UK opposition Labour lawmakers pass motion of no confidence in leader Jeremy Corbyn, Jeremy Corbyn, Labour Party , Britain, Members of Parliament, motion of no confidence

UK opposition Labour lawmakers pass motion of no confidence in leader Jeremy Corbyn, Jeremy Corbyn,  Labour Party , Britain, Members of Parliament, motion of no confidence 

Lawmakers from Britain’s opposition Labour Party have backed a motion of no confidence in their leader Jeremy Corbyn, the party said on Tuesday. The motion was tabled in the wake of Britain’s vote to leave the European Union and backed by many who felt he had not campaigned hard enough to keep the country inside the EU, and would not be able to win a future election.

The result, which was expected after days of heavy criticism from within his party, has no formal consequence and does not automatically trigger a leadership election. Corbyn has previously said he will not resign and would stand again if the party did call a leadership contest.

Corbyn subsequently said he would not resign, in a statement issued shortly after the vote-– I was democratically elected leader of our party for a new kind of politics by 60 percent of Labour members and supporters, and I will not betray them by resigning"Today's vote by MPs (Members of Parliament) has no constitutional legitimacy."

Britain’s opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn vowed to fight to retain control of his Labour party on Monday after almost all his policy team withdrew their support for him in protest after Britons voted to leave the European Union.

Corbyn is resisting pressure to quit over what critics say was his lacklustre effort to keep Britain inside the European Union.

The new shadow cabinet line-up includes:

  • Shadow foreign secretary – Emily Thornberry
  • Shadow health secretary – Diane Abbott
  • Shadow education secretary – Pat Glass
  • Shadow transport secretary – Andy McDonald
  • Shadow defence secretary – Clive Lewis
  • Shadow chief secretary to the Treasury – Rebecca Long-Bailey
  • Shadow international development secretary – Kate Osamor
  • Shadow environment food and rural affairs secretary – Rachel Maskell
  • Shadow voter engagement and youth affairs – Cat Smith
  • Shadow Northern Ireland secretary – Dave Anderson

SRC:financialexpress&bbc.com

Frexit, Nexit or Oexit? Who will be next to leave the European Union, Netherlands, France, Austria, Sweden, Germany

Frexit, Nexit or Oexit? Who will be next to leave the European Union, Netherlands, France, Austria, Sweden, Germany

Netherlands

On Brexit morning, Nigel Farage suggested that the Netherlands might be the next country to quit the “dying” EU. “We may well be close, perhaps, to a Nexit,” he said.

A poll published on Sunday by peil.nl found a slim majority in favour of holding a referendum (50% to 47%) but also, to Farage’s likely chagrin, a majority for staying in the EU (46% to 43%).

Among voters with the lowest educational profile the appetite for Nexit was much stronger – 69% favour holding a referendum and 64% would vote leave. 
France

Marine Le Pen, leader of the Front National, has suggested that France could follow Britain in leaving the EU, hailing the Brexit vote as the beginning of “a movement that can’t be stopped”.

Le Pen has said that if she wins the French presidential election next April, she will hold an in-out referendum on the country’s membership of the EU within six months. That, though, remains a big “if” – even though she is expected to comfortably reach the final round of the presidential run-off.
Italy

For Brussels, the biggest threat from Italy comes from the anti-establishment Five Star Movement, which recently had candidates elected as mayors of Rome and Turin and wants a referendum on leaving the eurozone.

Trouble is, no matter how much Beppe Grillo, the comedian who founded the M5S, might push the plebiscite, most Italians – 61% according to a poll in March – support remaining in the single currency.
Austria

Norbert Hofer, the far-right candidate who narrowly missed out on winning the Austrian presidential election last month, has said that his country should have a referendum on EU membership if, within a year, Brussels makes any moves towards political “centralisation” and fails to refocus on its original role as an economic and trade alliance.

The Austrian media have dubbed the potential vote “Auxit” or “Oexit” – a reference to Österreich, which means Austria in German. But the Austrian chancellor, Christian Kern, has said there will be no referendum.
Hofer is challenging the result of the presidential election that he narrowly lost, alleging there were irregularities in the counting of postal ballots. However, even if the FPO’s challenge is successful, the president alone does not have the power to order a referendum.

