Afghanistan parliamentary election Result 2016 Schedule Candidates Opinion Exit poll, Afghan parliamentary election Result 2016, Afghanistan parliamentary election dates winner 2016

Afghanistan parliamentary election Result 2016 Schedule Candidates Opinion Exit poll, Afghan parliamentary election Result 2016, Afghanistan parliamentary election dates winner 2016

Afghanistan parliamentary election 2016 Schedule

Parliamentary elections will be held in Afghanistan on 15 October 2016,to elect members of the House of the People. Much of the prelude to the election has focused on the debate over reforming Afghanistan's electoral laws. The current system is one of single non-transferable vote.

Afghanistan parliamentary election result 2016 Live Here:

Leader Party Last Election
Salahuddin Rabbani Jamiat-e Islami 17
Mohammad Mohaqiq PIUPA 11
Abdul Rashid Dostum Junbish 10
Election For Date Votes Regd. Voters Turnout
House of People 15 Oct 2016 TBD TBD TBD
House of People 18 Sep 2016 4,216,594 10,300,000 40.94%

 

  • Chief of State: President Mohammad Ashraf GHANI
  • Head of Government: President Mohammad Ashraf GHANI*
  • Assembly: Afghanistan has a bicameral National Assembly (Jirga) consisting of the House of Elders (Meshrano Jirga) with 102 seats and the House of People (Wolesi Jirga) with 249 seats.

*The runner-up, Dr. Abdullah Abdullah, currently shares power with President Ghani as the Chief Executive Officer of Afghanistan, a newly created extra-constitutional position.  

Description of electoral system:

  • The President is elected by absolute majority vote through a two-round system to serve a 5-year term.
  • In the House of Elders (Meshrano Jirga), 34 members are elected by regional legislatures to serve 4-year terms, 34 members are elected by regional legislatures to serve 3-year terms and 34 members are appointed by the President to serve 5-year terms. In the House of People (Wolesi Jirga) 249 members are elected by single non-transferable vote to serve 5-year terms.

Population (as of May 18, 2015): 31,822,848

Fallout from 2014 Presidential election

Most of the problems have centered around pre-existing disputes within Afghanistan's coalition government between the two main candidates from the 2014 Presidential election. The overhaul of the Afghan electoral system prior to a new parliamentary election was a key part of the post-election power-sharing deal reached between President Mohammad Ashraf Ghani and Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah. Whilst both agree in not holding an election before the process is overhauled, there is disagreement on how to proceed and who should oversee the process. Ghani's recommendation of Shukria Barakzai for the post was rejected by Abdullah, who saw her as being too close to Ghani. Simultaneously Abdullah has also been strongly opposed to the same officials overseeing the election as oversaw the 2014 Presidential election, due in part to the widespread belief that Ghani benefited from the 2014 elections irregularities compared to Abdullah. Tying into this is the fact that no officials from the election have been charged with any crime or removed.In contrast to Abdullah's more hardline calls for total overhaul, Ghani's supporters have been more supportive of more limited reforms.

 

Thailand to hold election in 2017: PM Prayuth Chan-ocha, Thai election 2017, draft charter, Thailand general election 2017 Schedule dates, Thailand referendum result, junta

Thailand to hold election in 2017: PM Prayuth Chan-ocha, Thai election 2017, draft charter, Thailand general election 2017 Schedule dates, Thailand referendum result, junta

Thailand's army ruler today said the country would hold a general election next year as planned following the approval in a referendum of a new junta-backed Constitution that gives the military sweeping powers. 

Prime Minister Gen Prayut Chan-O-Cha's announcement came after voters approved the draft charter in Sunday's referendum vote.


Prayut did not comment on the referendum result but said the poll process would happen in 2017 as planned. 

"Please have confidence in the roadmap. I've never said otherwise," the prime minister said. 

Speaking to reporters, he dismissed a suggestion that the polls could be postponed to 2018. 

