Japan Demographics Population Religion Percentage by City Immigrants

Japan Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2019

Based on the census from October 2010, Japan's population was at its peak at 128,057,352.Japan Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017. As of October 1, 2015,Japan Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 the population was 127,094,745[2] making it the world's tenth-most populous country at the time. It had declined by 0.8 percent from the time of the census five years ago, the first time it had declined since the 1945 census. Mexico's population was slightly less than Japan's in 2015, with projections suggesting Mexico will soon pass Japan. Current statistics do not indicate much difference in population numbers.Japan's population size can be attributed to high growth rates experienced during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Since 2010, Japan has experienced net population loss due to falling birth rates and almost no immigration, despite having one of the highest life expectancies in the world, at 85.00 years as of 2016 (it was 81.25 as of 2006. Using the annual estimate for October of each year, the population peaked in 2008 at 128,083,960 and had fallen 285,256 by October 2011. Japan's population density was 336 people per square kilometer.

Based on 2012 data from the National Institute of Population and Social Security Research, Japan's population will keep declining by about one million people every year in the coming decades, which will leave Japan with a population of 42 million in 2110. More than 40% of the population is expected to be over age 65 in 2060. In 2012, the population had for six consecutive years declined by 212,000, the largest drop on record since 1947 and also a record low of 1.03 million births. In 2014, a new record of population drop happened with 268,000 people. In 2013, more than 20 percent of the population are age 65 and over.

 

Japan demographics Population by Religion

Religion in Japan is dominated by Shinto (the ethnic religion of the Japanese people) and by Buddhism. According to surveys carried out in 2006 and 2008, less than 40% of the population of Japan identifies with an organised religion: around 35% are Buddhists, 3% to 4% are members of Shinto sects and derived religions, and from fewer than 1% to 2.3% are Christians.[note 2] In 2009, an official survey showed that over half the Japanese families had a "butsudan" or Buddhist altar in their homes. A 2009 data from the Agency of Cultural Affairs stated that there were 89 million Buddhists in Japan. In 2011, it was reported that 90% of the Japanese identified as Buddhist or Shinto or a combination of both.

Religion in Japan (2006)

  Folk Shinto, or "not religious" (51.8%)

  Buddhism (34.9%)

  Shinto organizations and others (3.9%)

  Christianity (2.3%)

  No answer (7%)


 Japan demographics Population by Immigrants

According to the Japanese immigration centre, the number of foreign residents in Japan has steadily increased, and the number of foreign residents (excluding a small number of illegal immigrants and short-term visitors, such as foreign nationals staying less than 90 days in Japan), exceeded 2.2 million people in 2008.

In 2010, the number of foreigners in Japan was 2,134,151. This includes 209,373 Filipinos, many of whom are married to Japanese nationals, 210,032 Brazilians, the majority possessing some degree of Japanese ancestry, 687,156 Chinese and 565,989 Koreans. Chinese, Filipinos, Koreans, and Brazilians account for about 69.5% of foreign residents in Japan.

The current issue of the shrinking workforce in Japan alongside its aging population have resulted in a recent need to attract foreign labor to the country. Reforms which took effect in 2015 relax visa requirements for "Highly Skilled Foreign Professionals" and create a new type of residence status with an unlimited period of stay.

The number of naturalizations peaked in 2008 at 16,000, declining to over 9,000 in the most recent year for which data are available. Most of the decline is accounted for by a steep reduction in the number of Japan-born Koreans taking Japanese citizenship. Historically the bulk of those taking Japanese citizenship have not been foreign-born immigrants but rather Japanese-born descendants of Koreans and Taiwanese who lost their citizenship in the Japanese Empire in 1947 as part of the American Occupation policy for Japan.


 Japan demographics Population by Race
.

Ethnic groups of Japan

%age

 Ethnic Japanese

98.50%

Koreans

0.50%

Chinese

0.40%

other

0.60%

Japan Population by City
.

Rank

City

Metro Population

1

Greater Tokyo-Kanto

36.9 Million

2

Keihanshin (Kobe-Kyoto-Osaka)

19.3 Million

3

Nagoya

9.1 Million

4

Fukuoka

5.5 Million

5

Shizuoka

2.7 Million

6

Sapporo

2.6 Million

7

Sendai

2.2 Million

8

Hiroshima

2.1 Million

9

Utsunomiya

1.7 Million

10

Okayama

1.6 Million

 

Singapore Demographics Population Religion Percentage by City Immigrants

Singapore Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2019

The demographics of Singapore include the population statistics of Singapore such as population density, Singapore Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 ethnicity, education level, health of the populace, economic status, religious affiliations and other demographic data of the population.

