Icelandic Parliamentary election 2017 Opinion poll Predictions Winning Candidate

Iceland Parliamentary election 2017 Results Voting Live Dates Opinion Exit Poll

Iceland Parliamentary election Dates 2017

Iceland Parliamentary election: 28 October 2017

Parliamentary elections are due to be held in Iceland on 28 October 2017. On 15 September 2017, the three-party coalition government collapsed after the departure of Bright Future over a scandal involving Prime Minister Bjarni Benediktsson's father writing a letter recommending a convicted paedophile have his "honour restored". Bjarni subsequently called for a snap election, which was officially scheduled for 28 October 2017 following the dissolution of the Althing.

 

 


Iceland Parliamentary election Opinion Poll 2017

 

Poll source

Fieldwork date Sample Ind. Left Green Social Dem
    size      
MMR 20–23 Oct 2017 979 22.9 19.9 13.5
MBL 16–19 Oct 2017 2395 25.1 23.2 15.6
Gallup 13–19 Oct 2017 2870 22.6 23.3 13.3
MMR 17–18 Oct 2017 1007 19.9 19.1 15.8

 

 

 

Iceland Parliamentary election Voting Live 2017

  1. Prime Minister Bjarni Benediktsson lost his nine-month-old, center-right coalition after one party quit over an attempt by the prime minister's father to help clear the name of a convicted pedophile.
  2. Iceland’s embattled prime minister, Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson, has become the first major casualty of the Panama Papers, stepping aside from his office amid mounting public outrage that his family had sheltered money offshore.
  3. President Gudni Th. Johannesson met Saturday with Benediktsson and was meeting with other party leaders later in the day.

     

     


    Electoral system of Iceland

Iceland elects on a national level a ceremonial head of state, the president – and a legislature. The president is elected for a four-year term by the people. The parliament (Alþingi) has 63 members, elected for a four-year term by proportional representation, using the D'Hondt method with open list.


Candidates for Iceland Parliamentary election 2017

The Pirate Party reject a traditional model of party leadership, but Birgitta Jónsdóttir co-founded the party and is often described as the party's informal leader. She announced that she would not be standing in the election. After Birgitta announced that she was not standing, Helgi Hrafn Gunnarsson announced that he would now be running to be an MP, having earlier quit due to what he described as bullying by Birgitta.
Former Progressive Party Prime Minister Sigmundur Davíð Gunnlaugsson announced in an open letter that he planned to create a party before the elections. The new Centre Party was founded 24 September


Iceland Parties and leaders

Bright Future (centre), list letter A
Centre Party (centre/centre-right), list letter M
Progressive Party (centre-right), list letter B
Reform (centre/centre-right), list letter C
Independence Party (centre-right/right-wing), list letter D
Social Democratic Alliance (centre-left), list letter S
Left-Green Movement (left-wing), list letter V
People's Party (left, populist), list letter F
Pirate Party (syncretic), list letter P
Parties with a list for only some constituencies
People's Front of Iceland (far-left), list letter R
Dawn, list letter T
The Icelandic National Front (right-wing/far-right) was going to take part in the election with list letter E, but has since withdrawn all its lists


Iceland past election results

 

Party

Votes

%

Seats

+/–

D

Independence Party

54,990

29.00

21

+2

V

Left-Green Movement

30,166

15.91

10

+3

P

Pirate Party

27,449

14.48

10

+7

B

Progressive Party

21,791

11.49

8

–11

C

Reform

19,870

10.48

7

New

A

Bright Future

13,578

7.16

4

–2

S

Social Democratic Alliance

10,893

5.74

3

–6

F

People's Party

6,707

3.54

0

New

T

Dawn

3,275

1.73

0

0

R

People's Front of Iceland

575

0.30

0

0

E

Icelandic National Front

303

0.16

0

New

H

Humanist Party

33

0.02

0

0

Invalid/blank votes

5,574

Total

195,204

100

63

0

Registered voters/turnout

246,511

79.19