Peruvian parliamentary election dates and Voting Live 2020 

 Peruvian parliamentary election dates and Voting Live 2020 

 Peruvian parliamentary election Dates 2020

 Peruvian parliamentary election​ Date: 26 January 2020​ 

Early parliamentary elections are scheduled to be held in Peru on 26 January 2020. The elections were called after President Martín Vizcarra dissolved the Congress of the Republic on 30 September 2019.

 


 Peruvian parliamentary election dates and Voting Live 2020 

  • The battle between Vizcarra’s cabinet and opposition-dominated Congress explained
  • A look at the context and mechanisms within Peru's constitution
  • Nearly 90 percent of Peruvians want members of Congress to step down.

 

The Electoral system of Peruvian  

The 130 members of Congress are elected in 25 multi-member constituencies using open list proportional representation.

 


Peruvian parliamentary election Party and candidate 

Name of Candidate

Name of Party

George Forsyth

We Are Peru

Kenji Fujimori

Popular Force

Keiko Fujimori

Popular Force

Julio Guzmán

Purple Party

Verónika Mendoza

New Peru

Salvador del Solar

Peruvians for Change


Peruvian Elections Results

#To Be Announced

 


 Past Peruvian Elections Results 

Party

Vote

%

Seats

Popular Force

4,431,077

36.34

73

Peruvians for Change

2,007,710

16.47

18

Broad Front

1,700,052

13.94

20

Alliance for the Progress of Peru

1,125,682

9.23

9

Popular Alliance

1,013,735

8.31

5

Popular Action

877,734

7.2

5

Direct Democracy

528,301

4.33

0

Possible Peru

286,980

2.35

0

Hope Front

139,634

1.15

0

Order Party

68,474

0.56

0

Developing Peru

14,663

0.12

0

Invalid/blank votes

 

Total

12,194,042

100

130

Registered voters/turnout

22,901,954

 

Seventh Democratic debate Des Moines Iowa 2020 Date Results Candidates

Seventh Democratic debate Des Moines Iowa 2020 Date Results Candidates

 

US Map Eelctions

The 2020 United States presidential election, scheduled for Tuesday, November 3, 2020, will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. Voters will select presidential electors who in turn on December 14, 2020, will either elect a new president and vice president or re-elect the incumbents. In the event that no candidate receives the minimum 270 electoral votes needed to win the election, the United States House of Representatives will select the president from three candidates that received the most electoral votes, and the United States Senate will select the vice president from the candidates that received the two highest totals. The series of presidential primary elections and caucuses are likely to be held during the first six months of 2020. This nominating process is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots selecting a slate of delegates to a political party's nominating convention, who then in turn elect their party's presidential nominee.


US Elections Democratic and Republican Debates Dates 2020

 

  1. Also Read: US County Result 
  2. Also Read: US Election Result
  3. US United States Population Demographics Religion Percentage 2017 By City Immigrants
  4. USA United States Muslim Population Percentage By City Demographics Religion

2020
January
 


January 14: The seventh Democratic debate will take place in Des Moines, Iowa at Drake University.

The debate, scheduled for Jan. 14, will be hosted by CNN in
 It is slated to occur just weeks before Iowa's Feb. 3 caucuses.
To qualify for the January, candidates must have:
•Received 5% or more support in at least four different polls, which may be national polls or state polls in the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina or Nevada. That’s up from 4% for the December debate, held Thursday night. To
•Received donations from at least 225,000 total donors and at least 1,000 donors in at least 20 states. That’s up from 200,000 total donors and 800 donors in 20 states for the December debate.

United States Presidential Election 2020 Details


US Elections Democratic and Republican Primary and caucuses Dates 2020

 

The following primary and caucus dates have been scheduled by state statutes or state party decisions, but are subject to change pending legislation, state party delegate selection plans, or the decisions of state secretaries of state:
February 3: Iowa caucuses
February 11: New Hampshire primary
February 22: Nevada caucuses
February 29: South Carolina primary

March 3: Super Tuesday (Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Virginia primaries); American Samoa caucuses; Democrats Abroad party-run primary for expatriates features a March 3–10 voting period.
March 10: Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, and Washington primaries; North Dakota firehouse caucuses (identical to a party-run primary).
March 14: Northern Mariana Islands caucuses
March 17: Arizona, Florida, Illinois, and Ohio primaries
March 24: Georgia primary
 


