Online voting registration In United States,vote online ,register to vote online US,online voting result ,voter registration ,online voter registration ,voter registration card , US voter registration form ,US voter registration deadline ,official voter registration website ,electoral voter registration , US voter registration campaign

Online voting registration In United States,vote online ,register to vote online US,online voting result ,voter registration ,online voter registration ,voter registration card , US voter registration form ,US voter registration deadline ,official voter registration website ,electoral voter registration , US voter registration campaign 

Voting Rules in the U.S. Are Different in Every State

Register to Vote

If you need to register to vote, visit Vote.USA.gov. Depending on your state’s voter registration rules, the site can help you

Start Your Voter Registration

First Time Voters

First time voters who didn’t register in person and haven’t previously provided proof of ID are required by federal law to show some form of identification.

States With Online Voter Registration

State

Year Enacted

Bill Number

Year Implemented

Website

Alabama n/a No legislation required 2016 Alabama Votes
Alaska n/a No legislation required 2015 Alaska Online Voter Registration

Arizona

n/a

No legislation required

2002

EZ Voter Registration

California

2011

SB 397

2012

California Online Voter Registration

Colorado

2009

HB 1160

2010

Go Vote Colorado

Connecticut

2012

HB 5024

2014

Connecticut Online Voter Registration

Delaware

n/a

No legislation required

2014

I Vote Delaware

District of Columbia

2014

B20-0264

2015

District of Columbia Online Voter Registration

Florida

2015

SB 228

n/a

Not implemented yet

Georgia

2012

SB 92

2014

Georgia Online Voter Registration

Hawaii

2012

HB 1755

2015

Hawaii Online Voter Registration 

Idaho 2016 SB 1297 n/a Not implemented yet

Illinois

2013

HB 2418

2014

Illinois Online Voter Registration

Indiana

2009

HB 1346

2010

Indiana Online Voter Registration

Iowa n/a No legislation required 2016 Iowa Online Voter Registration

Kansas

n/a

No legislation required

2009

Kansas Online Voter Registration

Kentucky n/a No legislation required 2016 Kentucky Online Voter Registration

Louisiana

2009

HB 520

2010

Geaux Vote

Maryland

2011

HB 740

2012

Maryland Online Voter Registration

Massachusetts

2014

HB 3788

2015

Massachusetts Online Voter Registration

Minnesota (a)

2014

HF 2096

2013

MN Votes

Missouri (b)

n/a

No legislation required

2014

Vote Missouri

Nebraska

2014

LB 661

2015

Nebraska Online Voter Registration

Nevada

2011

AB 82

2012

Nevada Online Voter Registration

New Mexico

2015

SB 643

2016

New Mexico Online Voter Registration

New York (c)

n/a

No legislation required

2011

New York Electronic Voter Registration 

Ohio 2016 SB 63 n/a Not implemented yet

Oklahoma

2015

SB 313

n/a

Not implemented yet

Oregon

2009

HB 2386

2010

OreStar

Pennsylvania

n/a

No legislation required

2015

PA Online Voter Registration

Rhode Island 2016 SB 2513 n/a Not implemented yet

South Carolina

2012

HB 4945

2012

S.C. Online Voter Registration

Tennessee 2016 SB1626/HB1472 n/a Not implemented yet

Utah

2009

SB 25

2010

Utah Online Voter Registration

Vermont n/a No legislation required 2015 Vermont Online Voter Registration

Virginia

2013

HB 2341

2013

Virginia Voter Registration

Washington

2007

HB 1528

2008

MyVote

West Virginia

2013

SB 477

2015

West Virginia Online Voter Registration

Wisconsin 2016 SB 295 n/a Not implemented yet

Voter Registration Age Requirements by State

-1

State Earliest Age
Alabama 18 on or before next election
Alaska Be at least 18 years old or within 90 days of your 18th birthday
Arizona 18 on or before next General Election
Arkansas 18 on before before next election
California 18 on or before next election
Colorado 18 before next election
Connecticut Be at least 17 and turning 18 before Election Day
Delaware 18 before next election
District of Columbia Be at least 17 years old, and turn 18 years old on or before the date of the next general election
Florida You can pre-register at 16, but you have to be 18 to vote
Georgia At least 17 1/2 years of age to register and 18 to vote.
Hawaii You can pre-register at 16, but you have to be 18 by election day to vote
Idaho 18 on or before next election
Illinois (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) Must be at least 18 years of age by Election Day; 17 years of age to vote in a General Primary if individual will be 18 as of the following General Election.
Indiana Be at least 18 years of age on or before the next General or Municipal Election.
Iowa 6 months before 18th birthday
Kansas (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) Reached the age of 18 before the next election.
Kentucky (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) 18 on or before next election
Louisiana Must be 17 years old (16 years old if registering in person at the registrar of voters office or at the Louisiana Office of Motor Vehicles), but must be 18 years old to vote.
Maine 18 by next General Election (note: you can vote at age 17 in a primary, if you'll be 18 by the next General Election)
Maryland You may register to vote if you are at least 16 years old but cannot vote unless you will be at least 18 years old by the next general election.
Massachusetts Be at least 18 years of age on or before the next election.
Michigan At least 18 years old by Election Day
Minnesota 18 on or before next election
Mississippi (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) 18 on or before next election
Missouri 17 ½ years of age to register, 18 years of age to vote
Montana 18 on or before next election
Nebraska (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) 18 years of age on or before the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November of the current calendar year.
Nevada 18 on or before next election
New Hampshire 18 on or before next election
New Jersey 17 years of age to register, 18 years of age to vote
New Mexico 17 years of age to pre-register, 18 years of age to vote
New York 18 by end of calendar year that you register (note: you must be 18 years old by the date of the general, primary or other election in which you want to vote).
North Carolina (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) 18 on or before next election
North Dakota No registration required. Must be at least 18 years old on the day of the election to vote.
Ohio Be at least 18 years old on or before the day of the general election.
Oklahoma 18 on or before next election
Oregon If you are 17 years of age, you will not receive a ballot until an election occurs on or after your 18th birthday.
Pennsylvania 18 on or before next election.
Rhode Island You can pre-register at 16, but you have to be 18 to vote
South Carolina 18 on or before next election
South Dakota 18 on or before next election
Tennessee 18 on or before next election
Texas Be at least 18 years old on election day.
Utah (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) You can preregister to vote if you are 16 or 17 years of age. Must be at least 18 years old on or before the next election to vote.
Vermont Must be 18 years old before election.
Virginia Be 18 years old (any person who is 17 years old and will be 18 years of age at the next general election shall be permitted to register in advance and also vote in any intervening primary or special election).
Washington 18 before next election.
West Virginia Must be 17 years old and 18 before the next general election. 17 year olds may register and vote in primary elections if they turn 18 before the next general election.
Wisconsin (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) Be at least 18 years of age on the day of the election to be eligible to vote. Persons who are otherwise eligible to vote may register to vote at 17 years of age if they will be 18 by the next election.
Wyoming 18 on or before next election.

