2017 Candidates List Name Party

Singapore Presidential election 2017 Candidates List Name Party

Singaporean presidential election 2017 Date Septemner 2017

The next Singaporean presidential election is due to be held on or before September 2017.

The President is the head of state of Singapore. Following the Westminster system, the position is largely ceremonial, but enjoys several reserve powers including withholding presidential assent on supply bills and changing or revoking civil service appointments.The current system of holding elections for the Presidency began with the 1993 election. Before then, the President was selected by Parliament.
There are strict requirements for prospective election candidates, and whether a candidate meets the qualifications or not is decided by the Election Department.  The Presidency is, by the rules of the Constitution, nonpartisan.

 

Singaporean presidential election Candidates 2017

A Constitutional Commission is reviewing the eligibility criteria for presidential candidates.
With the changes to elected presidency, it will be reserved for Malay community.

Confirmed Candidated For Singaporean Presidential Elections 2017.

Presidential hopeful Mohamed Salleh Marican submitted his app. forms on Wed (Aug 23).

Farid Khan Kaim Khan, is the chairman of Bourbon Offshore Asia Pacific, a leading offshore oil and gas marine provider in the region, and founder of Bumi Subsea, an undersea operation firm. He also sits on the Careers@Maritime Steering Committee – an initiative supported by the Maritime & Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) that aims to grow awareness about jobs in the maritime industry.However, Bourbon Offshore Asia Pacific reportedly has a shareholders' equity value of US$300 million, which falls short of the S$500 million required to automatically qualify as an eligible candidate.
Mohamed Salleh Marican, founding chairman and CEO of 2nd Chance Properties, the first company owned by a Malay/Muslim to be listed in Singapore.Mr Salleh said "I believe I have done well for myself in business and would like to step up and give back to society in a much larger way" and that he "can also fulfill the call of most Singaporeans who desire a truly independent Elected President, one who is untainted by party politics". However, Mr. Salleh's company only has a registered shareholder equity S$254.3-263.23 million over the last three financial years, which falls short of the S$500 million needed to automatically qualify as an eligible candidate.


Shirwin Eu, a private-hire driver who had failed to contest in the 2015 general election and the 2016 Bukit Batok SMC by-election as an independent candidate said, “I understand that this is a reserved election for minorities, for Malay candidates, but the verdict is not out yet… I think there’s always a chance for the government to review its intentions. I am not sure if the Malay community wants to do that because there may be some repercussions and setbacks to it.”In addition to not being a member of the Malay community, Mr Eu also fails to meet any of the qualifying criteria, namely that one must hold a high-level civil service post or be the chairperson or CEO of a company with a shareholders' equity of S$500 million or more.  Mr Eu has also criticise the election being reserved for Malays, claiming that since "mathematics is the poorer subject for the Malay community", members of the Malay community are unable to "scrutinise the SWF, the Temasek and GIC"

Halimah Yacob, the former Speaker of Parliament, has confirmed that she is running for the Elected Presidency, and has resigned from her positions as Speaker of Parliament and MP of Marsiling-Yew Tee GRC, and from her membership in the PAP, on 7 August 2017. She is viewed as the PAP's candidate for the election, and was reported to have been considering the candidacy for three weeks prior to her announcement. Speaking after a community event in her constituency of Marsiling-Yew Tee, Halimah said, “I am thinking about it, of running for the presidency.The elected presidency is a very heavy responsibility and an important institution in Singapore, so it’s not something that one should take lightly. so it needs a bit of time to think. But I must say at this moment, I have a lot of duties I have to perform, as Speaker, as MP. These duties are also very dear and important to me.” Halimah has served as Speaker of Parliament for more than 3 years since 14 January 2013, fulfilling a key qualifying criterion to run for President under the Singapore Constitution.

 

Bahren Shaari, CEO of Bank of Singapore, does not rule out the possibility that he will run for the election. He said, “at the moment, my focus is on growing the business of Bank of Singapore with my team and deriving the synergies from our recent acquisition of the wealth and investment management business of Barclays Bank PLC.” He added, “I’m humbled to have my name mentioned as a potential candidate. It is always a privilege and honour to serve the nation.” Mr Bahren was appointed as an alternate member of the Council of Presidential Advisers (CPA) on 6 April 2017.