As of January 2017, the island's population stood at 5.75 million. A large percentage of its population are non-residents; of its total population of 5.47 million in 2014, 3.87 million were residents (citizens plus permanent residents), 1.6 million non-residents. It is the second densest sovereign state in the world, after the microstate Monaco. Singapore is a multiracial and multicultural country with ethnic Chinese (76.2% of the citizen population), indigenous Malays (15.0%), and ethnic Indians (7.4%) making up the majority of the population. There are also Eurasians in Singapore. The Malays are recognised as the indigenous community. Since independence the demographics of Singapore are broadly organised under the CMIO (Chinese-Malay-Indian-Other) system of categorisation.

 

Singapore demographics Population by Religion

The main religions of Singapore are Buddhism and Daoism, Islam, Christianity, and Hinduism, with a significant number who profess no religion.

Singapore generally allows religious freedom, although the authorities restrict or ban some religious sects (such as Jehovah's Witnesses, due to their opposition to National Service). The majority of Malays are Muslim, the plurality of Chinese practise Buddhism and syncretic Chinese folk traditions. Christianity is growing among the Chinese, having overtaken Taoism as second most important religion in the 2000 census among this ethnic group as more Chinese increasingly described themselves as Buddhists rather than Taoist. Indians are mostly Hindus though many are Muslims, Sikhs, and Christians. People who practise no religion form the third-largest group in Singapore.

Religion in Singapore (census 2015)

  Buddhism (33.2%)

  Taoism and folk religion (10.0%)

  None (18.5%)

  Christianity (18.8%)

  Islam (14.0%)

  Hinduism (5.0%)

  Sikhism and other (0.6%)


 Singapore demographics Population by Immigrants

The population of Singapore can be divided into two categories of people according to the permanency of their stay: Citizens (including naturalized citizens) and permanent residents are referred to as “residents,” while immigrants who are in Singapore temporarily (such as students and certain workers) are considered “non-residents.” Permanent residents (PRs), while typically immigrants as well, have been granted the right to reside permanently in Singapore and are entitled to most of the rights and duties of citizens, including eligibility for government-sponsored housing and mandatory military service for young adult males, though not the right to vote in general elections.

 

The non-resident population increased at an unprecedented pace in the first decade of the 21st century, according to the 2010 Singapore census. During this period, it accounted for 25.7 percent of the total population, up from 18.7 percent in the previous decade (Table 1). As of 2010, the non-resident population stood at 1,305,011 out of a total population of 5,076,732.


 Singapore demographics Population by Race
.

Ethnic groups in Singapore (2013)

Ethnic groups

%age

Chinese

74.20%

Malay

13.30%

Indian

9.20%

Other

3.30%

Singapore Population by City
.

City

Population

Singapore

3547809

 

China Demographics Population Religion Percentage by City Immigrants

China Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2019 by City Immigrants

China Demographics Population Religion Percentage

The demographics of the People's Republic of China are identified by a large population with a relatively small youth division, China Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017which was partially a result of China's one-child policy. China's population reached the billion mark in 1982.

China's population is 1.404 billion, the largest of any country in the world. According to the 2010 census, 91.51% of the population was Han Chinese, and 8.49% were minorities. China's population growth rate is only 0.47%, ranking 159th in the world. China conducted its sixth national population census on 1 November 2010.Unless otherwise indicated, the statistics on this page pertain to mainland China only; see also Demographics of Hong Kong and Demographics of Macau.

 

 

 

China demographics Population by Religion

China demographics Population by Religion

Religion

Percentage%

Chinese folk religions and Taoism

80%

Buddhists

10-16%

Christians

2-4%

Muslims

1-2%


 China demographics Population by Immigrants

Internal migration in the People's Republic of China is one of the most extensive in the world according to the InternationalChina Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 Labour Organization. In fact, research done by Kam Wing Chan of the University of Washington suggests that "In the 30 years since 1979, China's urban population has grown by about 440 million to 622 million in 2009. Of the 440 million increase, about 340 million was attributable to net migration and urban reclassification. Even if only half of that increase was migration, the volume of rural-urban migration in such a short period is likely the largest in human history." Migrants in China are commonly members of a floating population, which refers primarily to migrants in China without local household registration status through the Chinese Hukou system. In general, rural-urban migrant workers are most excluded from local educational resources, citywide social welfare programs and many jobs because of their lack of hukou status.