Voter Registration Deadlines for the General Election by State

-1

Find your state's voter registration deadlines for the Federal General Election—to be held on November 8, 2016—below. This page provides information taken from state election office websites as of October 14, 2016. This information can change due to holidays, natural disasters or other extensions applied in a state by state basis. We recommend contacting your local state election office to confirm. Or you can select your state name below to be taken directly to its election office website.

State Registration Deadline Election Day Registration
Alabama (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Oct 24
  • Mail-Oct 24
  • In Person- Oct 24
Not available. 
Alaska
  • Online- Oct 9
  • Mail- Oct 9
  • In Person- Oct 9
In a Presidential Election year, for November General Election only, you can register to vote on Election day.
Arizona (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Oct 10
  • Mail- Oct 8
  • In Person- Oct 10
 Not available. 
Arkansas (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online-  NA
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available. 
California
  • Online- Oct 24
  • Mail- Oct 24
  • In Person- Oct  24
 Not available.
Colorado (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Oct 31
  • Mail- Oct 31
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may also register in person on Election Day.
Connecticut (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Nov 1
  • Mail- Nov 1
  • In Person- Nov 1
You may also register in person on Election Day, but only at designated locations.
Delaware
  • Online- Oct 15
  • Mail- Oct 15
  • In Person- Oct 15
Not available. 
District of Columbia (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online – Oct 11
  • Mail – Oct 11
  • In Person – Nov 8
You may also register in person on Election Day as long as you can provide proof of residency.
Florida
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 18
  • In Person- Oct 18
Not available.
Georgia
  • Online- Oct 11
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available.
Hawaii
  • Online – Oct 10
  • Mail- Oct 10
  • In Person – Oct 10
Late registration available in person from Oct 25 – Nov 5. 
Idaho
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 14
  • In Person- Nov 14
You may also register in person on Election Day as long as you can provide proof of residency.
Illinois (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Oct 23
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may also register in person at designated locations on Election Day as long as you can provide proof of residency.
Indiana
  • Online- Oct 11
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 1
Not available. 
Iowa (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Oct 29
  • Mail- Oct 24
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may also register in person on Election Day as long as you can provide proof of residency and identification.
Kansas
  • Online- Oct 18
  • Mail- Oct 18
  • In Person- Oct 18
Not available. 
Kentucky
  • Online- Oct 11
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available. 
Louisiana
  • Online- Oct 11
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available. 
Maine
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 18
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may also register in person on or before Election Day.
Maryland
  • Online- Oct 18
  • Mail – Oct 18
  • In Person- Oct 18
*Same day registration is available during early voting period. 
Massachusetts
  • Online- Oct 19
  • Mail- Oct 19
  • In Person- Oct 19
Not available. 
Michigan (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- October 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available. 
Minnesota
  • Online- Oct 18
  • Mail- Oct 18
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may also register in person on Election Day as long as you can provide proof of residency.
Mississippi (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 8
  • In Person- Oct 8
Not available. 
Missouri
  • Online- Oct 12
  • Mail- Oct 12
  • In Person- Oct 12
Not available.
Montana
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may register in person at the county election office on Election Day.
Nebraska (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Oct 21
  • Mail- Oct 21
  • In Person- Oct 28
Not available. 
Nevada
  • Online- Oct 18
  • Mail- Oct 8
  • In Person- Oct 18
Not available. 
New Hampshire
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 29
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may register to vote on Election Day as long as the polls are open. 
New Jersey
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 18
  • In Person- Oct 18
Not available. 
New Mexico
  • Online- Oct 11
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available. 
New York
  • Online- Oct 14
  • Mail- Oct 14
  • In Person- Oct 14
Not available. 
North Carolina
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 14
  • In Person- Oct 14
Not available. 
North Dakota (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
Only state without voter registration. Learn about voting requirements in North Dakota. 
North Dakota is the only state without voter registration.
Ohio (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
*You can register and vote the same day during the early voting period. 
Oklahoma
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 14
  • In Person- Oct 14
Not available. 
Oregon
  • Online- Oct 18
  • Mail- Oct 18
  • In Person- Oct 18

Not available. 
Pennsylvania
  • Online- Oct 11
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available. 
Rhode Island
  • Online- Oct 9
  • Mail- Oct 9
  • In Person- Oct 9
You may register and vote for President/Vice-President only at your local Board of Canvassers on Election Day.
South Carolina
  • Online- Oct 9
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 8
Not available. 
South Dakota
  • Online – Not available
  • Mail- Oct 24
  • In Person-Oct 24
Not available. 
Tennessee
  • Online – Not available
  • Mail – Oct 11
  • In Person – Oct 11
Not available.
Texas
  • Online – Not available
  • Mail – Oct 11
  • In Person – Oct 11
Not available. 
Utah
  • Online – Nov 1
  • Mail – Oct 9
  • In Person – Nov 1
Not available.
Vermont
  • Online – Nov 2
  • Mail – Nov 2
  • In Person – Nov 2
Not available. 
Virginia
  • Online – Oct 17
  • Mail – Oct 17
  • In Person – Oct 17
Not available. 
Washington
  • Online – Oct 10
  • Mail – Oct 10
  • In Person – Oct 31
Not available. 
West Virginia
  • Online – Oct 18
  • Mail – Oct 18
  • In Person – Oct 18
Not available. 
Wisconsin
  • Online- Not availale
  • Mail – Oct 19
  • In Person – Nov 8
You may also register in person on Election Day.
Wyoming (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online – Not available
  • Mail – Oct 24
  • In Person – Nov 8
You may also register in person on Election Day.