Sweden

The leader of the anti-immigration Sweden Democrats, Jimmie Åkesson, has said he hopes that Sweden might be able to renegotiate its relationship with the EU and then hold a referendum on membership.

“I see nothing negative about leaving this supranational European Union,” said Åkesson, who has repeatedly called for Sweden to “become a sovereign state again”.

The Sweden Democrats hold the balance of power in Stockholm. The party attracted 12.9% of the vote in the 2014 election, but saw their support rise to about 20% last year as Sweden took in a record number of asylum seekers and tensions around immigration flared.
Germany

Beatrix von Storch, an MEP for the rightwing populist party Alternative für Deutschland (AfD), celebrated Brexit as “Great Britain’s independence day” and has previously called for a similar referendum to be held in Germany, saying the German people “should be given a voice”.

After the referendum result was announced on Friday, she also called for Martin Schulz, the president of the European parliament, and Jean-Claude Juncker, the head of the European commission, to resign.

However, despite a recent growith in support for the AfD, the German people remain broadly in favour of remaining in the union, with about 40% believing a referendum on the subject should be held and less than 35% saying they would vote to leave.
src:hitc.com

Scottexit Opinion Poll results 2016, Scottish referendum, Scottish independence ,Scotland latest poll , Scotland latest survey

Scottexit Opinion Poll results 2016, Scottish referendum, Scottish independence ,Scotland latest poll , Scotland latest survey

The Survation poll for the Daily Record points to a shift in public opinion after the UK's decision to leave the European Union.

Of 1002 people surveyed over the weekend, 53.7% said they would vote for independence, against 46.3% in favour of staying in the UK.

ALSO READ:

30 JULY:  Latest Scotexit YouGov survey

Including "don't knows", the figures show 47.8% backing for Yes and 41.3% supporting No.

Survation poll

Leave

53.70%

Remain

46.30%

Scottish voters rejected independence by 55% to 45% in the September 2014 referendum.

But the latest poll was carried out after the UK voted on Thursday to leave the European Union by a margin of 52% to 48%. In contrast, Scotland opted to be part of the EU, by 62% to 38%.

 Recent polls suggest that the public mood in Scotland is already swinging in favour of leaving the U.K. If 55 per cent of Scots voted for their country continuing in the U.K. in the 2014 referendum, an opinion poll shows that 52 per cent now support Scottexit. Ms. Sturgeon has already said that another independence referendum is “highly likely”. The question is whether the U.K. leadership will allow that to happen.

It would certainly be a risky move. If Scotland gets another independence vote, calls for Northern Ireland to be merged with the Republic of Ireland, an EU member, could gain momentum. In Northern Ireland, 56 per cent had supported Remain.

Iceland Presidential Election Results 2016 Voting Live Opinion Poll Schedule Candidates, Gudni Johannesson Swearing in 1 August, Vote Margin Winner Runner Up candidate

Gudni Johannesson wins Iceland’s presidential election, Iceland presidential election result, Political newcomer and history professor Gudni Johannesson, Iceland presidential election result vote margin winner runner up candidate party

Guðni won the election with 39.1% of the votes. Halla received 27.9%, Andri Snær 14.3%, Davíð 13.7% and Sturla 3.5%.The turnout was 75.7%. 