In 2011 a total of 252.78 million migrant workers (an increase of 4.4% compared to 2010) existed in China. Out of these, migrant workers who left their hometown and worked in other provinces accounted for 158.63 million (an increase of 3.4% compared to 2010) and migrant workers who worked within their home provinces reached 94.15 million (an increase of 5.9% compared to 2010). Estimations are that Chinese cities will face an influx of another 243 million migrants by 2025, taking the urban population up to nearly 1 billion people. This population of migrants would represent "almost 40 percent of the total urban population," a number which is almost three times the current level.While it is often difficult to collect accurate statistical data on migrant floating populations, the number of migrants is undoubtedly quite large. “In China’s largest cities, for instance, it is often quoted that at least one out of every five persons is a migrant.” China's government influences the pattern of urbanization through the Hukou permanent residence registration system, land-sale policies, infrastructure investment, and the incentives offered to local government officials. The other factors influencing migration of people from rural provincial areas to large cities are employment, education, business opportunities and higher standard of living.


 China demographics Population by Race
.

Population of China according to ethnic group in censuses 2000–2010

Ethnic group

Language family

2000

 %

2010

 %

Han

Chinese

1,137,386,112

91.53

1,220,844,520

91.6

Minority groups

 

105,225,173

8.47

111,966,349

8.4

Zhuang

Tai-Kadai

16,178,811

1.28

16,926,381

1.27

Hui

Chinese

9,816,802

0.78

10,586,087

0.79

Manchu

Tungusic

10,682,263

0.84

10,387,958

0.78

Others

5.56

China Population by City
.

S.No.

City

Population

1

Shanghai

24,100,000

2

Beijing

21,500,000

3

Guangzhou

20,800,654

4

Chongqing

18,384,000

5

Chengdu

17,677,122

6

Tianjin

15,469,500

7

Shenzhen

12,357,938

8

Harbin

12,000,000

9

Wuhan

10,670,000

10

Suzhou

10,349,090

 

India Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 by City Immigrants

India Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017

India Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017

India is projected to be the world's most populous country by 2022, surpassing the population of China.India Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 During 1975-2010 the population doubled to 1,200 million. It is expected to become the first political entity in history to be home to more than 1.5 billion people by 2030, and its population is set to reach 1.7 billion by 2050. Its population growth rate is 1.2%, ranking 94th in the world in 2013. The Indian population reached the billion mark in 1998. India has more than 50% of its population below the age of 25 and more than 65% below the age of 35. It is expected that, in 2020, the average age of an Indian will be 29 years, compared to 37 for China and 48 for Japan; and, by 2030, India's dependency ratio should be just over 0.4.

India has more than two thousand ethnic groups,and every major religion is represented, as are four major families of languages (Indo-European, Dravidian, Austroasiatic and Sino-Tibetan languages) as well as two language isolates (the Nihali language spoken in parts of Maharashtra and the Burushaski language spoken in parts of Jammu and Kashmir (Kashmir). Further complexity is lent by the great variation that occurs across this population on social parameters such as income and education. Only the continent of Africa exceeds the linguistic, genetic and cultural diversity of the nation of India.

India demographics Population by Religion

 There are six religions in India which have been awarded "National minority" status—Muslims, Christians, Sikhs, Jains, Buddhists and Zoroastrians.

Religious group

Population

1951%

1961%

1971%

1981%

1991%

2001%

% 2011[53]

Hinduism

84.10%

83.45%

82.73%

82.30%

81.53%

80.46%

79.80%

Islam

9.80%

10.69%

11.21%

11.75%

12.61%

13.43%

14.23%

Christianity

2.30%

2.44%

2.60%

2.44%

2.32%

2.34%

2.30%

Sikhism

1.79%

1.79%

1.89%

1.92%

1.94%

1.87%

1.72%

Buddhism

0.74%

0.74%

0.70%

0.70%

0.77%

0.77%

0.70%

Jainism

0.46%

0.46%

0.48%

0.47%

0.40%

0.41%

0.37%

Zoroastrianism

0.13%

0.09%

0.09%

0.09%

0.08%

0.06%

n/a

Others/Religion not specified

0.43%

0.43%

0.41%

0.42%

0.44%

0.72%

0.90%


 India demographics Population by Immigrants

The number of foreign immigrants living in India is steadily declining, but India continues to be among the 10 countries with the highest in-migration in the world. At the same time, India sends the fourth largest number of emigrants to other countries.