How to register to vote in United States, Where to register to vote in US, Am I registered to vote, Registered to vote ,Register vote ,Voter Registration 2016 US polls,How to register to vote 2016 US polls

How to register to vote in United States, Where to register to vote in US, Am I registered to vote, Registered to vote ,Register vote ,Voter Registration 2016 US polls,How to register to vote 2016 US polls

United States requires citizens to individually register to vote in the jurisdictions of residence. Some states accept citizen registration at the county level. The only exception is North Dakota, although local jurisdictions in North Dakota may create voter registration requirements.In most U.S. states, citizens registering to vote may declare an affiliation with a political party. This declaration of affiliation does not require the citizen to be a dues-paying member of a party, and may be changed at any time; declaration of affiliation also does not oblige voters to actually cast a ballot for that party's candidate(s) in an election. In many states, only voters affiliated with a party may vote in that party's primary elections, which are then called closed primaries.

Voting Rules in the U.S. Are Different in Every State

Register to Vote

If you need to register to vote, visit Vote.USA.gov. Depending on your state’s voter registration rules, the site can help you

Start Your Voter Registration

Check or Update Your Voter Registration: How, When, Why

If You’ve Recently Registered to Vote

If you’ve recently submitted a voter registration application, wait a few weeks for your voter registration card to arrive in the mail.

  • If there’s a problem with your application, you will be notified.
  • If you don’t receive any response, check with your state or local election office.


How to Check or Update Your Registration Information

  • Check your registration information, including your name, address, and political party, online at Can I Vote.
  • You may be able to update your registration information at Can I Vote.
  • You may have to register to vote again to update your registration information.
  • Contact your state or local election office for other ways to verify and update your registration information.

 


First Time Voters

First time voters who didn’t register in person and haven’t previously provided proof of ID are required by federal law to show some form of identification.

 

Who Can and Who Can’t Vote
Who Can Vote?

You can vote in U.S. elections if you:

 

  • Are a U.S. citizen
  • Meet your state’s residency requirements

     

    • You can be homeless and still meet these requirements.
  • Are 18 years old on or before Election Day

     

    • You can register to vote before you turn 18 if you will be 18 by Election Day. Check your state’s registration age requirements.
  • Register to vote by your state’s voter registration deadline

     

    • The one exception is for residents of North Dakota, which doesn’t have voter registration.

Who CAN’T Vote?

  •  Non-citizens, including permanent legal residents
  • For President in the general election: U.S. citizens residing in U.S. territories
  • Some people with felony convictions. Rules vary by state. Check with your state elections office about the laws in your state.
  • Some people who are mentally incapacitated. Rules vary by state.

Whose Options Are Limited Due to Primaries, Caucuses or Political Party?

No one’s. In the general election, you can vote for any Presidential candidate on the ballot from any party:

  1. Whether you voted in your state’s primaries or caucuses or not   
  2. Regardless of who you voted for in the primaries or caucuses
  3. Regardless of whether you’re registered with a political party or not

If you miss the deadline for an absentee ballot

If you’re registered to vote but don’t receive your absentee ballot in time, you can still submit a Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot (pdf) on the FVAP website, or with assistance from a US embassy or consulate. If your regular absentee ballot arrives later, send it back still—the FWAB will only count if the regular ballot doesn’t reach the intended state’s office.

Or, of course, you can return to the US to vote in your state.

Voter Registration Age Requirements by State

State Earliest Age
Alabama 18 on or before next election
Alaska Be at least 18 years old or within 90 days of your 18th birthday
Arizona 18 on or before next General Election
Arkansas 18 on before before next election
California 18 on or before next election
Colorado 18 before next election
Connecticut Be at least 17 and turning 18 before Election Day
Delaware 18 before next election
District of Columbia Be at least 17 years old, and turn 18 years old on or before the date of the next general election
Florida You can pre-register at 16, but you have to be 18 to vote
Georgia At least 17 1/2 years of age to register and 18 to vote.
Hawaii You can pre-register at 16, but you have to be 18 by election day to vote
Idaho 18 on or before next election
Illinois (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) Must be at least 18 years of age by Election Day; 17 years of age to vote in a General Primary if individual will be 18 as of the following General Election.
Indiana Be at least 18 years of age on or before the next General or Municipal Election.
Iowa 6 months before 18th birthday
Kansas (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) Reached the age of 18 before the next election.
Kentucky (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) 18 on or before next election
Louisiana Must be 17 years old (16 years old if registering in person at the registrar of voters office or at the Louisiana Office of Motor Vehicles), but must be 18 years old to vote.
Maine 18 by next General Election (note: you can vote at age 17 in a primary, if you'll be 18 by the next General Election)
Maryland You may register to vote if you are at least 16 years old but cannot vote unless you will be at least 18 years old by the next general election.
Massachusetts Be at least 18 years of age on or before the next election.
Michigan At least 18 years old by Election Day
Minnesota 18 on or before next election
Mississippi (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) 18 on or before next election
Missouri 17 ½ years of age to register, 18 years of age to vote
Montana 18 on or before next election
Nebraska (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) 18 years of age on or before the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November of the current calendar year.
Nevada 18 on or before next election
New Hampshire 18 on or before next election
New Jersey 17 years of age to register, 18 years of age to vote
New Mexico 17 years of age to pre-register, 18 years of age to vote
New York 18 by end of calendar year that you register (note: you must be 18 years old by the date of the general, primary or other election in which you want to vote).
North Carolina (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) 18 on or before next election
North Dakota No registration required. Must be at least 18 years old on the day of the election to vote.
Ohio Be at least 18 years old on or before the day of the general election.
Oklahoma 18 on or before next election
Oregon If you are 17 years of age, you will not receive a ballot until an election occurs on or after your 18th birthday.
Pennsylvania 18 on or before next election.
Rhode Island You can pre-register at 16, but you have to be 18 to vote
South Carolina 18 on or before next election
South Dakota 18 on or before next election
Tennessee 18 on or before next election
Texas Be at least 18 years old on election day.
Utah (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) You can preregister to vote if you are 16 or 17 years of age. Must be at least 18 years old on or before the next election to vote.
Vermont Must be 18 years old before election.
Virginia Be 18 years old (any person who is 17 years old and will be 18 years of age at the next general election shall be permitted to register in advance and also vote in any intervening primary or special election).
Washington 18 before next election.
West Virginia Must be 17 years old and 18 before the next general election. 17 year olds may register and vote in primary elections if they turn 18 before the next general election.
Wisconsin (PDF, Download Adobe Reader) Be at least 18 years of age on the day of the election to be eligible to vote. Persons who are otherwise eligible to vote may register to vote at 17 years of age if they will be 18 by the next election.
Wyoming 18 on or before next election.