 

Singaporean presidential election results 2011

 

 
Candidate Symbol Results
Votes % of valid votes
Tony Tan Keng Yam Spectacles-SG2001-transparent.png 745,693 35.20
Tan Cheng Bock Traveller's palm logo, Singaporean presidential election, 2011.svg 738,311 34.85
Tan Jee Say Heart-SG2001-transparent.png 530,441 25.04
(Loses deposit) Tan Kin Lian Hand-SG2001-transparent.png 104,095 4.91
Valid votes 2,118,540 98.24% of total votes cast
Invalid (e.g. blank or spoiled) votes 37,849 1.76% of total votes cast
Total votes cast 2,156,389 Voter turnout: 94.8% of electorate
Did not vote 118,384
Electorate 2,274,773

 

Mongolian Presidential election results 2017 Area Subdivision Votes % live Voting Dates Opinion Exit Poll Candidates

Mongolian Presidential election results 2017 Area Subdivision

Mongolia Presidential election Dates 2017

Mongolia Presidential election Date: 26 June 2017

On June 26 2017, more than 2,050,000 Mongolians will be electing a new president. Mongolians living abroad will vote at embassies and consulates on June 10/11.

Incumbent Pres. Ts Elbegdorj will not be running for re-election as he has been president for two terms. Only parties represented in the Ikh Khural can nominate candidates which implies a two-way race between an MPP and a DP-nominated candidate, though the MPRP may also nominate a candidate. The General Election Commission will announce candidates before May 17

 

 


Mongolia Presidential election Results Live 2017

Khaltmaa Battulga of the opposition Democratic Party (DP), a 54-year-old former world champion in the Soviet martial art Sambo, had 50.7 per cent of the vote with 87 per cent of ballots counted, according to the General Election Commission.

Battulga, 54, had 50.8 percent of the vote at 12:30 a.m. local time on Saturday compared to 40.6 percent of the vote for MPP candidate Enkhbold Miyegombo, with 92 percent of polling stations reporting

Candidate

 

Party First round Second round
    Votes % Votes %
Khaltmaagiin Battulga DP 517478 38.64 611226 55.15
Miyeegombyn Enkhbold MPP 411748 30.75 497067 44.85
Sainkhüügiin Ganbaatar MPRP 409899 30.61    
Invalid/blank votes   18663 99494
Total   1357788 100 1207787 100
Registered voters/turnout 1978298 68.27 1990787 60.67
 

Mongolia Election Results 2017 by Area Division

Subdivision K. Battulga M. Enkhbold
  DP   MPP  
Aimags of Mongolia        
Arkhangai 16763 47.43% 15559 43.91%
Bayan-Ölgii 16201 42.11% 21306 55.38%
Bayankhongor 23085 64.65% 11944 33.45%
Bulgan 11568 49.95% 9360 40.42%
Govi-Altai 8334 40.51% 10793 52.46%
Dornogovi 11657 44.86% 12456 47.93%
Govisümber 2764 42.13% 3331 50.77%
Dornod 13535 51.52% 10271 39.09%
Dundgovi 6420 36.93% 8243 47.42%
Zavkhan 14632 48.99% 13993 46.85%
Övörkhangai 20209 48.46% 19001 45.57%
Ömnögovi 10258 48.14% 8412 39.48%
Sükhbaatar 11628 48.51% 10860 45.31%
Selenge 18381 44.16% 20032 48.12%
Töv 14562 40.22% 19192 53.01%
Uvs 12172 39.23% 17367 55.97%
Khovd 13135 44.10% 14451 48.52%
Khövsgöl 24135 49.20% 21550 43.93%
Khentii 14452 53.75% 9658 35.92%
Darkhan-Uul 16496 45.54% 16154 44.59%
Orkhon 20042 53.78% 12452 33.41%
Düüreg of Ulaanbaatar        
Khan-Uul 38047 56.19% 23476 34.67%
Baganuur 5193 47.71% 4791 44.02%
Bagakhangai 682 36.73% 1108 59.67%
Bayanzürkh 75765 55.11% 49030 35.66%
Nalaikh 6979 45.52% 7068 46.10%
Sükhbaatar 32634 55.60% 20717 35.30%
Chingeltei 34807 54.02% 23382 36.29%
Bayangol 51596 58.63% 29102 33.07%
Songino Khairkhan 64272 50.87% 50343 39.85%
         
Overseas 2030 75.86% 497 18.57%
         
Total 611226 50.61% 497067 41.16%
 
 
Electoral system of Mongolia

Elections in Mongolia gives information on elections and election results inMongolia.