March 29: Puerto Rico primary
April 4: Alaska, Hawaii, and Louisiana primaries; Wyoming caucuses
April 7: Wisconsin primary
April 28: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island primaries
May 2: Kansas primary; Guam caucuses
May 5: Indiana primary
May 12: Nebraska and West Virginia primaries
May 19: Kentucky and Oregon primaries
June 2: Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota primaries
June 6: United States Virgin Islands caucuses
June 16: District of Columbia primary (bill proposing a move to June 2 has been approved by the DC Council and now only awaits final approval by the U.S. Congress for enactment)
The 57 states, districts, territories, or other constituencies with elections of pledged delegates to decide the Democratic presidential nominee, currently plan to hold the first major determining step for these elections via 50 primaries[o] and seven caucuses (Iowa, Nevada, Wyoming, and four territories). The number of states holding caucuses decreased from 14 in the 2016 nomination process to only three in 2020

 

Source: wikipedia.org

Croatian presidential Election Results 2020 Live Second Round

Croatian presidential Election Results 2020 Live Second Round

Second Round Croatian presidential Election Dates 2020

Second Round Croatian presidential Election Date: 5 January 2020 

Presidential elections will be held in Croatia on 22 December 2019. If no candidate receives a majority of all votes cast (including blank and invalid ballots), a second round will take place on 5 January 2020 between the two candidates with the highest number of votes in the first round. They will be the seventh presidential elections since the first direct ones were held in 1992.

The decision to call the election was made by the Croatian Government during its session on 14 November 2019. Potential candidates were required to gather at least 10,000 signatures from Croatian citizens who have reached the age of 18 in order for their candidacy to become official and for their name to appear on the ballot. They were allocated a time frame of 12 days to accomplish this and thus had until midnight local time on 3 December 2019 to present their signatures to the State Electoral Commission. A total of twelve candidates submitted signatures by the deadline and the commission then proceeded to verify the signatures within the following 48 hours, presenting a final list of eleven approved candidates on 5 December 2019.


Croatian presidential Election Results 2020 Live Second Round

Candidate

Party First round Second round
    Votes % Votes %
Zoran Milanović Social Democratic Party 562783 29.55 1034389 52.67
Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović Independent 507628 26.65 929488 47.33

First round Croatian presidential Election Voting Live 2019 

In the first round of the election, which was held on 22 December 2019, former Prime Minister Zoran Milanović finished in first place with a relative majority of 29.55% of all votes cast. He was followed closely by incumbent president Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, who received 26.65% of the vote, and by Miroslav Škoro, who acquired 24.45% of the vote. Thus, as no candidate managed to reach the required percentage of the vote to win outright in the first round, a run-off election is due to take place on 5 January 2020 between the two candidates with the most votes in the first round: Zoran Milanović and Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović. The term of the newly-elected president is currently due to begin on 19 February 2020.


Second Round Croatian Parties and Leaders

   


                              22 December 2019 (first round)
5 January 2020 (second round)
                             
  Z milanovic.jpg Kolinda Grabar-Kitarovićile (34771463620).jpg
Nominee Zoran Milanović Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović  
Party SDP Independent(HDZ)
Alliance AK-MDS-NK-NS-R-SNAGA-SU-ZS BM 365-HDS-HSP AS

First Round Croatian Parties and Leaders

Leader

Party

Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović

Independent

Zoran Milanović

SDP

Miroslav Škoro

Independent

Mislav Kolakušić

Independent

Dalija Orešković

Independent

Ivan Pernar

SIP


Croatian presidential Election results 

Candidate

Party

First round

Second round

Votes

%

Votes

%

Zoran Milanović

Social Democratic Party

562,783

29.55

 

 

Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović

Independent (HDZ)

507,628

26.65

 

 

Miroslav Škoro

Independent

465,704

24.45

 