Voter Registration Deadlines for the General Election by State

Find your state's voter registration deadlines for the Federal General Election—to be held on November 8, 2016—below. This page provides information taken from state election office websites as of October 14, 2016. This information can change due to holidays, natural disasters or other extensions applied in a state by state basis. We recommend contacting your local state election office to confirm. Or you can select your state name below to be taken directly to its election office website.

State Registration Deadline Election Day Registration
Alabama (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Oct 24
  • Mail-Oct 24
  • In Person- Oct 24
Not available. 
Alaska
  • Online- Oct 9
  • Mail- Oct 9
  • In Person- Oct 9
In a Presidential Election year, for November General Election only, you can register to vote on Election day.
Arizona (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Oct 10
  • Mail- Oct 8
  • In Person- Oct 10
 Not available. 
Arkansas (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online-  NA
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available. 
California
  • Online- Oct 24
  • Mail- Oct 24
  • In Person- Oct  24
 Not available.
Colorado (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Oct 31
  • Mail- Oct 31
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may also register in person on Election Day.
Connecticut (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Nov 1
  • Mail- Nov 1
  • In Person- Nov 1
You may also register in person on Election Day, but only at designated locations.
Delaware
  • Online- Oct 15
  • Mail- Oct 15
  • In Person- Oct 15
Not available. 
District of Columbia (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online – Oct 11
  • Mail – Oct 11
  • In Person – Nov 8
You may also register in person on Election Day as long as you can provide proof of residency.
Florida
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 18
  • In Person- Oct 18
Not available.
Georgia
  • Online- Oct 11
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available.
Hawaii
  • Online – Oct 10
  • Mail- Oct 10
  • In Person – Oct 10
Late registration available in person from Oct 25 – Nov 5. 
Idaho
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 14
  • In Person- Nov 14
You may also register in person on Election Day as long as you can provide proof of residency.
Illinois (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Oct 23
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may also register in person at designated locations on Election Day as long as you can provide proof of residency.
Indiana
  • Online- Oct 11
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 1
Not available. 
Iowa (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Oct 29
  • Mail- Oct 24
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may also register in person on Election Day as long as you can provide proof of residency and identification.
Kansas
  • Online- Oct 18
  • Mail- Oct 18
  • In Person- Oct 18
Not available. 
Kentucky
  • Online- Oct 11
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available. 
Louisiana
  • Online- Oct 11
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available. 
Maine
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 18
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may also register in person on or before Election Day.
Maryland
  • Online- Oct 18
  • Mail – Oct 18
  • In Person- Oct 18
*Same day registration is available during early voting period. 
Massachusetts
  • Online- Oct 19
  • Mail- Oct 19
  • In Person- Oct 19
Not available. 
Michigan (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- October 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available. 
Minnesota
  • Online- Oct 18
  • Mail- Oct 18
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may also register in person on Election Day as long as you can provide proof of residency.
Mississippi (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 8
  • In Person- Oct 8
Not available. 
Missouri
  • Online- Oct 12
  • Mail- Oct 12
  • In Person- Oct 12
Not available.
Montana
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may register in person at the county election office on Election Day.
Nebraska (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Oct 21
  • Mail- Oct 21
  • In Person- Oct 28
Not available. 
Nevada
  • Online- Oct 18
  • Mail- Oct 8
  • In Person- Oct 18
Not available. 
New Hampshire
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 29
  • In Person- Nov 8
You may register to vote on Election Day as long as the polls are open. 
New Jersey
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 18
  • In Person- Oct 18
Not available. 
New Mexico
  • Online- Oct 11
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available. 
New York
  • Online- Oct 14
  • Mail- Oct 14
  • In Person- Oct 14
Not available. 
North Carolina
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 14
  • In Person- Oct 14
Not available. 
North Dakota (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
Only state without voter registration. Learn about voting requirements in North Dakota. 
North Dakota is the only state without voter registration.
Ohio (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
*You can register and vote the same day during the early voting period. 
Oklahoma
  • Online- Not available
  • Mail- Oct 14
  • In Person- Oct 14
Not available. 
Oregon
  • Online- Oct 18
  • Mail- Oct 18
  • In Person- Oct 18

Not available. 
Pennsylvania
  • Online- Oct 11
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 11
Not available. 
Rhode Island
  • Online- Oct 9
  • Mail- Oct 9
  • In Person- Oct 9
You may register and vote for President/Vice-President only at your local Board of Canvassers on Election Day.
South Carolina
  • Online- Oct 9
  • Mail- Oct 11
  • In Person- Oct 8
Not available. 
South Dakota
  • Online – Not available
  • Mail- Oct 24
  • In Person-Oct 24
Not available. 
Tennessee
  • Online – Not available
  • Mail – Oct 11
  • In Person – Oct 11
Not available.
Texas
  • Online – Not available
  • Mail – Oct 11
  • In Person – Oct 11
Not available. 
Utah
  • Online – Nov 1
  • Mail – Oct 9
  • In Person – Nov 1
Not available.
Vermont
  • Online – Nov 2
  • Mail – Nov 2
  • In Person – Nov 2
Not available. 
Virginia
  • Online – Oct 17
  • Mail – Oct 17
  • In Person – Oct 17
Not available. 
Washington
  • Online – Oct 10
  • Mail – Oct 10
  • In Person – Oct 31
Not available. 
West Virginia
  • Online – Oct 18
  • Mail – Oct 18
  • In Person – Oct 18
Not available. 
Wisconsin
  • Online- Not availale
  • Mail – Oct 19
  • In Person – Nov 8
You may also register in person on Election Day.
Wyoming (PDF, Download Adobe Reader)
  • Online – Not available
  • Mail – Oct 24
  • In Person – Nov 8
You may also register in person on Election Day.