Mongolia elects its head of state—the President of Mongolia—at the national level. The president is elected for a four-year term by the people, using the Two-round system. The State Great Khural (Ulsyn Ikh KhuralState Great Assembly) has 76 members, originally elected for a four-year term from single-seat constituencies. Due to the voting system, Mongolia experienced extreme shifts in the composition of the parliament after the 1996, 2000, and 2004 elections, so it has changed to a more proportional system in which some seats are filled on the basis of votes for local candidates, and some on the basis of nationwide party preference totals. Beginning in 2008, local candidates were elected from 26 electoral districts. Beginning with the 2012 elections, a parallel system was enacted, combining a district part and a nationwide proportional part. 48 seats are chosen at the local level in 26 districts with 1-3 seats usingPlurality-at-large voting. 28 seats are chosen from nationwide closed party listsusing the Largest remainder method. In the district seats, a candidate is required to get at least 28% of the vote cast in a district to be elected. If there are seats that are not filled due to this threshold, a runoff election is held in the respective district with twice the number of representatives as there are seats to be filled, between the top vote-getters of the first round.[


Candidates for Presidential election 2017

  • Nambaryn Enkhbayar – Mongolian People's Revolutionary Party – former President (2005–2009) and current leader of the MPRP
  • Miyeegombyn Enkhbold – Mongolian People's Party – MP, former Prime Minister of Mongolia (2006–2007), current Speaker of the State Great Khuraland current leader of the MPP
  • Khaltmaa Battulga – Democratic Party – former MP

                        Mongolia Parties and leaders

  • Brief history of MPRP, MPP, MNDP, MSDP, DU, MDP, PCW.
  • Mongolia People's Revolutionary Party, before 2010.
  • Mongolian People's Revolutionary Party, since 2011.
  • Mongolia People's Party.
  • Motherland Democratic Coalition.
  • Motherland Party.
  • Democratic Party.
  • Mongolian Social Democratic Party ("old" MSDP and "new" MSDP reg. in 2005)

Mongolia Presidential election Results

 Summary of the 26 June 2013 Mongolian presidential election results

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj

Democratic Party

622,794

50.89

Badmaanyambuugiin Bat-Erdene

Mongolian People's Party

520,380

42.52

Natsagiin Udval

Mongolian People's Revolutionary Party

80,563

6.58

Invalid/blank votes

13,688

Total

1,239,784

100

Registered voters/turnout

1,864,273

66.50

Mongolian Presidential election results 2017 live Voting Dates Opinion Exit Poll Candidates

Mongolian Presidential election results 2017 live Voting

Mongolia Presidential election Dates 2017

Mongolia Presidential election Date: 26 June 2017

On June 26 2017, more than 2,050,000 Mongolians will be electing a new president. Mongolians living abroad will vote at embassies and consulates on June 10/11.

Incumbent Pres. Ts Elbegdorj will not be running for re-election as he has been president for two terms. Only parties represented in the Ikh Khural can nominate candidates which implies a two-way race between an MPP and a DP-nominated candidate, though the MPRP may also nominate a candidate. The General Election Commission will announce candidates before May 17

 

 


Mongolia Presidential election Results Live 2017

Khaltmaa Battulga of the opposition Democratic Party (DP), a 54-year-old former world champion in the Soviet martial art Sambo, had 50.7 per cent of the vote with 87 per cent of ballots counted, according to the General Election Commission.