In 2010, there were 5.4 million foreign-born people living in India, according to new estimates released by the Population Division of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs. These numbers make India home to the ninth largest number of foreign-born people in the world.

But this number has been in decline since post-Partition migration and an influx of refugees from Bangladesh following the 1971 war.

There were 7.5 million foreign-born persons living in India in 1990. By 2000, this number was down to 6.4 million on account of the death of these older immigrants and refugees.

While a source country-wise break-up is not available for immigrants in India in 2010, past trends indicate that the likes of French diplomats in Delhi, American investment bankers in Mumbai and British techies in Bangalore form a tiny part of this diaspora. In the 2001 census, 97% of all immigrants were from south Asian countries. Three million were from Bangladesh alone, followed by a million from Pakistan and 600,000 from Nepal.


 India demographics Population by Race
.

According to a 2009 study published by Reich et al., the modern Indian population is composed of two genetically divergent and heterogeneous populations which mixed in ancient times (about 1,200–3,500 BC), known as Ancestral North Indians (ANI) and Ancestral South Indians (ASI). ASI corresponds to the Dravidian-speaking population of southern India, whereas ANI corresponds to the Indo-Aryan-speaking population of northern India.

For a list of ethnic groups in the Republic of India (as well as neighbouring countries) see ethnic groups of the Indian subcontinent.

Linguistic groups in India chart

  Indo-Aryan (75%)

  Dravidian (20%)

  Austroasiatic, Sino-Tibetan, Tai-Kadai and others (5%)

India Population by City
.

S.No.

City

Population

Metropolitan

Literacy

1

Mumbai

12442373

18414288

89.73

2

Delhi

11034555

16314838

87.59

3

Bangalore

8443675

8499399

88.71

4

Hyderabad

6731790

7749334

83.26

5

Ahmedabad

5577940

6352254

88.29

6

Chennai

4646732

8696010

90.18

7

Kolkata

4496694

14112536

86.31

8

Surat

4467797

4585367

87.89

9

Pune

3124458

5049968

89.56

10

Jaipur

3046163

3046163

83.33

 

Alabama US Muslim Population Percentage 2017 By City Demographics Religion

Alabama USA United States Muslim Population Percentage 2017 By City Demographics

Islam is the third largest religion in the United States after Christianity and Judaism.
According to a 2010 study, Muslim Population is – 0.9% of the total US population, compared with 70.6% who follow Christianity, 22.8% unaffiliated, 1.9% Judaism, 0.7% Buddhism, and 0.7% Hinduism. According to a newer estimate done in 2016, there were 3.3 million Muslims living in the United States, about 1% of the total U.S. population

Religion Percentage
Christianity 70.6%
Unaffiliated 22.8%
Judaism 1.9%
Islam 0.9%
Hinduism 0.7%
Buddhism 0.7%


According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Alabama's 2000 population was 4,447,100. As of the 2010 census, Alabama has a population of 4,802,740, which is an increase of 23,004, or 0.48%, from the prior year and an increase of 332,636 or 7.5%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 87,818 people (that is 375,808 births minus 287,990 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 73,178 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 30,537 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 42,641 people.


From the 1880s to 1914, several thousand Muslims immigrated to the United States from the former territories of the Ottoman Empire and the former Mughal Empire. The Muslim population of the U.S. increased dramatically in the 20th century, with much of the growth driven by a comparatively high birth rate and immigrant communities of mainly Arab and South Asian descent. About 72% of American Muslims are immigrants or "second generation".

 


Alabama USA United States Muslim Population By States Demographics Religion

Second Largest Religion in Alabama by Counties

Religion

 

 

 

 

No Of County
Islam (Muslim) 11
Buddhism 2
Hinduism 2
Judaism 2
Baha 1
Adherents Reported 34
No Presence 15

 


Alabama US Muslim Population by County

When broken down to the county level, it’s easy to see just how dominant Christianity is in Alabama.
In 15 counties in the state, other religions do not even have a large enough presence to be statistically relevant. Documenting the second largest religion in 34 Alabama counties is reliant on potentially sketchy data supplied by faiths that keep track of their adherents through mailing lists, rather than congregations.
Interestingly, Judaism has a strong presence in Jefferson and Montgomery counties, but is almost non-existent in the rest of the state. Meanwhile, Hinduism is the second-largest religious bloc in Shelby and Limestone, And Buddhism has pockets of activity in Russell and Tallapoosa counties.