4 October vice presidential debate schedule details moderator 2016 Venue TV telecast Live, US Election Debate 2016, US First Election Debate in Farmville, When is second US Election Debate Venue, US Election Debate, US Election Debate Time, US Election Debate TV telecast live

4 October Vice presidential debate schedule details moderator 2016 Venue TV telecast Live, US Election Debate 2016, US First Election Debate in Farmville, When is second US Election Debate Venue, US Election Debate, US Election Debate Time, US Election Debate TV telecast live

How to watch on TV

If you have a TV and pay for cable, you’ll have a litany of options. The VP debate will be broadcast on all four major US networks along with several cable news channels:

  • ABC
  • CBS
  • NBC
  • Fox
  • C-SPAN
  • MSNBC
  • CNN
  • Fox News
  • Univision
  • PBS
  • CNBC

How to watch online

Same as the presidential debates, the VP debate will stream online on these three platforms:

  • Facebook (with ABC News coverage)
  • Twitter (with Bloomberg coverage)
  • YouTube (with coverage from PBS, Fox News, Telemundo, Bloomberg, NBC News, and Washington Post)

Second presidential debate

The formats for the 90-minute debates are designed to facilitate in-depth discussion of the leading issues facing the nation.

Vice presidential debate

Time: 9pm US eastern time (no commercial breaks​)
Moderator: Elaine Quijano, Anchor, CBSN and Correspondent, CBS News
Location: Longwood University, Farmville, VA

For Mr. Pence, the key challenge is to defend Donald J. Trump, the Republican presidential nominee, over some of his more outlandish comments, while also acquitting himself well as a reasonable, levelheaded conservative who could help rebuild the party whether Mr. Trump wins or loses. Mr. Kaine has already faced some tough questions about Hillary Clinton, the Democratic presidential nominee, on subjects like her use of a private email server and her trustworthiness. 

What to watch for in the VP debate:

It’s called the undercard debate for a reason. The buzz around Mike Pence and Tim Kaine’s vice-presidential debate on Tuesday pales in comparison to the anticipation surrounding the first presidential debate last week, which drew a record 84 million viewers. But that doesn’t mean the Pence-Kaine showdown, at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia, isn’t important.

The stakes are high for both candidates. Democrats are hoping Kaine, the junior senator from Virginia, can follow Hillary Clinton’s successful first debate with a strong showing of his own. Meanwhile, Mike Pence, Indiana’s governor, is under pressure to deliver a steady, policy-heavy debate to make up for Donald Trump’s erratic performance last week at Hofstra University. Here is what we’ll be watching for from both candidates in tomorrow’s debate.

  1. The debate will be divided into six time segments of approximately 15 minutes each on major topics to be selected by the moderator and announced at least one week before the debate.
  2. The moderator will open each segment with a question, after which each candidate will have two minutes to respond. Candidates will then have an opportunity to respond to each other. The moderator will use the balance of the time in the segment for a deeper discussion of the topic.
  3. All debates will be moderated by a single individual and will run from 9:00-10:30 p.m. Eastern Time without commercial breaks.
  4. As always, the moderators alone will select the questions to be asked, which are not known to the CPD or to the candidates.
  5. The moderators will have the ability both to extend the segments and to ensure that the candidates have equal speaking time.
  6. While the focus will properly be on the candidates, the moderator will regulate the conversation so that thoughtful and substantive exchanges occur. The CPD is in discussion with technology and civic groups that will provide data to the moderators to assist them in identifying the subjects that are most important to the public.

 

26 september presidential debate schedule details moderator 2016 Venue Venue TV telecast Live, US Election Debate 2016, US First Election Debate in NewYork, When is first US Election Debate Venue, US Election Debate, US Election Debate Time, US Election Debate TV telecast live

26th September US Presidential General Election Debate first 2016, US Election Debate 2016, US First Election Debate in NewYork, When is first US Election Debate Venue, US Election Debate, US Election Debate Venue, US Election Debate TV telecast live


First presidential debate

The formats for the 90-minute debates are designed to facilitate in-depth discussion of the leading issues facing the nation.

Debate TopicsAmerica’s Direction,” “Achieve Prosperity” “Securing America.

Place of debate: Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY

Time: 9:00-10:30 p.m  ET (The debate will air in the US at 9pm – which is 2am UK time.)

Early morning start in India--The debate will last an hour and 30 minutes, and will begin at 6:30 AM IST

Moderated by NBC's Nightly News anchor Lester Holt–"Holt is the first black journalist to moderate a presidential debate since 1992"

TV News Channel Which are covering: ABC News, C-SPAN & C-SPAN2, CBS, CBSN, CNN, Facebook Live, FOX (broadcast), FOX Business Network

Twitter: Free streams of Bloomberg’s coverage will be available on Twitter’s apps, as well as Twitter’s site; users won’t need a Twitter password to watch.

No ads— The broadcast of the debate won’t be interrupted by any commercial breaks

Clinton's objectives Clinton will rely on her considerable political experience, as well as her experiences during the Democratic primaries in 2016 and 2008 (when she ran against US President Obama for the Democratic nomination). She’ll try to project herself as an honest candidate – 55% of Americans don’t think she is – and try to connect emotionally with potential voters.
Trump's objectives Trump has never held a public office, and has only participated in this election season’s Republican Primary debates. He’ll try to show that he’s President material, and that he can get through a ninety-minute debate with Clinton, “without losing his self-control”, the report says

 Summary of Unites States First Presidential Debate:

  • Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump engaged in an occasionally raw series of clashes on topics from trade policy to the Iran deal to Trump’s taxes.
  • The Republican candidate came out swinging on Nafta and on, he said, his Democratic rival’s failed record of public service. His most aggressive attacks had Clinton appealing to “fact checkers” instead of offering rebuttals.
  • Clinton’s performance was magisterial. She slipped easily into the details of many policy areas – cyber warfare, community policing, paid family leave – that Trump could not touch.
  • Clinton’s best line (apart from “whew, OK!”): “I think Donald just criticized me for preparing for this debate. And yes I did. And you know what else I prepared for? I prepared to be president. And that’s a good thing.”
  • Clinton’s runner-up best line, in reply to a Trump charge that “we don’t have the money because it’s been squandered on your ideas”, was: “Maybe it’s because you haven’t paid your taxes!”

