Australian PM Malcolm Turnbull Opinion Poll NewsPolls 2016 Approval rating

Australian PM Malcolm Turnbull Opinion Poll NewsPolls 2016 Approval rating

Turnbull, came to power last September, voters are upset by lack of progress bringing "jobs and growth" as promised at July's election.

The Newspoll, ( News Corp publications) Opinion Poll (Sample Size: 1629 voters)
Coaliation: 48 % (PM Malcolm Turnbull's party)
Labor: 52%

Turnbull's personal approval rating as Prime Minister  


Latest : 41% (down 2 % from last poll, and 18% down this year)

However, Opposition Leader Bill Shorten failed to capitalize and his approval rating simultaneously fell a point in the polls.

According to the survey

  1. The prime minister will need to prioritize creating jobs and stimulating economic growth once Parliament resumes in the New Year.
  2. 36% of voters believe the economy should be Turnbull's top priority
  3. Fixing the budget is ranked as most important to 16% of voters.
  4. Prime minister's net satisfaction rating sits at -23 points, with satisfaction at 32 percent but dissatisfaction at 55 percent,
  5. Shorten's net satisfaction rating dropped two points to -17 points, six points better off than Turnbull.

Australia Latest Opinion Poll NewsPolls 2016, Brexit effect on Australia elections, Australia opinion poll, Malcolm Turnbull , Brexit

Australia Latest Opinion Poll NewsPolls 2016, Brexit effect on Australia elections, Australia opinion poll, Malcolm Turnbull , Brexit 

After the previous two Newspolls showed the coalition and the Labor opposition were neck-and-neck in the two-party preferred vote, the latest survey of almost 1,800 Australians showed the government's primary vote has risen to a 14-week high to propel it ahead in the two-party vote — 51 percent to 49 percent.

According to the Newspoll, the Brexit news affected the minor parties most of all, with support for the Greens dropping to 9 percent of the primary vote — its lowest level of support in almost three years — while independents also fell across the board.

Meanwhile Andrew Walter, Professor of International Relations at the University of Melbourne said the government would likely be the beneficiary of the Brexit vote, as "disenchanted" voters who planned on voting independent might now switch their vote back to a major party to ensure future stability.

According to the Newspoll, 65 percent of the respondents have "locked in" their vote, but 35 percent could be swayed in the lead-up to the vote on Saturday.

A new, Australian-Institute commissioned poll found that Australians were split as to which party would deliver more jobs and growth, a key slogan on the Turnbull campaign, with 33 percent trusting the government more, while 31 percent chose Labor, despite it not being that party's slogan.

Australians will head to the polls on July 2.

ReachTel poll: Turnbull’s popularity in his electorate of Wentworth has fallen, Malcolm Turnbull, Australia ReachTel opinion poll June, Wentworth ,Australia Prime minister election 2016

ReachTel poll: Turnbull’s popularity in his electorate of Wentworth has fallen, Malcolm Turnbull, Australia ReachTel opinion poll June, Wentworth ,Australia Prime minister election 2016

Malcolm Turnbull is facing a 10 per cent swing against him in his Sydney seat of Wentworth, according to polling that shows more than half his local electors think less of him since he became Prime Minister.

The ReachTel poll conducted across the blue-ribbon Liberal electorate last week suggests Mr Turnbull’s first preference vote will be slashed from 63 per cent to 53 per cent.

Only 14.5 per cent of people say their opinion of him has improved. About 30 per cent say their opinion is unchanged.

Almost 35 per cent of Liberal voters have cooled on him, while almost 80 per cent of Labor voters and close to 90 per cent of Greens voters say their opinion of him has diminished.

More than 53 per cent of respondents say Mr Turnbull has failed to live up to their expectations. Men and the over-50s are the most likely to be disappointed with his performance.

The polling comes a day after the latest Fairfax-Ipsos poll puts Labor ahead of the Coalition for the first time on 51-49. It also shows Mr Turnbull’s personal approval rating continuing to slide.
src:smh.com.au

Australian Federal election opinion poll ,Ipsos poll australia,labor,National party,Australian labor party

Australian Federal election opinion poll ,Ipsos poll australia,labor,National party,Australian labor party

  • A new Ipsos poll shows Labor leading the coalition government 51-49
  • But 55 percent of respondents expected the Coalition to retain government 
  • Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull remains preferred PM

src:wikipedia

Ipsos Opinion poll

TPP vote

L/NP

42%

49%

ALP

36%

51%

Green

13%

Other

9%

Australia latest opinion poll, Newspoll data, Turnbull Government, Labor , Labor coalition ,ausvotes2016,election2016,Bill Shorten,Malcolm Turnbull,seats in doubt,predict swing

Australia latest opinion poll, Newspoll data, Turnbull Government, Labor , Labor coalition ,ausvotes2016,election2016,Bill Shorten,Malcolm Turnbull,seats in doubt,predict swing

‘The Turnbull Government is facing the prospect of losing 10 seats in NSW, six in Queensland and three in Western Australia, with a significant slump in support in the key election battlegrounds.’ 

The Australian headlined a 6% swing against the government according to its own Newspoll data on 30 May.

I wrote this piece the day before [Sunday 29 May], without seeing the Newspoll data. Then in Monday’s Fairfax papers we also saw confirmation that the coalition is in trouble. James Massola wrote that the LNP is likely to lose at least a dozen seats and maybe even more.

‘Political strategists for both major parties believe the Coalition is on track to lose about 12 seats at the July 2 poll, slashing Malcolm Turnbull’s buffer in the Parliament but returning his government with a reduced second-term majority.’ 

A state by state breakdown

According to Roy Morgan (16 May figures), the Coalition currently only has a very slim two-party preferred lead in one state, but the numbers appear to be all over the place.