 

Alabama Demographics population by Race  


Live Births by Race/Ethnicity of Mother

 
Race 2013 2014 2015
White: 38,971 (67.0%) 39,578 (66.6%) 39,845 (66.8%)
Non-Hispanic White 35,086 (60.3%) 35,929 (60.5%) 35,826 (60.1%)
Black 18,014 (31.0%) 18,417 (31.0%) 18,429 (30.9%)
Asian 973 (1.7%) 1,227 (2.1%) 1,193 (2.0%)
Native 209 (0.3%) 200 (0.3%) 190 (0.3%)
Hispanic (of any race) 4,002 (6.9%) 4,019 (6.8%) 4,295 (7.2%)
Total Alabama 58,167 (100%) 59,422 (100%) 59,657 (100%)

List of all Muslim Majority Cities in US. 

New York City – 69,985 (2000)

Michigan – 29,181 (2000)

Los Angeles – 25,673 (2000)

New Jersey, – 25,000 to 30,000 (2000)

Philadelphia, – 30,000 to 50,000 Muslims (2012)

Paterson, New Jersey – 20,000 in (2015)

US Muslim Population Percentage 2017

Alabama US Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 by City Immigrants

Alabama US Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 by City Immigrants

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Alabama's 2000 population was 4,447,100. As of the 2010 census, Alabama has a population of 4,802,740, which is an increase of 23,004, or 0.48%, from the prior year and an increase of 332,636 or 7.5%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 87,818 people (that is 375,808 births minus 287,990 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 73,178 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 30,537 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 42,641 people.
As of 2004 Alabama had 108,000 foreign-born (2.4% of the state population), of which an estimated 22.2% were undocumented immigrants (24,000). In 2006, Alabama had a larger percentage of tobacco smokers than the national average, with 23% of adults smoking.

Alabama Population by Religion Followed

  1. Christian – 84%
  2. Protestant – 61%
  3. Baptist – 37%
  4. Jewish – 1%
  5. Other religions – 3%
  6. No religion – 6%
  7. Refused – 6%

  Alabama US demographics Population by Race
.

Historically, African Americans were brought to Alabama as slaves, in greatest numbers in the cotton-producing plantation region known as the Black Belt. This region remains predominantly African American, where many freedmen settled to work at agriculture after the Civil War. The northern part of the state, originally settled by small farmers with fewer slaves, is predominantly European American. The Port of Mobile, founded by the French and subsequently controlled by England, Spain, and the United States, has long had an ethnically diverse population. It has long served as an entry point for various groups settling in other parts of the state. Those citing "American" ancestry in Alabama are of overwhelmingly English extraction, however most English Americans identify simply as having American ancestry because their roots have been in North America for so long, in many cases since the early sixteen hundreds. Demographers estimate that a minimum of 20–23% of people in Alabama are of predominantly English ancestry and state that the figure is probably much higher. In the 1980 census 1,139,976 people in Alabama cited that they were of English ancestry out of a total state population of 2,824,719 making them 41% of the state at the time and the largest ethnic group. There are also many more people in Alabama of Scots-Irish origins than are self-reported. Many people in Alabama claim Irish ancestry because of the term "Scots-Irish", but most of the time in Alabama this term is used for those with Scottish roots, rather than Irish.

 

 

 

 

Demographics of Alabama

 

 

 

 

       
By race White Black AIAN* Asian NHPI*
2000 (total population) 72.56% 26.33% 1.00% 0.89% 0.07%
2000 (Hispanic only) 1.48% 0.18% 0.04% 0.02% 0.01%
2005 (total population) 72.14% 26.70% 0.98% 1.02% 0.07%
2005 (Hispanic only) 2.08% 0.17% 0.05% 0.03% 0.01%
Growth 2000–05 (total population) 1.90% 3.95% -0.06% 17.43% 4.90%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only) 1.02% 3.97% -0.55% 17.47% 6.67%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only) 43.85% 1.05% 11.46% 16.20% -2.17%

Live Births by Race/Ethnicity of Mother

 

 

Live Births by Race/Ethnicity of Mother

 

 