First presidential debate (September 26, 2016, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY)

  1. The debate will be divided into six time segments of approximately 15 minutes each on major topics to be selected by the moderator and announced at least one week before the debate.
  2. The moderator will open each segment with a question, after which each candidate will have two minutes to respond. Candidates will then have an opportunity to respond to each other. The moderator will use the balance of the time in the segment for a deeper discussion of the topic.
  3. All debates will be moderated by a single individual and will run from 9:00-10:30 p.m. Eastern Time without commercial breaks.
  4. As always, the moderators alone will select the questions to be asked, which are not known to the CPD or to the candidates.
  5. The moderators will have the ability both to extend the segments and to ensure that the candidates have equal speaking time.
  6. While the focus will properly be on the candidates, the moderator will regulate the conversation so that thoughtful and substantive exchanges occur. The CPD is in discussion with technology and civic groups that will provide data to the moderators to assist them in identifying the subjects that are most important to the public.

Hillary Clinton diagnosed with pneumonia, cancels California trip, Hillary Clinton Health issue, 9/11 memorial, pneumonia, New York City

Hillary Clinton diagnosed with pneumonia, cancels California trip, Hillary Clinton Health issue, 9/11 memorial, pneumonia, New York City

Hillary Clinton has been diagnosed with pneumonia by her personal doctor after the US Democratic presidential candidate fell ill at a 9/11 memorial.

The episode has renewed focus on her health less than two months before an election.

She was diagnosed on Friday, the doctor said, but her condition was not made public until Sunday afternoon.

Just hours earlier, a video was posted on social media, apparently showing Clinton stumbling and her knees buckling, before being helped by aides into a black van leaving the site of the September 11, 2001, attack in New York City.

She was taken to her daughter Chelsea's home in the city and appeared on her own about two hours later, wearing sunglasses and telling reporters that she was "feeling great".

'Major issue'


Clinton cancelled her campaign trip to California on Monday because of her diagnosis of pneumonia.

Al Jazeera's Kimberly Halkett, reporting from Washington DC, said Clinton's health would now become a "major issue" in the lead-up to the election, "elevated from the ranks of conspiracies to a legitimate campaign issue".

She noted that Sunday's event was Clinton's second health-related incident in a week.

Clinton's speech at a campaign rally on Labour Day in Cleveland was interrupted by a coughing spell. During the speech, she quipped: "Every time I think about Trump I get allergic."

She then resumed her speech.

Clinton has been in the news before for serious health issues.

In December 2012, she suffered a concussion and shortly afterward developed a blood clot.

In a letter released by her doctor in July 2015, Clinton was described as being in "excellent health" and "fit to serve" in the White House. It noted that her current medical conditions include hypothyroidism and seasonal pollen allergies.

The diagnosis and illness on Sunday come after some tough days for Clinton, as national polls showed her lead over Trump diminishing. A Reuters/Ipsos poll of likely voters showed an 8-point lead for Clinton had vanished by the last week of August.

On Saturday, Clinton came under fire from Republicans and on social media for saying Friday night that "half" of Trump's supporters belonged in a "basket of deplorables." She later said she regretted using the word "half."

Trump has also been under pressure to release detailed information on his health and medical history.

Instead, in December, Trump's doctor wrote in a short letter that was made public that his blood pressure and laboratory results "were astonishingly excellent" and that he would be "the healthiest individual ever elected to the presidency."

House Speaker Paul Ryan defeated Paul Nehlen to win Republican primary in Wisconsin, Paul Ryan , GOP Nomination, Donald Trump, Paul Nehlen, businessman, Wisconsin primary.

House Speaker Paul Ryan defeated Paul Nehlen to win Republican primary in Wisconsin, Paul Ryan,GOP Nomination, Donald Trump, Paul Nehlen, businessman, Wisconsin primary
House Speaker Paul Ryan on Tuesday defeated a long-shot Republican primary challenger who had been praised by Donald Trump.

Ryan beat businessman Paul Nehlen in Tuesday's Wisconsin primary. Nehlen had been courting Trump supporters and won praise from the Republican presidential nominee last week. But Trump endorsed Ryan days later.


"I'm humbled and honored that Wisconsinites in the 1st Congressional District support my efforts to keep fighting on their behalf," Ryan said in a statement to the Associated Press. Ryan said he and his wife, Janna, were grateful and thankful for the support.

Ryan had largely ignored Nehlen in what had been a sleepy primary before Trump thanked Nehlen on Twitter for his comments defending Trump. Nehlen won the backing of some prominent conservative figures, including former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, but it wasn't enough to overcome Ryan's popularity in his southeastern Wisconsin district.

Ryan had other advantages, including widespread popularity in the district where he was first elected in 1998. Ryan had also worked hard to maintain those home ties, traveling back to Janesville as much as possible to be with his wife and three children.

Nehlen, an executive at a water filtration company, first made a splash with a web video of him riding a Harley-Davidson motorcycle, showing his tattooed arms. He challenged Ryan to an arm-wrestling match if he wouldn't debate him.

He ran well to Ryan's right, accusing Ryan of betraying Trump and favoring a "globalist agenda" of disastrous trade deals and porous borders. Nehlen attracted support from Sarah Palin and conservative provocateur Ann Coulter, with the latter appearing alongside Nehlen in the district the weekend before the election.

In 2014, Paul Ryan got 94.27% of total vote in his party primary w/40,813 votes.

Highlights: 

10:33 – Politico calls it for Jason Lewis in MN-02. Probably a good call; Miller’s over 1200 votes behind with 41% of precincts reporting in a low-turnout primary.

10:24 – With 36% of precincts reporting in MN-02, Lewis’ lead has narrowed just a bit to 47/29 over Miller. It’s not quite over yet.

10:12 – The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel has called WI-08 for Gallagher. He’s up with 73% of the vote and 29% of precincts reporting.

