United Kingdom general Election results 2019 live by Party Candidates

United Kingdom general Election results 2019 live by Party Candidates

The United Kingdom general Election results 2019 live is scheduled to be held on Thursday 12 December 2019. It is to be held under the provisions of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019, two and a half years after the previous general election in June 2017.

The 2019 election is due to be the first UK general election to be held in December since 1923, and was arranged at short notice in late October. Each parliamentary constituency of the United Kingdom elects one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons using the first-past-the-post voting system. This indirectly elects the government, which is formed by a party or coalition of parties that can command the confidence of a majority of MPs in the Commons. Both majority and minority governments are possible election outcomes.


 

United Kingdom general Election Results

Party and leader Leader Seats Share Count
Conservative Party

Boris Johnson
365 43.60% 1,39,66,565
Labour Party

Jeremy Corbyn
203 32.20% 1,02,95,607
Scottish National Party

Nicola Sturgeon
48 3.90% 1242372
Liberal Democrats

Jo Swinson
11 11.60% 3696423
Democratic Unionist Party

Arlene Foster
8 0.80% 244128
Sinn Féin

Mary Lou McDonald
7 0.60% 181853
Plaid Cymru

Adam Price
4 0.50% 153265
Green Party

Jonathan Bartley & Siân Berry Am
1 2.70% 865697
Brexit Party

Nigel Farage
     
UK Independence Party

Patricia Mountain
     
Other parties

  3 2.00% 700886

Dates United Kingdom general Election 2019 

 

Further information: Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019

The deadline for delivery of candidates' nomination papers was 14 November. The election is scheduled for 12 December 2019, with polling stations opening at 7am and closing at 10pm.

This date occurred despite the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 (FTPA), which introduced fixed-term parliaments to the United Kingdom, with elections scheduled on the first Thursday in May of the fifth year after the previous general election. This would have led to an election on 5 May 2022.On 29 October 2019, the House of Commons passed the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 which circumvented the FTPA so as to hold a December election. The House of Lords followed suit the following day, with Royal Assent the day afterward.

Due to the impasse about the Brexit withdrawal agreement, some political commentators in 2019 considered an early election to be highly likely. In January 2019 a vote of no confidence in Theresa May's government was called by the Labour Party. If passed, and no alternative government could be formed, this would have resulted in a general election, but this motion failed. After becoming Prime Minister in the summer, Boris Johnson made three attempts at a vote for an early general election under the terms of the FTPA, but each failed to achieve the required two-thirds supermajority.The eventually successful bill, which required only a simple majority to pass (though it could be amended during its passage through Parliament), was proposed by the Liberal Democrat and Scottish National parties on 28 October and adopted by the government the following day (albeit with a Thursday 12 December date rather than Monday 9 December proposed by the opposition parties). An amendment changing the date to 9 December failed by 315 votes to 295.The final Commons vote on the bill passed by 438 votes to 20.

The election would be the first UK general election in December since 1923, and the first general election to be held by virtue of an Act of Parliament.

Tuesday 29 October

Passage of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 through the House of Commons

Wednesday 30 October

Passage of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 through the House of Lords

Thursday 31 October

Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 receives Royal Assent and comes into force immediately. The Act sets 12 December as the date for the next parliamentary general election.

Wednesday 6 November

Dissolution of Parliament (the 57th) and official start of the campaign. Beginning of purdah. Royal Proclamation summoning a new Parliament and setting the date for its first meeting issued.

Thursday 7 November

Receipt of writ – legal documents declaring election issued

From Friday 8 November

Notice of election given in constituencies

Thursday 14 November

Nominations of candidates close

Saturday 16 November

Candidates lists are published for each constituency

Thursday 21 November

Deadline to register for a postal vote at 5pm (Northern Ireland)[33]

Tuesday 26 November

Deadline to register for a postal vote at 5pm (Great Britain)[33]

Deadline for registering to vote at 11:59pm[33]

Wednesday 4 December

Deadline to register for a proxy vote at 5pm. (Exemptions apply for emergencies.)

Thursday 12 December

Polling Day – polls open 7am to 10pm

Friday 13 December

Results to be announced for the majority of the 650 constituencies. End of purdah.

Tuesday 17 December

First meeting of the new (58th) Parliament of the United Kingdom, for the formal election of a Speaker of the Commons and the swearing-in of members, ahead of the State Opening of the new Parliament's first session.


The Electoral system of United Kingdom​ 

Each parliamentary constituency of the United Kingdom elects one MP to the House of Commons using the "first past the post" system. If one party obtains a majority of seats, then that party is entitled to form the Government, with its leader as Prime Minister. If the election results in no single party having a majority, there is a hung parliament. In this case, the options for forming the Government are either a minority government or a coalition.