Tasmania

There are three crucial seats in Tasmania and the ALP needs to win at least two of them to have any chance of winning nationally.

For example, Labor thinks 11 seats in Queensland are in play, but to others the margins in some seem insurmountable. For example, it would take an almost unachievable 6.7% swing to unseat Immigration Minister (and part-time potato model) Peter Dutton in Dickson. But some plucky voters have a strategy to help make it happen on polling day.

The ALP holds a substantial lead on a 2PP basis, 57.5% to the coalition’s 42.5%.The figures in Victoria seem to mirror what’s happening in Tasmania. The ALP lead on 2PP is 56.5% versus the Coalition’s 43.5%

Victoria

The figures in Victoria seem to mirror what’s happening in Tasmania. The ALP lead on 2PP is 56.5% versus the Coalition’s 43.5%

Western Australia

In 2013 the statewide swing in WA to the coaliton was notionally only 1.7%. The Morgan poll in mid-May indicated a swing back to Labor of 8.8%. This would be more than enough to secure a Labor victory

Two weeks into the campaign and Morgan has the ALP in front with 54% over the Coalition on 46%.

Labor is hopeful of picking up two seats in the west, Hasluck and Burt.

South Australia

In mid-May, according to Morgan, the numbers stood at 53% for the ALP and 47% for the Coalition.

New South Wales

Morgan puts the ALP only just in front on 50.5% and the Coalition is close on 49.5% but the unpopularity of the Mike Baird LNP Government at the state level may help Labor federally. 

Queensland

The Sunshine State is the only place where the Coalition leads 51% to 49 for Labor. 

Labor holds the two ACT seats with a comfortable margin and will continue to do so.  Australian Capital Territory 

Northern Territory

There are only two seats for the whole of the Northern Territory, Solomon which is based on the city of Darwin and Lingari which takes in the rest of the territory. Labor is hopeful of picking up Solomon, which it can do with a swing of just under 2%.  

src: independentaustralia.net  

Australian PM’s popularity has fallen ahead of elections: Ipsos Opinion poll, Australian Prime Minister Election 2016, Malcolm Turnbull, Australian federal election 2016, Two-party-preferred vote opinion poll, Bill Shorten

Australian PM’s popularity has fallen ahead of elections: Reuters, Ipsos Opinion poll, Australian Prime Minister Election 2016, Malcolm Turnbull, Australian federal election 2016, Two-party-preferred vote opinion poll, Bill Shorten

MELBOURNE Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s popularity has fallen, just over a month before what is expected to a closely fought election, a an opinion poll published on Saturday showed.

IPSOS Poll Coalition/Liberal Labor
 Vote Percentage  51 %  49%
     

However, Turnbull’s personal popularity as preferred prime minister fell four percentage points to 47 per cent, which is still above opposition leader Bill Shorten at 30 per cent.

Australians will vote on July 2 after an unusually long 74-day campaign.

Turnbull, considered a moderate in the conservative Liberal Party-led coalition government, had enjoyed high levels of popularity since he deposed his right-wing predecessor, Tony Abbott, in an internal party coup in September.

Economic issues such as tax and the funding of education and health care have been front and centre in the campaign, as well as the hot-button issue of asylum seekers and border protection.

What is Double dissolution in Australia?, Australia Prime Minister Election 2016, Malcolm Turnbull, Australia PM Elections News Updates Opinion Poll

What is Double dissolution in Australia?, Australia Prime Minister Election 2016, Malcolm Turnbull, Australia PM Elections News Updates Opinion Pol

Australian Prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, asked for a Double Dissolution here on Sunday, May 9, after meeting the Governor General (equivalent to president in India) Sir Peter Cosgrove. This calls for an early election on July 2, 2016 way early of the scheduled elections later this year. This will be the first Double Dissolution election in almost 30 years, last being in 1987. The early date of election leaves the coalition with the 55-day marathon election campaigning for the Prime Ministerial berth

What is Double Dissolution?

Section 57 of the Commonwealth Constitution provides the conditions (called Trigger) for Double Dissolution. Whenever there is a disagreement between the two houses of Australian legislature – House of Representative and Senate – over a proposed bill, the prime minister can recommend for Double Dissolution to the Governor General. The Governor General, as a convention, declares Double Dissolution only on the advice of the prime minister and calls for re-election. After the re-election, if the disagreement over the bill still continues between the two houses, then a joint sitting of the two houses can be called to vote on the bill.

What happened?

Coalition’s (Turnbull’s Government) budget released last week was met with fierce opposition from the opposition Labor party in the Australian parliament. The budget provided for a reduction in corporate tax as well as huge tax breaks to the country’s largest companies. Bill Shorten, opposition leader, called Turnbull’s policies as that “reward millionaires” while threatening all Australian’s living standard.

But the focal point of contention between the two parties was the revival of Australian Building and Construction commission (ABCC), a watchdog over the construction sector. A more union-friendly Labor government had already revamped the ABCC into Fair Work Building and Construction in 2012, cutting back some aspects of its power.

Way ahead

Prime Minister Turnbull in his media briefing, soon after the declaration of Double Dissolution, appealed to the voters to support an economic plan that promises economic growth for all.

For now the election would be between a conservative Liberal-National coalition that offers revived Australian economy and a centre-left Labor that promises redistribution of economic wealth.

Popular opinion polls conducted by various agencies predict a close fight between the two. Seven-ReachTEL predicted a neck-to-neck fight with both the parties getting 50% support based on two party preferred basis while Galaxy Research predicted 49% and 51% for Coalition and Labor respectively.

The main issues, however, for this year’s election would be a flagging Australian economy and the hot-button issues like policy on asylum seekers.