Mislav Kolakušić

Independent

111,916

5.88

Dario Juričan

Independent

87,883

4.61

Dalija Orešković

Independent

55,163

2.9

Ivan Pernar

Party of Ivan Pernar

44,057

2.31

Katarina Peović

Workers' Front

21,387

1.12

Dejan Kovač

Croatian Social Liberal Party

18,107

0.95

Anto Đapić

DESNO

4,001

0.21

Nedjeljko Babić

HSSČKŠ

3,014

0.16

Invalid/blank votes

22,218

1.17

 

 

Presents without voting

600

0.03

 

 

Total

1,904,461

100

 

 

Registered voters/Turnout

3,719,741

51.18

 

 

Second Round Croatian presidential Election Live Voting 2020

Second Round Croatian presidential Election Live Voting 2020

Second Round Croatian presidential Election Dates 2020

Second Round Croatian presidential Election Date: 5 January 2020 

Presidential elections will be held in Croatia on 22 December 2019. If no candidate receives a majority of all votes cast (including blank and invalid ballots), a second round will take place on 5 January 2020 between the two candidates with the highest number of votes in the first round. They will be the seventh presidential elections since the first direct ones were held in 1992.

The decision to call the election was made by the Croatian Government during its session on 14 November 2019. Potential candidates were required to gather at least 10,000 signatures from Croatian citizens who have reached the age of 18 in order for their candidacy to become official and for their name to appear on the ballot. They were allocated a time frame of 12 days to accomplish this and thus had until midnight local time on 3 December 2019 to present their signatures to the State Electoral Commission. A total of twelve candidates submitted signatures by the deadline and the commission then proceeded to verify the signatures within the following 48 hours, presenting a final list of eleven approved candidates on 5 December 2019.


First round Croatian presidential Election Voting Live 2019 

In the first round of the election, which was held on 22 December 2019, former Prime Minister Zoran Milanović finished in first place with a relative majority of 29.55% of all votes cast. He was followed closely by incumbent president Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović, who received 26.65% of the vote, and by Miroslav Škoro, who acquired 24.45% of the vote. Thus, as no candidate managed to reach the required percentage of the vote to win outright in the first round, a run-off election is due to take place on 5 January 2020 between the two candidates with the most votes in the first round: Zoran Milanović and Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović. The term of the newly-elected president is currently due to begin on 19 February 2020.


Second Round Croatian Parties and Leaders

   


                              22 December 2019 (first round)
5 January 2020 (second round)
                             
  Z milanovic.jpg Kolinda Grabar-Kitarovićile (34771463620).jpg
Nominee Zoran Milanović Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović  
Party SDP Independent(HDZ)
Alliance AK-MDS-NK-NS-R-SNAGA-SU-ZS BM 365-HDS-HSP AS

First Round Croatian Parties and Leaders

Leader

Party

Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović

Independent

Zoran Milanović

SDP

Miroslav Škoro

Independent

Mislav Kolakušić

Independent

Dalija Orešković

Independent

Ivan Pernar

SIP


Croatian presidential Election results 

Candidate

Party

First round

Second round

Votes

%

Votes

%

Zoran Milanović

Social Democratic Party

562,783

29.55

 

 

Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović

Independent (HDZ)

507,628

26.65

 

 

Miroslav Škoro

Independent

465,704

24.45

 

Mislav Kolakušić

Independent

111,916

5.88

Dario Juričan

Independent

87,883

4.61

Dalija Orešković

Independent

55,163

2.9

Ivan Pernar

Party of Ivan Pernar

44,057

2.31

Katarina Peović

Workers' Front

21,387

1.12

Dejan Kovač

Croatian Social Liberal Party

18,107

0.95

Anto Đapić

DESNO

4,001

0.21

Nedjeljko Babić

HSSČKŠ

3,014

0.16

Invalid/blank votes

22,218

1.17

 

 

Presents without voting

600

0.03

 

 

Total

1,904,461

100

 

 

Registered voters/Turnout

3,719,741

51.18

 

 

California US Demographics Population Religion Percentage by City Immigrants

Alabama US Demographics Population Religion Percentage by City Immigrants

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Alabama's 2000 population was 4,447,100. As of the 2010 census, Alabama has a population of 4,802,740, which is an increase of 23,004, or 0.48%, from the prior year and an increase of 332,636 or 7.5%, since the year 2000. This includes a natural increase since the last census of 87,818 people (that is 375,808 births minus 287,990 deaths) and an increase due to net migration of 73,178 people into the state. Immigration from outside the United States resulted in a net increase of 30,537 people, and migration within the country produced a net increase of 42,641 people.
As of 2004 Alabama had 108,000 foreign-born (2.4% of the state population), of which an estimated 22.2% were undocumented immigrants (24,000). In 2006, Alabama had a larger percentage of tobacco smokers than the national average, with 23% of adults smoking.