United Kingdom​ party and Leaders  

Leader

Party

Theresa May

Conservative

Jeremy Corbyn

Labour

Nicola Sturgeon

SNP

Tim Farron

Liberal Democrats

Arlene Foster

DUP

Gerry Adams

Sinn Féin


United Kingdom​ Past Elections Results 

Great Britain

Major parties (parties with multiple MPs at dissolution or those that currently have multiple MEPs) that are contesting this election in Great Britain are shown in the table below with their results at the 2017 general election, ordered by the number of seats they won.

Party

Party leader(s)

Last election

Seats at

% of

Seats

dissolution

votes

 

Conservative Party

Boris Johnson

42.40%

317

298

Labour Party

Jeremy Corbyn

40.00%

262

244

Scottish National Party

Nicola Sturgeon

3.00%

35

35

Liberal Democrats

Jo Swinson

7.40%

12

21

Change UK

Anna Soubry

New party

5

Plaid Cymru

Adam Price

0.50%

4

4

Green Party of England and Wales

Jonathan Bartley

1.60%

1

1

Siân Berry

Brexit Party

Nigel Farage

New party

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Ireland

While a number of UK parties organise in Northern Ireland (including the Labour Party, which does not field candidates) and others field candidates for election (most notably the Conservatives), the main Northern Ireland parties are different from those in the rest of the UK.

Some parties in Northern Ireland operate on an all-Ireland basis, including Sinn Féin and Aontú, who are abstensionist parties and do not take up any Commons seats to which they are elected. The only independent elected to Parliament in 2017, Sylvia Hermon, represented North Down but is not standing in 2019.

For the 2019 election, there are a total of 102 candidates in Northern Ireland.

Party

Leader

Last election

Seats at

Contesting seats

 

dissolution

 

(out of

18 in total)

 

 

%

(in NI)

Seats

 

Democratic Unionist Party

Arlene Foster

36.00%

10

10

17 seats

 

Sinn Féin

Mary Lou McDonald

29.40%

7

7

15 seats

 

Social Democratic & Labour Party

Colum Eastwood

11.70%

0

0

15 seats

 

Ulster Unionist Party

Steve Aiken

10.30%

0

0

16 seats

 

Alliance Party

Naomi Long

7.90%

0

0

18 seats

 

Aontú

Peadar Tóibín

New party

0

7 seats

 

NI Conservatives

Neil Johnston

0.70%

0

0

4 seats

 

(Leader in NI)

 

Green Party of Northern Ireland

Clare Bailey

0.90%

0

0

3 seats

 

People Before Profit

None[n 15]

0.40%

0

0

2 seats

 

United Kingdom general Election live voting 2019

United Kingdom general Election live voting 2019

The 2019 United Kingdom general election is scheduled to be held on Thursday 12 December 2019. It is to be held under the provisions of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019, two and a half years after the previous general election in June 2017.

The 2019 election is due to be the first UK general election to be held in December since 1923, and was arranged at short notice in late October. Each parliamentary constituency of the United Kingdom elects one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons using the first-past-the-post voting system. This indirectly elects the government, which is formed by a party or coalition of parties that can command the confidence of a majority of MPs in the Commons. Both majority and minority governments are possible election outcomes.


 

United Kingdom general Election Live Voting 

2019 UK general election results

326 needed for majority

Official · 633/650 seats

Party and leader

Seats

Share

Count

Conservative Party

Boris Johnson

353

43.50%

1,35,29,614

Labour Party

Jeremy Corbyn

202

32.50%

1,01,15,117

Scottish National Party

Nicola Sturgeon

46

3.80%

11,94,195

Liberal Democrats

Jo Swinson

10

11.40%

35,28,143

Democratic Unionist Party

Arlene Foster

8

0.80%

2,44,128

Sinn Féin

Mary Lou McDonald

6

0.50%

1,59,867

Plaid Cymru

Adam Price

4

0.50%

1,53,265

Green Party

Jonathan Bartley & Siân Berry Am

1

2.70%

8,42,215

Brexit Party

Nigel Farage

0

2.10%

6,38,568

UK Independence Party

Patricia Mountain

0

0.10%

22,145

Other parties

3

2.10%

6,63,392

Source: PA Media via dpa-infocom. 

Dates United Kingdom general Election 2019 
 

Further information: Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019

The deadline for delivery of candidates' nomination papers was 14 November. The election is scheduled for 12 December 2019, with polling stations opening at 7am and closing at 10pm.

This date occurred despite the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 (FTPA), which introduced fixed-term parliaments to the United Kingdom, with elections scheduled on the first Thursday in May of the fifth year after the previous general election. This would have led to an election on 5 May 2022.On 29 October 2019, the House of Commons passed the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 which circumvented the FTPA so as to hold a December election. The House of Lords followed suit the following day, with Royal Assent the day afterward.