10:05 – Meanwhile in MN-02, former radio host Jason Lewis is vying to win the nomination to succeed the retiring John Kline. Lewis appears to be running away with it with a 50/29 leadover Darlene Miller and 28% of precincts reporting.

10:00 – With 18% reporting in WI-08, Gallagher’s up with 75,4% of the vote. A bit too early to call, and the rural areas will be slow in reporting, but this looks pretty solid for now.

US County List, US Election Result By County, US Election Result by state, US Election Result by district, US Election Result by party, US Election Result list of counties, US Election Result area code, US Election Result History, US Population, US County Seat, US Density FIPS Code, US Voter statistics

US County List, US Election Result By County, US Election Result by state, US Election Result by district, US Election Result by party, US Election Result list of counties, US Election Result area code, US Election Result History, US Population, US County Seat, US Density FIPS Code, US Voter statistics

This is a complete list of the 3,142 counties and county equivalents of the United States of America as of July 1, 2013. For more detailed information, see the individual state lists shown below.

In the United States, a county is a political and geographic subdivision of a state.Of the 50 U.S. states, 48 states are divided into a total of 3,007 counties.The number of counties per state ranges from the three counties in Delaware to the 254 counties in Texas. The five counties in Rhode Island, the eight counties in Connecticut, and eight of the 14 counties in Massachusetts do not have a functional county government, but still exist as legal and census entities.

Instead of counties, Louisiana is divided into 64 parishes which are functionally similar to counties. Alaska is divided into 19 organized boroughs and a single Unorganized Borough. The United States Census Bureau has divided the Unorganized Borough of Alaska into 10 census areas for federal census and planning purposes.

The 38 cities in the state of Virginia are independent cities, which are not considered part of a particular county, and the states of Maryland, Missouri, California, and Nevada each have one independent city which is not considered part of a particular county. The Census Bureau and the Office of Management and Budget consider the 64 parishes, 19 organized boroughs, 10 census areas, 41 independent cities, and the District of Columbia, though not the Unorganized Borough, to be equivalent to counties for statistical purposes.

Here we have mentioned state wise county results and list of all counties in a particular state. We have also mentioned the Results area code, population, Density FIPS code, Voter statistics and Area of the County.

Click on the individual state to know more about a particular County of that state.

US Counties list
 Alabama Missouri
 Connecticut  Nebraska
 Nevada  New Hampshire 
Alaska  New Jersey
Arizona New Mexico 
Arkansas New York
California North Carolina
Colorado North Dakota 
Delaware  Ohio
Florida Oklahoma
Georgia Oregon
Hawaii  Pennsylvania
Idaho Rhode Island
Illinois South Carolina 
Indiana Tennessee
Iowa  Texas
Kansas Utah
Kentucky Vermont 
Louisiana Virginia
Maine  Washington
Maryland West Virginia
Massachusetts Wisconsin
Michigan Wyoming 
Minnesota   
Mississippi  

Montana Presidential Election Result By County by state by district by party list of counties Population area code Result History Seat Density FIPS Code Voter statistics

Find Latest Montana  Presidential Election Result By County by state by district by party list of counties Population area code Result History Seat Density FIPS Code Voter statistics


Click on individual county to get more details about Montana  counties Presidential Election Result by Party ,Population History, Voter statistics

This is a list of the 56 counties in the U.S. state of Montana. Montana has two consolidated city-counties—Anaconda with Deer Lodge County and Butte with Silver Bow County. The portion of Yellowstone National Park that lies within Montana was not part of any county until 1978, when part of it was nominally added to Gallatin County, and the rest of it to Park County. Eight counties of the state are composed of two or more words.