Alabama Population by Religion Followed

  1. Christian – 84%
  2. Protestant – 61%
  3. Baptist – 37%
  4. Jewish – 1%
  5. Other religions – 3%
  6. No religion – 6%
  7. Refused – 6%

  Alabama US demographics Population by Race
.

Historically, African Americans were brought to Alabama as slaves, in greatest numbers in the cotton-producing plantation region known as the Black Belt. This region remains predominantly African American, where many freedmen settled to work at agriculture after the Civil War. The northern part of the state, originally settled by small farmers with fewer slaves, is predominantly European American. The Port of Mobile, founded by the French and subsequently controlled by England, Spain, and the United States, has long had an ethnically diverse population. It has long served as an entry point for various groups settling in other parts of the state. Those citing "American" ancestry in Alabama are of overwhelmingly English extraction, however most English Americans identify simply as having American ancestry because their roots have been in North America for so long, in many cases since the early sixteen hundreds. Demographers estimate that a minimum of 20–23% of people in Alabama are of predominantly English ancestry and state that the figure is probably much higher. In the 1980 census 1,139,976 people in Alabama cited that they were of English ancestry out of a total state population of 2,824,719 making them 41% of the state at the time and the largest ethnic group. There are also many more people in Alabama of Scots-Irish origins than are self-reported. Many people in Alabama claim Irish ancestry because of the term "Scots-Irish", but most of the time in Alabama this term is used for those with Scottish roots, rather than Irish.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Demographics of Alabama

 

 

 

 

 

 

       
By race White Black AIAN* Asian NHPI*
2000 (total population) 72.56% 26.33% 1.00% 0.89% 0.07%
2000 (Hispanic only) 1.48% 0.18% 0.04% 0.02% 0.01%
2005 (total population) 72.14% 26.70% 0.98% 1.02% 0.07%
2005 (Hispanic only) 2.08% 0.17% 0.05% 0.03% 0.01%
Growth 2000–05 (total population) 1.90% 3.95% -0.06% 17.43% 4.90%
Growth 2000–05 (non-Hispanic only) 1.02% 3.97% -0.55% 17.47% 6.67%
Growth 2000–05 (Hispanic only) 43.85% 1.05% 11.46% 16.20% -2.17%

Live Births by Race/Ethnicity of Mother

 

 

 

 

Live Births by Race/Ethnicity of Mother

 

 

 

 

 
Race 2013 2014 2015
White: 38,971 (67.0%) 39,578 (66.6%) 39,845 (66.8%)
Non-Hispanic White 35,086 (60.3%) 35,929 (60.5%) 35,826 (60.1%)
Black 18,014 (31.0%) 18,417 (31.0%) 18,429 (30.9%)
Asian 973 (1.7%) 1,227 (2.1%) 1,193 (2.0%)
Native 209 (0.3%) 200 (0.3%) 190 (0.3%)
Hispanic (of any race) 4,002 (6.9%) 4,019 (6.8%) 4,295 (7.2%)
Total Alabama 58,167 (100%) 59,422 (100%) 59,657 (100%)

Alabama Historical Population Figure Till Date

Year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pop. ±%
1800 1250 —    
1810 9046 623.70%
1820 127901 1313.90%
1830 309527 142.00%
1840 590756 90.90%
1850 771623 30.60%
1860 964201 25.00%
1870 996992 3.40%
1880 1262505 26.60%
1890 1513401 19.90%
1900 1828697 20.80%
1910 2138093 16.90%
1920 2348174 9.80%
1930 2646248 12.70%
1940 2832961 7.10%
1950 3061743 8.10%
1960 3266740 6.70%
1970 3444165 5.40%
1980 3893888 13.10%
1990 4040587 3.80%
2000 4447100 10.10%
2010 4779736 7.50%
2016 4863300 1.70%

  Alabama US demographics Population by Immigrants

 


 Alabama US Population by City
.