Due to the impasse about the Brexit withdrawal agreement, some political commentators in 2019 considered an early election to be highly likely. In January 2019 a vote of no confidence in Theresa May's government was called by the Labour Party. If passed, and no alternative government could be formed, this would have resulted in a general election, but this motion failed. After becoming Prime Minister in the summer, Boris Johnson made three attempts at a vote for an early general election under the terms of the FTPA, but each failed to achieve the required two-thirds supermajority.The eventually successful bill, which required only a simple majority to pass (though it could be amended during its passage through Parliament), was proposed by the Liberal Democrat and Scottish National parties on 28 October and adopted by the government the following day (albeit with a Thursday 12 December date rather than Monday 9 December proposed by the opposition parties). An amendment changing the date to 9 December failed by 315 votes to 295.The final Commons vote on the bill passed by 438 votes to 20.

The election would be the first UK general election in December since 1923, and the first general election to be held by virtue of an Act of Parliament.

Tuesday 29 October

Passage of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 through the House of Commons

Wednesday 30 October

Passage of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 through the House of Lords

Thursday 31 October

Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 receives Royal Assent and comes into force immediately. The Act sets 12 December as the date for the next parliamentary general election.

Wednesday 6 November

Dissolution of Parliament (the 57th) and official start of the campaign. Beginning of purdah. Royal Proclamation summoning a new Parliament and setting the date for its first meeting issued.

Thursday 7 November

Receipt of writ – legal documents declaring election issued

From Friday 8 November

Notice of election given in constituencies

Thursday 14 November

Nominations of candidates close

Saturday 16 November

Candidates lists are published for each constituency

Thursday 21 November

Deadline to register for a postal vote at 5pm (Northern Ireland)[33]

Tuesday 26 November

Deadline to register for a postal vote at 5pm (Great Britain)[33]

Deadline for registering to vote at 11:59pm[33]

Wednesday 4 December

Deadline to register for a proxy vote at 5pm. (Exemptions apply for emergencies.)

Thursday 12 December

Polling Day – polls open 7am to 10pm

Friday 13 December

Results to be announced for the majority of the 650 constituencies. End of purdah.

Tuesday 17 December

First meeting of the new (58th) Parliament of the United Kingdom, for the formal election of a Speaker of the Commons and the swearing-in of members, ahead of the State Opening of the new Parliament's first session.


The Electoral system of United Kingdom​ 

Each parliamentary constituency of the United Kingdom elects one MP to the House of Commons using the "first past the post" system. If one party obtains a majority of seats, then that party is entitled to form the Government, with its leader as Prime Minister. If the election results in no single party having a majority, there is a hung parliament. In this case, the options for forming the Government are either a minority government or a coalition.


United Kingdom​ party and Leaders  

Leader

Party

Theresa May

Conservative

Jeremy Corbyn

Labour

Nicola Sturgeon

SNP

Tim Farron

Liberal Democrats

Arlene Foster

DUP

Gerry Adams

Sinn Féin


United Kingdom​ Past Elections Results 

Great Britain

Major parties (parties with multiple MPs at dissolution or those that currently have multiple MEPs) that are contesting this election in Great Britain are shown in the table below with their results at the 2017 general election, ordered by the number of seats they won.

Party

Party leader(s)

Last election

Seats at

% of

Seats

dissolution

votes

 

Conservative Party

Boris Johnson

42.40%

317

298

Labour Party

Jeremy Corbyn

40.00%

262

244

Scottish National Party

Nicola Sturgeon

3.00%

35

35

Liberal Democrats

Jo Swinson

7.40%

12

21

Change UK

Anna Soubry

New party

5

Plaid Cymru

Adam Price

0.50%

4

4

Green Party of England and Wales

Jonathan Bartley

1.60%

1

1

Siân Berry

Brexit Party

Nigel Farage

New party

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Ireland

While a number of UK parties organise in Northern Ireland (including the Labour Party, which does not field candidates) and others field candidates for election (most notably the Conservatives), the main Northern Ireland parties are different from those in the rest of the UK.

Some parties in Northern Ireland operate on an all-Ireland basis, including Sinn Féin and Aontú, who are abstensionist parties and do not take up any Commons seats to which they are elected. The only independent elected to Parliament in 2017, Sylvia Hermon, represented North Down but is not standing in 2019.

For the 2019 election, there are a total of 102 candidates in Northern Ireland.

Party

Leader

Last election

Seats at

Contesting seats

 

dissolution

 

(out of

18 in total)

 

 

%

(in NI)

Seats

 

Democratic Unionist Party

Arlene Foster

36.00%

10

10

17 seats

 

Sinn Féin

Mary Lou McDonald

29.40%

7

7

15 seats

 

Social Democratic & Labour Party

Colum Eastwood

11.70%

0

0

15 seats

 

Ulster Unionist Party

Steve Aiken

10.30%

0

0

16 seats

 

Alliance Party

Naomi Long

7.90%

0

0

18 seats

 

Aontú

Peadar Tóibín

New party

0

7 seats

 

NI Conservatives

Neil Johnston

0.70%

0

0

4 seats

 

(Leader in NI)

 

Green Party of Northern Ireland

Clare Bailey

0.90%

0

0

3 seats

 

People Before Profit

None[n 15]

0.40%

0

0

2 seats