Montana  Presidential Election Result By County state district party

County FIPS County Code County seat Established Origin Population Area
Beaverhead County 1 Dillon 1864 Original County 9,345 5,543 sq mi
Big Horn County 3 Hardin 1913 Rosebud County,Yellowstone County 13,282 4,995 sq mi
Blaine County 5 Chinook 1895 Chouteau County 6,619 4,226 sq mi
Broadwater County 7 Townsend 1897 Jefferson County,Meagher County 5,667 1,192 sq mi
Carbon County 9 Red Lodge 1895 Park County,Yellowstone County 10,399 2,048 sq mi
Carter County 11 Ekalaka 1917 Fallon County 1,169 3,340 sq mi
Cascade County 13 Great Falls 1887 Chouteau County,Meagher County 82,344 2,698 sq mi
Chouteau County 15 Fort Benton 1865 Original County 5,894 3,973 sq mi
Custer County 17 Miles City 1865 Big Horn County 12,092 3,783 sq mi
Daniels County 19 Scobey 1920 Sheridan County,Valley County 1,793 1,426 sq mi
Dawson County 21 Glendive 1865 Unorganized lands 9,518 2,373 sq mi
Deer Lodge County 23 Anaconda 1864 Original County 9,150 737 sq mi
Fallon County 25 Baker 1913 Custer County 3,108 1,620 sq mi
Fergus County 27 Lewistown 1885 Original County 11,442 4,339 sq mi
Flathead County 29 Kalispell 1893 Missoula County 94,924 5,099 sq mi
Gallatin County 31 Bozeman 1864 Original County 97,308 2,507 sq mi
Garfield County 33 Jordan 1919 Dawson County 1,309 4,668 sq mi
Glacier County 35 Cut Bank 1919 Teton County 13,696 2,995 sq mi
Golden Valley County 37 Ryegate 1920 Musselshell County,Sweet Grass County 852 1,175 sq mi
Granite County 39 Philipsburg 1893 Deer Lodge County,Missoula County 3,209 1,728 sq mi
Hill County 41 Havre 1912 Chouteau County 16,596 2,896 sq mi
Jefferson County 43 Boulder 1864 Original County 11,558 1,657 sq mi
Judith Basin County 45 Stanford 1920 Cascade County,Fergus County 1,991 1,870 sq mi
Lake County 47 Polson 1923 Flathead County,Missoula County 29,099 1,494 sq mi
Lewis and Clark County 49 Helena 1864 Original County 65,856 3,461 sq mi
Liberty County 51 Chester 1920 Chouteau CountyHill County 2,359 1,430 sq mi
Lincoln County 53 Libby 1909 Flathead County 19,125 3,613 sq mi
McCone County 55 Circle 1919 Dawson County,Richland County 1,694 2,643 sq mi
Madison County 57 Virginia City 1864 Original County 7,820 3,587 sq mi
Meagher County 59 White Sulphur Springs 1867 Chouteau County,Gallatin County 1,853 2,392 sq mi
Mineral County 61 Superior 1914 Missoula County 4,257 1,220 sq mi
Missoula County 63 Missoula 1864 Original County 1,12,684 2,598 sq mi
Musselshell County 65 Roundup 1911 Fergus County,Meagher County,Yellowstone County 4,589 1,867 sq mi
Park County 67 Livingston 1887 Gallatin County 15,880 2,656 sq mi
Petroleum County 69 Winnett 1926 Fergus County 485 1,654 sq mi
Phillips County 71 Malta 1915 Blaine County,Valley County 4,192 5,140 sq mi
Pondera County 73 Conrad 1919 Chouteau County,Teton County 6,219 1,625 sq mi
Powder River County 75 Broadus 1919 Custer County 1,783 3,297 sq mi
Powell County 77 Deer Lodge 1901 Deer Lodge County 6,909 2,326 sq mi
Prairie County 79 Terry 1915 Dawson County,Fallon County 1,148 1,737 sq mi
Ravalli County 81 Hamilton 1893 Missoula County 41,030 2,394 sq mi
Richland County 83 Sidney 1914 Dawson County 11,576 2,084 sq mi
Roosevelt County 85 Wolf Point 1919 Sheridan County 11,332 2,356 sq mi
Rosebud County 87 Forsyth 1901 Custer County 9,326 5,012 sq mi
Sanders County 89 Thompson Falls 1905 Missoula County 11,364 2,762 sq mi
Sheridan County 91 Plentywood 1913 Valley County 3,696 1,677 sq mi
Silver Bow County 93 Butte 1881 Deer Lodge County 34,680 718 sq mi
Stillwater County 95 Columbus 1913 Carbon County,Sweet Grass County,Yellowstone County 9,290 1,795 sq mi
Sweet Grass County 97 Big Timber 1895 Meagher County,Park County,Yellowstone County 3,665 1,855 sq mi
Teton County 99 Choteau 1893 Chouteau County 6,064 2,273 sq mi
Toole County 101 Shelby 1914 Hill County,Teton County 5,150 1,911 sq mi
Treasure County 103 Hysham 1919 Rosebud County 692 979 sq mi
Valley County 105 Glasgow 1893 Dawson County 7,640 4,921 sq mi
Wheatland County 107 Harlowton 1917 Meagher County,Sweet Grass County 2,102 1,423 sq mi
Wibaux County 109 Wibaux 1914 Dawson County,Fallon County,Richland County 1,121 889 sq mi
Yellowstone County 111 Billings 1893 Custer County 1,55,634 2,635 sq mi

Trump’s major complaints about his debate schedule with Clinton, Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Presidential Debates, Presidential Debates schedule

Trump’s major complaints about his debate schedule with Clinton, Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Presidential Debates, Presidential Debates schedule

There are a couple of huge problems with Trump’s complaints: First, neither candidate nor political party had anything to do with this schedule. The presidential debates are set by the independent Commission on Presidential Debates a year in advance — in fact, this year’s schedule was set on September 23, 2015, seven months before the NFL released its schedule.


What’s more, there are all sorts of sporting events throughout September and October — including baseball playoff games. So it’s tough to find dates without any sort of conflict.

Note that the Commission on Presidential Debates has already said that it is not planning to change the schedule: "It is impossible to avoid all sporting events, and there have been nights on which debates and games occurred in most election cycles. A debate has never been rescheduled as a result."

So what’s Trump actually trying to accomplish by pushing this controversy? Here are a few possibilities.

1) Trump’s complaints about the debate are really just an excuse to attack Clinton

One possibility is that Trump isn’t really trying to change the debate schedule — he’s just attacking Clinton.

Candidates have often used debates as an excuse to attack their opponents. When George H.W. Bush was running for reelection in 1992, Bill Clinton attacked him as "Chicken George" for refusing to debate. Men in chicken costumes would attend Bush’s campaign rallies, the New York Times reported.

2) Trump is giving himself an out if he loses the debate — or laying the groundwork to skip

Another possibility is that Trump is worried about losing the debates — and this gives him an out if he does. He can just say the debates were "rigged" from the start. As Scacco puts it, "Trump is trying to lower expectations of his debate performance."

3) Trump just wants attention, and he doesn’t care how he gets it

The third possibility is that this is just Trump working the news cycle, as he always does. As my colleague Lind has written, Trump "truly does believe that ‘all publicity is good publicity.’ It’s how he’s conducted his entire career."

Trump’s second visit to Iowa since nomination, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump Iowa Campaign Rally Schedule, town hall rally,Mike Pence

Trump’s second visit to Iowa since nomination, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump Iowa Campaign Rally Schedule, town hall rally,Mike Pence

Iowa is becoming a regular stop on Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s travel schedule.

Trump is scheduled to appear at a town hall rally Friday afternoon in Des Moines after holding similar events in Davenport and Cedar Rapids last week that drew large crowds of supporters. Friday’s 3 p.m. appearance at the Iowa Events Center reportedly will include running mate, Indiana Gov.


Mike Pence, who would be making his first stop in Iowa since earning the vice presidential nomination at last month’s Republican National Convention in Cleveland.

"This week, Hillary Clinton laid out a five-point plan to build an economy that works for everyone — not just those at the top — that includes the largest investment in job creation the United States has seen since World War II,” she said.

“On the other hand, all Donald Trump has done this week is insult a Gold Star family, evade questions about why he manufactures products overseas, and kick a mother and her crying baby out of one of his rallies,” McGuire said.

Officials with the Clinton campaign said they did not have any information concerning any Iowa travel plans for the candidate since she landed her party’s 2016 nomination during last week’s Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

src:http://qctimes.com/news/local/government-and-politics/elections/trump-schedules-second-visit-to-iowa-since-nomination/article_abff6c19-6f39-5794-b588-d21ac039f801.html

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