 
Race 2013 2014 2015
White: 38,971 (67.0%) 39,578 (66.6%) 39,845 (66.8%)
Non-Hispanic White 35,086 (60.3%) 35,929 (60.5%) 35,826 (60.1%)
Black 18,014 (31.0%) 18,417 (31.0%) 18,429 (30.9%)
Asian 973 (1.7%) 1,227 (2.1%) 1,193 (2.0%)
Native 209 (0.3%) 200 (0.3%) 190 (0.3%)
Hispanic (of any race) 4,002 (6.9%) 4,019 (6.8%) 4,295 (7.2%)
Total Alabama 58,167 (100%) 59,422 (100%) 59,657 (100%)

Alabama Historical Population Figure Till Date

Year

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pop. ±%
1800 1250 —    
1810 9046 623.70%
1820 127901 1313.90%
1830 309527 142.00%
1840 590756 90.90%
1850 771623 30.60%
1860 964201 25.00%
1870 996992 3.40%
1880 1262505 26.60%
1890 1513401 19.90%
1900 1828697 20.80%
1910 2138093 16.90%
1920 2348174 9.80%
1930 2646248 12.70%
1940 2832961 7.10%
1950 3061743 8.10%
1960 3266740 6.70%
1970 3444165 5.40%
1980 3893888 13.10%
1990 4040587 3.80%
2000 4447100 10.10%
2010 4779736 7.50%
2016 4863300 1.70%

  Alabama US demographics Population by Immigrants

 


 Alabama US Population by City
.

US Map Eelctions 

Croatia Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 by City Immigrants

Croatia Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017

The demographic characteristics of the population of CroatiaCroatia Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 are known through censuses, normally conducted in ten-year intervals and analysed by various statistical bureaus since the 1850s. The Croatian Bureau of Statistics has performed this task since the 1990s. The latest census in Croatia was performed in April 2011. The permanent population of Croatia at the 2011 census had reached 4.29 million. The population density is 75.8 inhabitants per square kilometre, and the overall life expectancy in Croatia at birth was 78 years in 2012. The population rose steadily (with the exception of censuses taken following the two world wars) from 2.1 million in 1857 until 1991, when it peaked at 4.7 million. Since 1991, Croatia's death rate has continuously exceeded its birth rate; the natural growth rate of the population is negative. Croatia is in the fourth or fifth stage of the demographic transition. In terms of age structure, the population is dominated by the 15- to 64-year-old segment. The median age of the population is 41.4, and the gender ratio of the total population is 0.93 males per 1 female.

 

 

Croatia demographics Population by Religion

Religion in Croatia (2011 census)

  Roman Catholicism (86.28%)

  Eastern Orthodoxy (4.44%)

  Irreligion (3.81%)

  Others (3.66%)

  Islam (1.47%)

  Protestantism (0.34%)

 


  Croatia demographics Population by Immigrants

The demographic history of Croatia is characterised by significant migrations, starting with the arrival of the Croats in the area. According to the work De Administrando Imperio written by the 10th-century Byzantine Emperor Constantine VII, the Croats arrived in the area of modern-day Croatia in the early 7th century. However, that claim is disputed, and competing hypotheses date the event between the 6th and the 9th centuries. Following the establishment of a personal union of Croatia and Hungary in 1102, and the joining of the Habsburg Empire in 1527, the Hungarian and German speaking population of Croatia began gradually increasing in number. The processes of Magyarization and Germanization varied in intensity but persisted to the 20th century. The Ottoman conquests initiated a westward migration of parts of the Croatian population; the Burgenland Croats are direct descendants of some of those settlers. To replace the fleeing Croats the Habsburgs called on the Orthodox populations of Bosnia and Serbia to provide military service in the Croatian Military Frontier. Serb migration into this region peaked during the Great Serb Migrations of 1690 and 1737–39. Similarly, Venetian Republic rule in Istria and in Dalmatia, following the Fifth and the Seventh Ottoman–Venetian Wars ushered gradual growth of Italian speaking population in those areas. Following the collapse of Austria-Hungary in 1918, the Hungarian population declined, especially in the areas north of the Drava river, where they represented the majority before World War.


  Croatia demographics Population by Race
.

Religion in Croatia

Religion

Percent

Roman Catholicism

86.28%

Eastern Orthodoxy

4.44%

Islam

1.47%

Protestantism

0.34%

Atheism or Agnosticism

4.57%

Others and unspecified

3.24%

 Croatia Population by City
.

S.No.