Summary of the 25 June 2016 Icelandic presidentialelection results

Candidate

Party

Votes

%

Guðni Th. Jóhannesson

independent

71,356

38.49

Halla Tómasdóttir

independent

50,995

27.51

Andri Snær Magnason

independent

26,037

14.04

Davíð Oddsson

Independence Party

25,108

13.54

Sturla Jónsson

Sturla Jónsson

6,446

3.48

Elísabet Jökulsdóttir

independent

1,280

0.69

Ástþór Magnússon

independent

615

0.33

Guðrún Margrét Pálsdóttir

independent

477

0.26

Hildur Þórðardóttir

independent

294

0.16

Valid votes

1,82,608

98.5

Invalid/Blank votes

2,782

1.5

Total

1,85,390

100

Electorate/Turnout

2,45,004

75.70%

Iceland Election Results 2016 Highlights 

  1. Iceland elects Gudni Johannesson as President, a Political New Comer, he is first New candidate in 20 years.
  2. He won 39.1% votes in the Country.
  3. Turnout in the election was also higher than in the last vote four years ago, at nearly 76 %.
  4. Johannesson officially takes over the post on August 1.
  5. Gudni Johannesson got 39.1 percent of votes, Second was businesswoman Halla Tomasdottir, with 29.4 %, according to results announced on public television channel RUV.
  6. Jóhannesson will replace President Ólafur Ragnar Grímsson, 73, who has served as Iceland's head of state since 1996.
  7. Panama Papers scandal Called for the resignation of Iceland Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson after it revealed personal financial arrangements.
  8. He Published these lines on his official website after winning elections. "The last few weeks have been unforgettable. Life changing, and in the best possible way. I am, and always will be, forever grateful to all – for the time you have shared to listen to my vision, and for the boundless support and encouragement you have given me.you," 

Austrian far-right figure warns of ‘Auxit’ vote within a year, Auxit, Frexit, Brexit , Austria referendum, Norbert Hofer, Freedom Party, Heinz-Christian Strache

Austrian far-right figure warns of 'Auxit' vote within a year, Auxit, Frexit, Brexit , Austria referendum, Norbert Hofer,  Freedom Party, Heinz-Christian Strache

The European Union should avoid any moves towards political "centralisation" or else Austria could hold a referendum on membership of the bloc within a year, a far-right candidate who almost won the country's presidential election said.

Norbert Hofer of the anti-immigration Freedom Party narrowly failed to become the European Union's first far-right head of state in Austria's presidential run-off last month. His party has, however, challenged that result and a ruling is pending.

Britain's Brexit vote last week to leave the European Union has emboldened populist, anti-EU parties across the continent, including the Freedom Party (FPO) and France's National Front, which called on Friday for a "Frexit" referendum.

FPO leader Heinz-Christian Strache has taken a more cautious view, saying only that an Austrian referendum on the issue might become a party objective in the future. But Hofer went further in an interview published on Sunday.

"If a course is set within a year further towards centralisation instead of taking (the EU's) core values into account, then we must ask Austrians whether they want to be members," he told the tabloid newspaper Oesterreich.

Hofer and his allies believe the bloc should be based on economic rather than political union.

Austrian Chancellor Christian Kern has said Austria will not hold a referendum on EU membership, which the country's media have dubbed an "Auxit" or "Oexit" vote, a reference to Oesterreich, which means Austria in German.

But the two parties in his often-divided centrist coalition government must find a way to work together until 2018 and win over voters or face a snap parliamentary election that polls suggest the FPO would win.

src:reuters

Scottish Referendum soon, Scotland gains support for EU exit, Scottish independence Referendum, United Kingdom

Scottish Referendum soon, Scotland gains support for EU exit, Scottish independence Referendum, United Kingdom

Nearly 60 percent of Scots now support Scottish independence after Britain voted to leave the European Union this week, according to a new opinion poll.

The Sunday Post said 59 per cent of respondents in the poll backed independence from the United Kingdom. That was sharply higher than the 45 per cent of votes cast in favour of independence at a referendum in 2014 which resulted in the country staying in the UK.

Scots voted for remain  

62-38%

British voted to leave

52-48%

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said earlier on Saturday that a fresh independence referendum was possible. 

Many Scots voted in favour of remaining in the UK in 2014 because of concerns that breaking away might leave them outside the bloc.

Scots voted by 62-38 percent to remain in the EU in Thursday's EU membership referendum but British voters as a whole voted by 52-48 percent to leave.

The Sunday Post reported the poll finding on its front page. The newspaper declined to provide further details of the poll.

A second poll released on Saturday night also showed more Scots now favour independence.

A Panelbase survey for the Sunday Times found 52 percent of respondents wanted to break with the rest of Britain, with 48 percent opposed. That survey interviewed 620 adults on Friday and Saturday.

src:telegraph.co.uk

Spain Exit Polls, Spanish General Election 2016 Exit polls, Spain repeat election exit polls, Popular Party, Podemos,PSOE

Spain Exit Polls, Spanish General Election 2016 Exit polls, Spain repeat election exit polls, Popular Party, Podemos,PSOE

The outgoing conservative Popular Party (PP) had based much of its campaign on trying to counter the rise of the upstart, emphasising the need for "stability" in the face of "populism" — and it reinforced this message Friday after Brexit. 