Battulga, 54, had 50.8 percent of the vote at 12:30 a.m. local time on Saturday compared to 40.6 percent of the vote for MPP candidate Enkhbold Miyegombo, with 92 percent of polling stations reporting

Candidate

 

Party First round Second round
    Votes % Votes %
Khaltmaagiin Battulga DP 517478 38.64 611226 55.15
Miyeegombyn Enkhbold MPP 411748 30.75 497067 44.85
Sainkhüügiin Ganbaatar MPRP 409899 30.61    
Invalid/blank votes   18663 99494
Total   1357788 100 1207787 100
Registered voters/turnout 1978298 68.27 1990787 60.67

Mongolian Presidential election results 2017 by Area Subdivision

Electoral system of Mongolia

Elections in Mongolia gives information on elections and election results inMongolia.

Mongolia elects its head of state—the President of Mongolia—at the national level. The president is elected for a four-year term by the people, using the Two-round system. The State Great Khural (Ulsyn Ikh KhuralState Great Assembly) has 76 members, originally elected for a four-year term from single-seat constituencies. Due to the voting system, Mongolia experienced extreme shifts in the composition of the parliament after the 1996, 2000, and 2004 elections, so it has changed to a more proportional system in which some seats are filled on the basis of votes for local candidates, and some on the basis of nationwide party preference totals. Beginning in 2008, local candidates were elected from 26 electoral districts. Beginning with the 2012 elections, a parallel system was enacted, combining a district part and a nationwide proportional part. 48 seats are chosen at the local level in 26 districts with 1-3 seats usingPlurality-at-large voting. 28 seats are chosen from nationwide closed party listsusing the Largest remainder method. In the district seats, a candidate is required to get at least 28% of the vote cast in a district to be elected. If there are seats that are not filled due to this threshold, a runoff election is held in the respective district with twice the number of representatives as there are seats to be filled, between the top vote-getters of the first round.[


Candidates for Presidential election 2017

  • Nambaryn Enkhbayar – Mongolian People's Revolutionary Party – former President (2005–2009) and current leader of the MPRP
  • Miyeegombyn Enkhbold – Mongolian People's Party – MP, former Prime Minister of Mongolia (2006–2007), current Speaker of the State Great Khuraland current leader of the MPP
  • Khaltmaa Battulga – Democratic Party – former MP

                        Mongolia Parties and leaders

  • Brief history of MPRP, MPP, MNDP, MSDP, DU, MDP, PCW.
  • Mongolia People's Revolutionary Party, before 2010.
  • Mongolian People's Revolutionary Party, since 2011.
  • Mongolia People's Party.
  • Motherland Democratic Coalition.
  • Motherland Party.
  • Democratic Party.
  • Mongolian Social Democratic Party ("old" MSDP and "new" MSDP reg. in 2005)

Mongolia Presidential election Results

 Summary of the 26 June 2013 Mongolian presidential election results

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj

Democratic Party

622,794

50.89

Badmaanyambuugiin Bat-Erdene

Mongolian People's Party

520,380

42.52

Natsagiin Udval

Mongolian People's Revolutionary Party

80,563

6.58

Invalid/blank votes

13,688

Total

1,239,784

100

Registered voters/turnout

1,864,273

66.50

Nepalese Local Second Phase elections 2017 Results live Voting Candidate Winners Opinion Poll

Nepalese Local Second Phase elections 2017 Results live Voting

Nepalese Local elections Dates 2017 

National Local Second Phase elections Date: 28 June 2017 

The 2017 Nepalese Local Second Phase elections will be held on Thursday 28 June 2017.

Second phase of elections are to be held in 41 districts in Provinces 1, 2, 5 and 7

Local elections are scheduled to be held in Nepal on 28 June 2017 in 4 metropolitan cities, 13 sub-metropolitan cities, 241 municipalities and 486 village councils. They are the first Local elections for 20 years and the first to be held since the promulgation of the 2015 constitution.

 


 

Nepalese Second Phase Local elections Results Live 2017 

Nepali Congress Leading on 18 Seats; Others-10, CPN-UML-8

Nepal on Monday went to local elections to elect 136 local bodies in Province no 2, for the final phase of local polls. The counting of votes has begun and Maoist Centre is leading on one seat.