"Let's count today as Day 1 on the roadmap schedule. If you follow the roadmap it would put us at November 2017 when the whole process is complete. So why would the elections be held in 2018?" he said. 
Under the new charter which would be Thailand's 20th since the military abolished an absolute monarchy in 1932, a junta-appointed Senate with seats reserved for military commanders would check the powers of elected lawmakers. 


The military took power in May 2014 with Prayut as premier after years of street protests and clashes between two rival factions identified by the colour of their shirts – red and yellow. 

The red shirts, mainly farmers and the rural poor in northern Thailand, backed former prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra who was ousted by a court order just before the coup in 2014, and her brother Thaksin whom the military had also ousted as prime minister in a 2006 coup. 


The military's strategy is to reduce the influence of Yingluck's party by increasing the power of other parties and the military. 

The constitution would also increase the number of seats in the 500-member lower house chosen by proportional representation, decrease the number chosen by district elections and limit the number of proportional seats that can be awarded to a single party.

src: http://www.business-standard.com/article/pti-stories/thailand-to-hold-election-in-2017-military-ruler-116080901098_1.html

PPP candidates all set to win LG elections unopposed, Pakistan People’s Party, Hyderabad , Mirpurkhas , Pakistan elections

PPP candidates all set to win LG elections unopposed, Pakistan People’s Party, Hyderabad , Mirpurkhas , Pakistan elections

The Pakistan Peoples Party’s (PPP) candidates for chairmen and vice-chairmen of district councils and municipal and town committees in many districts of Hyderabad and Mirpurkhas divisions are set to win unopposed as the PPP’s candidates were the only ones to submit their nomination papers on Saturday.


The party has bagged seats in the district councils in Hyderabad, Jamshoro, Mirpurkhas, Sujawal, Tando Muhammad Khan and Umerkot districts unopposed. In Mirpurkhas, however, the election is confronted with the possibility of a delay if the Pakistan Muslim League – Functional (PML-F) opts to challenge it in the court.

The PML-F’s candidates for chairman and vice-chairman for Mirpurkhas district council, Javed Junejo and Muhammad Baksh Mehar, blamed the returning officer of bias in favour of the PPP. While talking to the media, they alleged that their forms were not accepted even though they had reached the returning officer’s office in time on Saturday.

In Hyderabad, the PPP’s Badar Memon and Bilal Laghari will head the district council as chairman and vice-chairman. Kashif Shoro, local government minister Jam Khan Shoro’s brother, has also been elected as Qasimabad Municipal Committee chairman and Iqbal Soomro as its vice-chairman. The PPP also secured Husri Town Committee in Hyderabad without going for a vote.

However, in Hyderabad Municipal Corporation (HMC), which is the largest local government body in the district, the contestants from Muttahida Qaumi Movement and the PPP will face each other off. The former is destined to clinch a walkover on the PPP with its more than two-third majority in the HMC.

In Tharparkar, where the PPP has come uncontested on one municipal and four town committees, two town committees have also gone to the Arbab group of Pakistan Muslim League – Nawaz unopposed.

The PPP’s contestants also won unopposed 31 other municipal and town committees of

  1. Jamshoro
  2. Dadu
  3. Thatta
  4. Sujawal
  5. Tharparkar
  6. Mirpurkhas
  7. Umerkot
  8. Tando Muhammad Khan districts

Meanwhile, in Badin, where a group of independent candidates led by Zulfiqar Mirza defeated the PPP, the electoral battle will be fought in district council Badin, one municipal committee and seven town committees.

Live: Thailand Aug 7 constitutional referendum Schedule Dates Result, Thailand referendum , Thai Referendum latest updates,Thailand draft constitution

Live: Thailand Aug 7 constitutional referendum Schedule Dates Result, Thailand referendum , Thai Referendum latest updates,Thailand draft constitution

Voters in Thailand can be forgiven for having a sense of the familiar when they head to the polls on Aug. 7 for a referendum on a new constitution. They have been here before – a cycle that begins with elections, followed by accusations of corruption, political paralysis, military coups and then votes for a revised constitution.