But according to a wide-ranging exit poll for public television TVE, it may only have won up to 121 parliamentary seats, far below the 176 needed for an absolute majority and even lower than the 123 it won in December.

ALSO READ:

Spain Election News

Spain Opinion Polls

Spain General Election Live Results

Unidos Podemos, meanwhile, looked poised to secure 91 to 95 seats, and the Socialists 81 to 85, according to the poll. 

TVE Exit Polls

Popular Party

117-121 seats

Unidos Podemos

91 – 95 seats

Socialists 

81 – 85

Ciudadanos

25-30 seats

But this also resulted in a 350-seat parliament so splintered that parties failed to agree on a coalition, prompting today's repeat vote. The general election in December had seen Podemos and centre-right upstart Ciudadanos uproot the country's two-party dominance in an unprecedented result. 

All eyes will now be on subsequent coalition negotiations, with political leaders under more pressure this time to form some sort of government and avoid a third round of elections. 

Throughout the campaign — and again on Friday after the Brexit vote — the PP had hammered away at the need for stability in reference to the rise of Unidos Podemos, which like Greece's ruling Syriza party rejects EU-backed austerity and pledges to fight for the least well-off.

Spain General 3rd Election Live Results Schedule Date 2016, 26th December Spanish Election Result 2016 Latest News Update, Spain Election Results 2016, Spain Election Result Day, Spain

Spain General Election Live Results Voter Turnout, 26th december Spanish Election Result 2016 Latest News Update, Spain Election Results 2016, Spain Election Result Day, Spain Spain Election News

The four main parties — the conservative PP, the socialist PSOE, the liberal Ciudadanos and the radical-left Podemos — failed to come together to form a government, even though some of them (mainly PSOE and Ciudadanos) certainly tried. Since the parties weren’t able to form a coalition government, Spain will hold a new election.

The December election gave the Mariano Rajoy's ruling center-right Popular Party 123 seats in the 350-member Congress, while PSOE got 90, followed by two new parties in the national scene, Podemos with 69 seats, and Ciudadanos with 40.

Third election tentative date – 26th December 2016
Mariano Rajoy was proposed as candidate by King Felipe VI on 28 July, with Rajoy's investiture session starting on 30 August and a first round of voting scheduled for the next day. As a result, the date for a possible new election would tentatively be set for Christmas Day, 25 December 2016, in the event no candidate is able to obtain the confidence of the Congress of Deputies before 31 October

Official results give the PP 137 seats in the 350-seat parliament and the PSOE 85 – confounding an earlier exit poll suggesting the Socialists would slip into third place.Unidos Podemos have won 71 and Ciudadanos 32. Both parties are relative newcomers to the Spanish political scene.

 

Party Seats Vote%
PP 137 33%
PSOE  85 23%
Unidos Podemos 71 21%
Ciudadanos  32 13%
Others 25 10%

 Read More: Rajoy's Effort to form Government, Get support from Ciudadanos/Other parties

Spain 2015 general election result
PP 122 seats 28.72%
Socialists 90 seats 22.01%
Podemos 69 seats 20.66%
Ciudadanos 40 setas 13.93%
others 29 seats 14.68%

25 juneeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

 

 

Spain General Election Live Voting %, 26th June Spanish Election Result 2016 Latest News Update, Spain Election Results 2016, Spain Election Day, Spain Election Voting % Live, Spain Election Latest News

Spain General Election Results Live Voting %, 26th June Spanish Election Opinion Polls 2016 Latest News Update, Spain Election Results 2016, Spain Election Day, Spain Election Voting % Live, Spain Election Latest News

The PP has won Spain’s repeat election, doing even better than it did at the original vote on December 20. Total Turnout was 70 percent, three points lower than in December. 

Read More: Latest on Rajoy's PP Efforts to form Government in Spain. Is Spain headed towards 3rd elections in an year.