In 1st phase, 3 provinces clock 71 % voter turnout according to the Election Commission.

Results will be updated soon for the 3 Provinces and 34 Districts for First phase of nepalese Local elections. Second phase is to be conducted on 14 June 2017.

Mayor/Chairperson results

Province 1

 

   
Party Win Lead
CPN-UML 12 47
Nepali Congress 6 50
Maoist Kendra 3 7
Others 0 3
Rastriya Prajatantra Party 0 1
Province 5    
Party Win Lead
Maoist Kendra 8 9
CPN-UML 4 37
Nepali Congress 4 28
Others 2 8
Rastriya Prajatantra Party 0 3
Province 7    
     
Party Win Lead
Nepali Congress 13 22
CPN-UML 13 16
Maoist Kendra 2 10
Others 0 3
Rastriya Prajatantra Party 0 1
Province 3    
     
Party Win  
CPN-UML 64  
Nepali Congress 35  
Maoist Kendra 16  
Others 2  
Rastriya Prajatantra Party 1  
Province 4    
Party Win  
Nepali Congress 44  
CPN-UML 34  
Maoist Kendra 5  
Others 2  
Rastriya Prajatantra Party 0  
Province 6    
Party Win  
CPN-UML 27  
Nepali Congress 25  
Maoist Kendra 25  
Others 2  
Rastriya Prajatantra Party 0  
Total    
     
Party Win Lead
CPN-UML 154 101
Nepali Congress 127 100
Maoist Kendra 59 26
Others 8 14
Rastriya Prajatantra Party 1 5

 

Read Detailed Nepal Municipality Elections Results here

 

Read Nepal Deputy Municipal Elections Results here


Nepalese Local elections Facts 2017 


Provinces – 3
Districts – 34
Local Units – 283
Polling Locations – 3923
Polling Centres – 6641
Total no of voters – 4,956,927
Municipalities – 92
Village councils – 186

Mayoral and Chairperson Positions
Men – 1723
Women – 157

Deputy Mayoral and chairperson position
Men – 257
women – 1123

Ward Chairperson position
Men – 10,296
women – 448

Ward Member Position
Men – 17,729
Women – 951


Nepalese Local elections Voting Live 2017

Nepalese Local elections will take place on sunday morning 7 am.

  1. Polling stations open from 7am to 5pm on Sunday , May 14.

Nepal Local Elections About 2017 by Council

Local elections were held in 56 municipalities in February 2006 under King Gyanendra but were boycotted by the major political parties and saw low voter turnout. Prior to 2006, the previous elections was held in 1997 with a mandate of five years. Elections were supposed to be held on 2002 but were delayed due to the then ongoing Nepal Civil War.


With the promulgation of the new constitution in 2015, a three-tier governance system was introduced, with national, provincial and Local levels of governance. A Local Body Restructuring Commission was established as required by the constitution under the chairmanship of Balananda Paudel. The commission proposed 719 Local structures which was revised to 744 by the government. The new Local levels were formed by changing the existing cities and village development council and came into existence on 10 March 2017

 

  Choice
Metropolitan City One Mayor, One Deputy Mayor, One Ward Chairman, 4 Ward members
Sub Metropolitan City One Mayor, One Deputy Mayor, One Ward Chairman, 4 Ward members
Municipality One Mayor, One Deputy Mayor, One Ward Chairman, 4 Ward members
Village Council One Chairman, One Deputy Chairman, One Ward Chairman, 4 Ward members

 

 


Electoral system of Nepalese

Each Local level will have a Chairman/Mayor and a Deputy chairman/mayor. Local levels are further subdivided into wards which will have a ward chairman and 4 members. Out of the 4 members 2 must be female. All terms are for a total of 5 years. The elections are direct in nature and with the one getting the most ballots is declared the winner

 


Candidates for Local elections 2017

N/A

 

Nepalese Parties and leaders

Leader
Sher Bahadur Deuba
KP Oli
Prachanda
Party
Nepali Congress
Communist Party of Nepal (Unified Marxist-Leninist)
Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist-Centre)

 

Nepalese Local elections Results 2012

Nepal elections

1 2 3 4 8