Live Updates:

  1. Thailand has voted to accept a military-backed constitution, according to preliminary results
  2. With 94 percent of the vote counted on Sunday, results from the Election Commission showed 61.4 percent of the country had voted for the charter, while 37.9 percent rejected it
  3. Voter turnout was just over 50 percent. 
  4. The gap is wide enough not to change the result," Somchai Srisutthiyakorn, chairman of the commission, told reporters after 90 percent of the vote count had been completed.
  5. Full results are due on Wednesday.

The Aug. 7 vote will give Thais the opportunity to pass proposed changes to the constitution that ask for greater power to the military. The revised constitution allows the ruling council that is backed by the military to appoint all 250 seats in the Upper House of Parliament. Such a proposal would ensure a military say in running Thailand's affairs.

Such proposals have heightened anxieties in Thailand. The country's economy is modestly recovering from a downturn that in part has been created by the 2014 military coup. A ban on campaigning and dissenting voices against the proposed constitution has drawn concern from human rights observers.

ALSO READ: Phuket Opinion Poll on Thai work permit 

LIVE UPDATES THAILAND REFERENDUM AUGUST 7TH 2016

Here's all what you need to know:

THE QUESTIONS

Thai voters will answer two yes/no questions on the ballot.

The first is whether voters accept the draft constitution.

The second is whether they would approve a junta-appointed upper house Senate to join members of parliament's lower house in electing a prime minister during a five-year transitional period from military rule.

THE CONTROVERSY

The constitution would allow for an unelected prime minister in the event of political deadlock and a unelected senate appointed by the junta with seats reserved for military commanders to check the powers of elected lawmakers during the five-year transition period.

Provisions in the charter would legally oblige any future government to follow the military's 20-year national development plan and allows military allies to take legal action against any government which does not adhere to the plan.

Critics say the charter will give the military too much power over future elected governments and weaken their ability to govern. They say the constitution will do little to heal Thailand's bitter political divisions.

Experts say the referendum is also a vote on the legitimacy of military rule since a May 2014 coup.

BACKGROUND

For more than a decade, Thailand has been divided between rival camps, one is led by former populist premier Thaksin Shinawatra, who was toppled in a 2006 coup and later went into self-exile.

Ranged against his allies is the royalist and military establishment, which accuses Thaksin of poisoning politics with nepotism and corruption, charges he denies.

In May 2014, the democratically elected government of Yingluck Shinawatra, Thaksin's sister, was overthrown by the generals that formed the ruling junta, following months of street protests.

CAMPAIGNING

The government has been intent on preventing criticism of the draft charter, introducing a law that sets a 10-year jail term for campaigning ahead of the vote.

The junta itself, however, has used patriotic songs and television programmes to woo support.

MAJOR PLAYERS

Thailand's two biggest political parties have rejected the draft saying it is undemocratic.

Student activists, among the most vocal critics of the military government, have actively campaigned against the draft and more than a dozen have been detained.

The pro-Thaksin anti-government United Front For Democracy Against Dictatorship (UDD), known as the "red shirt" group, have attempted to set up election monitoring centres which they said were to prevent fraud. The authorities shut them down and charged members of the group with breaking a junta ban on political gatherings of more than five people.

LIKELY OUTCOME

Public opinion in the run-up to the referendum has been difficult to gauge because of the ban on campaigning.

A one-sided information campaign by the junta has left the majority of Thais undecided about how to vote and liable to make impulsive decisions, a leading pollster said last week.

WHAT NEXT?

If the constitution is approved, the junta has promised a general election in 2017.

There are no guidelines as to what would happen if the draft is rejected. The government has said it will meet on Aug. 9, two days after the referendum, to decide the next steps.

Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha has said regardless of the referendum outcome he would not resign and the general election will take place in 2017. (Compiled by Patpicha Tanakasempipat; Editing by Amy Sawitta Lefevre and Lincoln Feast)

 

Phuket Opinion Poll on Thai work permit , Thai Referendum, Thai work permit, Opinion Poll ,Thailand referendum

Phuket Opinion Poll on Thai work permit , Thai Referendum, Thai work permit, Opinion Poll ,Thailand referendum

The poll, which ran online for two weeks, asked: “Is the Thai work permit necessary?”

That question was prompted by the news last month that a work permit is not required in order to receive income from renting out a condo, an announcement that brought much relief to expat condo owners across the island.

Is the Thai work permit necessary?

Yes, the work permit is a valuable form of identification and should be upgraded to a photo ID card.

39%

Yes, the work permit is a valuable form of identification and should be kept in the booklet form as is.

5%

No, the work permit not necessary but there is no harm in keeping it.

6%

No, the work permit is pointless and should be discontinued immediately.

50%

6 aug

For decades the concept of whether or not money is received has been irrelevant as the definition of work in Thailand remains “engaging in work by exerting energy or using knowledge whether or not in consideration of wages or other benefits”

In defence of the work permit, 39 per cent of those who took part in the poll voted, “Yes, the work permit is a valuable form of identification and should be upgraded to a photo ID card.”

A further 5% of respondents voted, “Yes, the work permit is a valuable form of identification and should be kept in the booklet form as is.”

Interestingly, 6% of respondents in the poll supported the Thai work permit in its current format while noting that it performed no essential function on its own, voting, “No, the work permit not necessary but there is no harm in keeping it.”

To all this support, a neat 50% of all respondents in the poll voted, “No, the work permit is pointless and should be discontinued immediately.”

src: http://www.thephuketnews.com/phuket-poll-opinion-divided-on-thai-work-permit-58558.php

 

Prachanda all set to become Nepal PM, Pushpa Kamal Dahal ,Nepal Prime minister 2016 Election Live Coverage, Prachanda

Prachanda all set to become Nepal PM, Pushpa Kamal Dahal ,Nepal Prime minister 2016 Election Live Coverage, Prachanda 

The leader of Nepal's Maoist party, Pushpa Kamal Dahal, appeared certain to be the next prime minister after the deadline for nominations expired on Tuesday with only his name on the ballot.

Lawmakers in the Himalayan nation are due to elect a new prime minister on Wednesday after K.P. Sharma Oli resigned last week, minutes before facing a no-confidence motion in parliament.

"We have only received the nomination of Pushpa Kamal Dahal for the prime minister's post," deputy parliament spokesman Sudarshan Kuinkel told AFP, referring to the Maoist party leader.


The Maoist chief and former premier known for his anti-India stance is expected to become Nepal's 39th Prime Minister with the support of largest party Nepali Congress, the Madhesis and other fringe parties if there is no dramatic development.

Three Madhesi leaders – Upendra Yadav of Social Forum-Nepal, Sarvendra Nath Shukla of Tarai Madhesh Democratic Party and Laxman Lal Karna of Sadbhawana Party – have supported Prachanda's candidacy.

The Madhesi alliance decided to support Prachanda's candidacy after a 3-point agreement with the Nepali Congress (NC) and CPN (Maoist Centre) but will not join the government, Karna said.

With the support of the alliance, which has 39 lawmakers, Prachanda's election as the new prime minister has become almost certain.

Past Political Career

  1. He has served as prime minister once before, after the Maoists won elections in 2009, but only lasted nine months in office before resigning.
  2. The party lost ground in the last elections in 2013 and is now only the third-biggest force in parliament.

Nepal Prime Minister Election schedule candidate list opinion poll elections results 2016, CPN-UML, 2016 Nepal Prime Minister Election timetable

Nepal Prime Minister Election schedule candidate list opinion poll elections results 2016, CPN-UML, 2016 Nepal Prime Minister Election timetable

If all goes as planned, the Parliament Secretariat will conduct election for Prime Minister on August 3. The secretariat is making preparations for the same with the President-given deadline for the formation of a national unity government expiring (on Sunday), according to a source.