Live Voting % Highlights

 
  1. PP has won Spain’s repeat election, winning more seats than in December 2015
  2. 2016 election results PP 33%; PSOE 23%; UNIDOS PODEMOS 21%; Ciudadanos 13%
  3. Acting Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy is still short of a majority
  4. PSOE leader Pedro Sanchez says his party is the "foremost political power on the left"
  5. Unidos Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias failed to beat the Socialists to second place
  6. Pablo Iglesias: "We are not at all satisfied with these results"
  7. Polls open at 07:00 GMT and close at 18:00 GMT
  8. People across Spain are casting their ballots for the second time in six months Last one was in december 2015. Since then Spain has no governement only an acting government by PP led by acting PM Rajoy.
  9. Sunday's repeat vote comes after the four main political parties failed to form any kind of coalition.
  10. Latest Opinion polls still suggest, political deadlock and no Single Party will be able to get absolute Majority.
  11. The polls suggest that the conservative Popular Party (PP) will again majority but not good enough to form government alone. 

Some Highlights ahead of Polls : Spain General Election Results Live Voting %

  1. The ruling conservative Popular Party (PP) led by acting Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy is expected to take the largest share of the vote.
  2. A leftist coalition, Unidos Podemos, would come second, followed by the Socialists and Ciudadanos.But no party is seen as coming close to an overall majority of seats.
  3. Spanish newcomers Podemos and Ciudadanos winning over voters ahead of federal election Spain Election results Live Voting
  4. The December election gave the Mariano Rajoy's ruling center-right Popular Party 123 seats in the 350-member Congress, while PSOE got 90, followed by two new parties in the national scene, Podemos with 69 seats, and Ciudadanos with 40.
  5. The Brexit twist? If U.K. voters surprise the markets with an EU exit, that could alter the outcome of the Spanish election.

Spain Election Schedule/Date/TimeLine: 

  1. Election to be held on June 26th, 2016
  2. Campaigning starts officially from June 10th, 2016

Spain Opinion Polls

All the Opinion Polls Show PP(Popular Party) at first position,Unidos Podemos at second and then PSOE, Ciudadanos. See summary of other Opinion Polls for Spain here

  1. Surveys published in El Pais, El Mundo and El Espanol show PM Mariano Rajoy's conservative

     

     

     

     

     

     

    1. Popular Party(PP) at 1st 27.7-31 percent,
    2. 2nd is Podemos lead Coaliation made of Podemos and Izquierda Unida with 23.7-25.6% and
    3. at 3rd is Socialists at 20.2-21.6%

 

Spain Election Opinion polls, Summary of all opinion poll of Spain repeat election, Opinion polling for the Spanish general election 2016, Spain Election opinion poll 2016, Spanish Elections, June 26 Spain Election

Spain Election Opinion polls, Summary of all opinion poll of Spain repeat election, Opinion polling for the Spanish general election 2016, Spain Election opinion poll 2016, Spanish Elections, June 26 Spain Election

Here is a Summary of all Opinion Polls released till now. The Final Spain Repeat Election voting is on 26th June 2016.

In the run up to the 2016 Spanish general election, various organisations carry out opinion polling to gauge voting intention in Spain. Results of such polls are displayed below.The highest percentage figure in each polling survey is displayed in bold.Spain Election News

Summary of Opinion poll for the Spanish general election 2016
Polling firm Last date of polling People's Party (Partido Popular
)
PSOE (Partido Socialista Obrero Español) Unidos Podemos Citizens Margin
of error
Sample
size
GESOP June 23, 2016 28 21.8 24 15.2 ±3.3 pp 900
GESOP June 22, 2016 28.2 21.7 23.6 15.2 ±3.3 pp 900
GESOP June 21, 2016 28.5 21.5 23.7 15.2 ±3.3 pp 900
GESOP June 20, 2016 29 21.5 23.7 14.9 ±3.3 pp 900
GAD3 June 20, 2016 30.7 21.2 24.9 14.1 ±2.2 pp 1,900
GIPEyOP June 20, 2016 29.5 22 24.5 14.5 ±1.0 pp 10,244
Redondo & Asociados June 19, 2016 29.4 21.5 24.9 15.1 ±3.1 pp 1,000
Invymark June 19, 2016 30.1 19.9 26.1 13.8 ±2.8 pp 1,200

src:wikipedia

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