Name

Population

1

Zagreb 

698,966

2

Split 

176,314

3

Rijeka

141,172

4

Osijek

88,140

5

Zadar

71,258

6

Slavonski Brod

60,742

7

Pula

59,078

8

Sesvete 

52,411

9

Karlovac, Karlovacka

48,123

10

Karlovac 

46,833

Ireland Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 by City Immigrants

Ireland Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017

The island of Ireland,Ireland Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 throughout most of its history, had a small population, comparable to that of other regions of similar area in Europe. In the 18th and early 19th centuries, Ireland experienced a major population boom as a result of the Agricultural and Industrial Revolutions. In the 50-year period 1790-1840, the population of the island doubled from 4 million to 8 million. At its peak, Ireland's population density was similar to that of England and continental Europe.

This changed dramatically with the Great Famine of the mid-19th century, which led to mass starvation and consequent mass emigration. In the area covering the present day Republic of Ireland, the population reached about 6.5 million in the mid 1840s. Ten years later it was down to 5 million. The population continued a slow decline well into the 20th century, with the Republic recording a low of 2.8 million in the 1961 census.

The Republic of Ireland had a population of 4,757,976 at the 2016 census.

 

 

 Ireland demographics Population by Religion

Religions in the Republic of Ireland, 2016

  Roman Catholicism (78.3%)

  Church of Ireland (2.6%)

  Islam (1.3%)

  Orthodox Christianity (1.3%)

  Presbyterian (0.5%)

  Hindu (0.3%)

  Apostolic or Pentecostal (0.2%)

  Not Stated or Other (5.7%)

  No Religion (9.8%)

 


  Ireland demographics Population by Immigrants

Country of Birth

Immigrants in the Republic of Ireland (2016 Census)

European Union Poland

122,515

European Union United Kingdom

103,115

European Union Lithuania

36,552

European Union Romania

29,186

European Union Latvia

19,933

 Brazil

13,640

European Union Spain

12,112

European Union Italy

11,732

European Union France

11,661

European Union Germany

11,531

 India

11,465

 United States

10,519

European Union Slovakia

9,717

 China

9,575

 


  Ireland demographics Population by Race
.

Ireland demographics Population by Race

Irish

84.50%

Other White

9.80%

Asian

1.90%

Black

1.40%

Mixed and Other

0.90%

Unspecified

1.60%

 Ireland Population by City
.

S.No.

Name

Population

1

Dublin 

1,024,027

2

Cork 

190,384

3

Dún Laoghaire 

185,400

4

Limerick 

90,054

5

Galway 

70,686

6

Tallaght 

64,282

7

Waterford

47,904

8

Swords 

36,924

9

Drogheda

33,441

10

Dundalk

33,428

Norway Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 by City Immigrants

Norway Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017

Norway is a Scandinavian country Norway Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017encompassing mountains, glaciers and deep coastal fjords. Oslo, the capital, is a city of green spaces and museums. Preserved 9th-century Viking ships are displayed at Oslo’s Viking Ship Museum. Bergen, with colorful wooden houses, is the starting point for cruises to the dramatic Sognefjord. Norway is also known for fishing, hiking and skiing, notably at Lillehammer’s Olympic resort.

The total population of Norway on 1 January 2017 was 5,258,317. Statistics Norway estimated that the 5,000,000 milestone was reached 19 March 2012. Norway has one of the highest fertility rates in Europe, but the rate has decreased from 1.98 in 2009 to 1.71 in 2016.

 

 

 Norway demographics Population by Religion

Religions in Norway (2013)

  Church of Norway (76.09%)

  Roman Catholic Church (2.40%)

  Pentecostal congregations (0.78%)

  Swedish Margareta Congregation in Oslo (0.41%)

  Evangelical Lutheran Free Church (0.39%)

  Other Christian denominations (2.22%)

  Islam (2.39%)

  Other religions (0.59%)

  Humanism (1.70%)

  Unaffiliated (13.03%)


  Norway demographics Population by Immigrants

According to Statistics Norway, Norway's immigrant population makes up 16.8% of the country's total population [January, 2017]. This includes immigrants and children born in Norway to two immigrant parents. The five largest immigrant groups in Norway are in turn Polish, Lithuanian, Swedish, Somali, and Pakistani.At the beginning of 1992, the immigrant population in Norway was 183,000 people (4.3% of the total population). At the beginning of 2015, this number had risen to 815,000 people (15.6% of the total population). Immigration to Norway has increased drastically in recent years, with net immigration exceeding 40,000.


  Norway demographics Population by Race
.