On Monday (August 1), a meeting of the Legislature-Parliament is taking place. The secretariat will make the election schedule public once it gets a letter from the Office of the President directing it to start the process for PM’s election. On August 2, according to the source, parties will nominate PM candidates/withdraw nominations.

August 3, as per the plan, will see election of Nepal’s new Prime Minister. Bharat Raj Gautam, spokesperson for the secretariat, said they will finalise the election timetable only after getting a letter from the President.

The alliance comprising the Nepali Conggress and the CPN-Maoist Centre has already decided to field Centre Chair Prachanda as PM candidate. The CPN-UML is yet to finalise its candidate for the post.

See more at: http://english.onlinekhabar.com/2016/07/31/382819

Will Thais accept the 2016 draft of the constitution? ,Thailand’s Political Referendum,August 7 refrendum, Prayuth Chan-ocha, draft constitution ,Thailand refrendum

Will Thais accept the 2016 draft of the constitution? ,Thailand’s Political Referendum,August 7 refrendum, Prayuth Chan-ocha, draft constitution ,Thailand refrendum constitution

Thais head to the polls next week to vote in a referendum designed to breathe life into what has become a stagnant democratic process. An affirmative vote on Aug. 7 will see Thailand adopt a new constitution — its twentieth since 1932.

Junta leader Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha, who seized power in 2014, has promised general elections next year — but not before a fresh constitution is adopted. But that next step is by no means a fait accompli for, once again, Thailand is polarized as many fear that Prayuth and his cadres are getting a little too comfortable in the government’s shoes.

While there are undoubtedly some who approve of the substance of the draft charter, which was painstakingly drawn up by a military-appointed committee, millions of disillusioned Thai citizens just want to see the wheels of democracy moving again.

Released publicly in March, the revised constitution has been touted as an edict to finally combat the endemic culture of corruption that pervades the country’s politics. The word “corruption” is mentioned no less than 46 times in the draft charter, with robust promises of organic laws and mechanisms “to rigorously prevent and eradicate corruption and misconduct,” as well as sweeping powers bestowed upon a nine-member National Counter Corruption Commission, which will be appointed by the King. The 94-page document also contains strong provisions on healthcare and education.

But critics say approval of the charter would entrench the junta’s grip on power, allowing it a large say in government even after it has left office. The new constitution would allow the military the opportunity to advocate its own candidate for prime minister, and permit it to step in and dissolve parliament at whim.

PUBLIC OPINION 

“I will vote ‘yes’,” says Nina, 48, a Bangkok businesswoman. “Because I believe it will solve the problem of government corruption.”

Father-of-two Komol, a furniture retailer in the southern city of Suratthani, says he will vote “yes” to the draft constitution because it includes 12 years of free public education for children.

In the northern city of Chiang Mai — a traditional stronghold of the opposition “Red Shirts” and their patriarch former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra (ousted in a 2006 military coup) and his sister Yingluck (ousted in the 2014 coup) — opinion is mostly unequivocal.

“I will definitely vote ‘no’,” says university lecturer Namwaan. “Yes is a vote for dictatorship. No is for democracy.”

SRC: http://time.com/4423508/thailand-referendum-constitution/

Japanese election Result:Shinzo Abe declares victory, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Japan’s upper house election, Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), Abenomics, Japan Election Result 2016

Japanese election Result:Shinzo Abe declares victory, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, Japan's upper house election, Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), Abenomics, Japan Election Result 2016

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has declared victory in Sunday's election, with his ruling coalition winning a majority of seats in Japan's upper house.

Abe said Monday he would use his victory to push forward with his economic reform program — also known as Abenomics — along with further changes to his diplomatic policies.

Together with the pro-constitutional revisionists, his coalition has gained a two-thirds majority of the 121-seat upper house.

Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) fell short of winning a simple majority, which would have increased its clout within the coalition. Earlier projections had shown it was within their grasp for the first time since 1989.

Nevertheless, the overall victory will still bolster Abe’s grip over the conservative party that he led back to power in 2012 promising to reboot the economy with hyper-easy monetary policy, fiscal spending and reforms.

Any attempt to revise the constitution will still be politically fraught and LDP heavyweights have suggested that amending the pacifist Article 9 would not be the first priority.

Abe told a TV broadcaster it was too early to talk about specific revisions to the constitution and his No.2 in the party said separately that talks with the opposition were needed.

“I have two more years to my term (as LDP president) and this is a goal of the LDP, so I want to address it calmly,” Abe said.

Controversial issue

The result will also allow Abe to take a step forward toward constitutional amendments, a controversial issue that has divided the nation.

In Japan, war is banned. Since the end of World War II, Japan's constitution has renounced the threat or use of force. War as a means to settle international disputes is outlawed, according to Article 9 of the constitution.

The military can only be used for defensive purposes.

The rise of China's military and its expansionism in the South and East China Seas, together with North Korea's increasing belligerence, is helping Abe's push.

It's still a very sensitive subject in Japan, but attitudes could be changing. Exit polls on Sunday showed 49% of voters supported revising the constitution. Forty-four percent were against it.

The vote came just days before the United Nations rules on China's highly controversial territorial claims in the South China Sea.

Japanese House of Councillors election 2016, House of Councillors election 2016, Japanese elections opinion poll survey, Result Live voting,Japan Elections 2016

Japanese House of Councillors election 2016, House of Councillors election 2016, Japanese elections opinion poll survey, Result Live voting,Japan Elections 2016

The 24th regular election of members of the House of Councillors will be held on Sunday 10 July 2016 to elect 121 of the 242 members of the House of Councillors

According to surveys Abe’s Coalition Is Expected to Gain Seats in Japan Polls

 The Yomiuri Shimbun survey

  1. The Liberal Democratic Party and Komeito continue to perform well in the House of Councillors campaign, according to a public opinion poll conducted by The Yomiuri Shimbun in the final stages of the race.
  2. The poll results, which are largely consistent with an early stage survey, show close contests between the ruling and opposition parties in 12 of the 32 constituencies where one seat is up for grabs. Contests for several constituencies with multiple seats at stake are also close. How the 30 percent of respondents who did not state a preference for candidates in constituency-based races will vote is now the focus of attention.
  3. The latest poll shows LDP candidates leading unified opposition party candidates in 17 constituencies, including Tochigi, Toyama and Wakayama. The LDP is seen as leading in the Gifu and Okayama constituencies, which were close in the earlier poll. The party appears to be faring well in the Chugoku region, the Kyushu region and other areas of western Japan, where it has a large conservative base.

 Kyodo News survey 

  1. The survey showed Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s Liberal Democratic Party and coalition partner Komeito are likely to win at least 74 of the 121 seats up for grabs in the election, surpassing Abe’s stated target of 61, a majority of the contested seats.
  2. On its own, the LDP could win at least 60 seats. By combining at least 57 of the contested seats with the noncontested seats it already holds, the LDP is gearing up to achieve a simple majority in the Upper House for the first time in 27 years, according to the survey.
  3. The survey found Komeito is likely to gain ground with 14 seats, while Osaka Ishin no Kai is likely to win six seats.
  4. The four pro-constitutional change parties — the LDP, Komeito, Osaka Ishin no Kai and the Nihon no Kokoro o Taisetsu ni suru To (Party for Japanese Kokoro) — together hold 84 noncontested seats. If the four parties win 78 of the contested seats, they will reach the two-thirds majority.
  5. About 43,000 eligible voters responded in the three-day telephone survey.
  6. Two ballots will be cast each for constituencies that will account for 73 of the 121 contested seats, and for 48 seats through the proportional representation system.
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