Religion

Members

Percent

Christianity

4,148,389

79.60%

The Church of Norway (Lutheran)

3,799,366

72.90%

Roman Catholicism

144,856

2.80%

Pentecostalism

39,431

0.80%

The Swedish Church in Norway

21,689

0.40%

Orthodox Christianity

20,202

0.40%

The Free Lutheran Church

18,908

0.40%

Jehovah's Witnesses

12,413

0.20%

The Mission Society

10,598

0.20%

Methodism

10,531

0.20%

Baptists

10,367

0.20%

Other Christianity

60,088

1.20%

Non-Christian religions

183,201

3.50%

Islam

148,189

2.80%

Buddhism

18,817

0.40%

Hinduism

8,882

0.20%

Sikhism

3,545

0.10%

Bahá'í Faith

1,149

0.00%

Judaism

770

0.00%

Other religions

1,849

0.00%

Non-religious and unknown

792,637

15.20%

Humanism

89,758

1.70%

Total

5,213,985

100.00%

 Norway Population by City
.

Rank

Urban area

Population

County

1

Oslo

958,378

Oslo/Akershus/Buskerud

2

Bergen

250,420

Hordaland

3

Stavanger/Sandnes

210,874

Rogaland

4

Trondheim

175,068

Sør-Trøndelag

5

Drammen

113,534

Buskerud

6

Fredrikstad/Sarpsborg

108,636

Østfold

7

Porsgrunn/Skien

91,737

Telemark

8

Kristiansand

60,583

Vest-Agder

9

Ålesund

50,917

Møre og Romsdal

10

Tønsberg

50,806

Vestfold

11

Moss

45,586

Østfold

12

Haugesund

43,909

Rogaland

13

Arendal

42,690

Aust-Agder

14

Sandefjord

42,650

Vestfold

15

Bodø

39,750

Nordland

16

Tromsø

33,883

Troms

17

Hamar

26,533

Hedmark

18

Halden

24,895

Østfold

19

Larvik

23,715

Vestfold

20

Askøy

22,311

Hordaland

21

Kongsberg

21,342

Buskerud

22

Harstad

20,770

Troms

23

Molde

20,602

Møre og Romsdal

24

Horten

20,164

Vestfold

25

Gjøvik

19,935

Oppland

Belarus Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 by City Immigrants

Belarus Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017

The demographics of BelarusBelarus Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 is about the demographic features of the population of Belarus, including population growth, population density, ethnicity, education level, health, economic status, religious affiliations, and other aspects of the population. The ethnic majority in Belarus are called Belarusians. The population of Belarus suffered a dramatic decline during World War II, dropping from more than 9 million in 1940 to 7.7 million in 1951. It then resumed its long-term growth, rising to 10 million in 1999. After that the population began a steady decline, dropping to 9.7 million in 2006–2007. Originally a highly agrarian country with nearly 80% of its population in rural areas, Belarus has been undergoing a process of continuous urbanization. The share of its rural population decreased from 70% in 1959 to less than 30% in the 2000s.

 

 

 

Belarus demographics Population by Religion

Religion in Belarus (2015)

  Eastern Orthodoxy (73%)

  Catholicism (12%)

  Other Christians (9%)

  Others (3%)

  Not religious (3%)

 

 


 Belarus demographics Population by Immigrants

Net migration rate: 0.7 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2016 est.) This entry includes the figure for the difference between the number of persons entering and leaving a country during the year per 1,000 persons (based on midyear population). An excess of persons entering the country is referred to as net immigration (e.g., 3.56 migrants/1,000 population); an excess of persons leaving the country as net emigration (e.g., -9.26 migrants/1,000 population). The net migration rate indicates the contribution of migration to the overall level of population change. High levels of migration can cause problems such as increasing unemployment and potential ethnic strife (if people are coming in) or a reduction in the labor force, perhaps in certain key sectors (if people are leaving).


 Belarus demographics Population by Race
.

 Belarus demographics Population by Race

Belarusian

83.70%

Russian

8.30%

Polish

3.10%

Ukrainian

1.70%

other

2.40%

unspecified

0.90%

 

Belarus Population by City
.

S.No.

Name

Population

1

Minsk 

1,742,124

2

Gomel

480,951

3

Mogilev

369,200

4

Vitebsk

342,700

5

Hrodna, Grodnenskaya

317,365

6

Brest

300,715

7

Babruysk 

220,517

8

Baranovichi, Brest

168,772

9

Borisov, Minsk

143,919

10

Pinsk, Brest

130,777

 

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