US Map Eelctions 

United States Primary Candidate Filling deadline Dates 2020

United States Primary Candidate Filling deadline Dates 2020

 

US Map Eelctions

The 2020 United States presidential election, scheduled for Tuesday, November 3, 2020, will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. Voters will select presidential electors who in turn on December 14, 2020, will either elect a new president and vice president or re-elect the incumbents. In the event that no candidate receives the minimum 270 electoral votes needed to win the election, the United States House of Representatives will select the president from three candidates that received the most electoral votes, and the United States Senate will select the vice president from the candidates that received the two highest totals. The series of presidential primary elections and caucuses are likely to be held during the first six months of 2020. This nominating process is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots selecting a slate of delegates to a political party's nominating convention, who then in turn elect their party's presidential nominee.


US Primary Candidate Filling Deadlines

  1. Also Read: US County Result 
  2. Also Read: US Election Result
  3. US United States Population Demographics Religion Percentage 2017 By City Immigrants
  4. USA United States Muslim Population Percentage By City Demographics Religion

Primary candidate filing deadlines
Starting in September 2019, several states began accepting petitions and other materials from the presidential campaigns to facilitate getting their person on the ballot during the primary. Such filings are generally not required in states that instead have caucuses conducted directly by the political parties.
Requirements for filing vary by state. Some state may require candidates to submit petitions with thousands of signatures from supporters within the state. In other states, their secretaries of state or elections officials determine an approved list of "generally advocated or recognized candidates in national news media"; those not put on these lists must then submit signature petitions to get on the primary ballot.
In some states like Florida,Georgia,Kansas,Massachusetts,Minnesota,South Carolina,and Washington,primary candidates instead file directly with their state political party, who then in turn submit their list of candidates to their state's Secretary of state/elections department.
The following is a list of deadlines for those states where the candidates must file directly with their secretary of state or state elections department:
Petition for those candidates not determined by the state as a "generally advocated or recognized candidate by the national news media"
2019
December 24: Missouri
2020
January 3: Illinois
January 15: Mississippi
January 24: Maryland
January 25: West Virginia
January 28: Indiana,Kentucky,Wisconsin
February 28 Delaware
March 4: District of Columbia
March 6: Connecticut
March 9: Montana
March 10: Oregon
March 31: South Dakota


US Elections Democratic and Republican Debates Dates 2020

2020
January
 


January 14: The seventh Democratic debate will take place in Des Moines, Iowa at Drake University.
February
February 7: The eighth Democratic debate will take place in Goffstown, New Hampshire at St. Anselm College.
February 15–17: The Moving America Forward Infrastructure Forum will be held at University of Nevada, Las Vegas, by the IUOE, ASCE, TWUA, ARTBA, APTA, AEM, and other groups. Infrastructure policy will be discussed, with a focus on transportation, water, and broadband issues.
February 19: The ninth Democratic debate will take place in Las Vegas, Nevada.
February 25: The tenth Democratic debate will take place in Charleston, South Carolina at The Gaillard Center

United States Presidential Election 2020 Details


US Elections Democratic and Republican Primary and caucuses Dates 2020

 

The following primary and caucus dates have been scheduled by state statutes or state party decisions, but are subject to change pending legislation, state party delegate selection plans, or the decisions of state secretaries of state:
February 3: Iowa caucuses
February 11: New Hampshire primary
February 22: Nevada caucuses
February 29: South Carolina primary

March 3: Super Tuesday (Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Virginia primaries); American Samoa caucuses; Democrats Abroad party-run primary for expatriates features a March 3–10 voting period.
March 10: Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, and Washington primaries; North Dakota firehouse caucuses (identical to a party-run primary).
March 14: Northern Mariana Islands caucuses
March 17: Arizona, Florida, Illinois, and Ohio primaries
March 24: Georgia primary
 


March 29: Puerto Rico primary
April 4: Alaska, Hawaii, and Louisiana primaries; Wyoming caucuses
April 7: Wisconsin primary
April 28: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island primaries
May 2: Kansas primary; Guam caucuses
May 5: Indiana primary
May 12: Nebraska and West Virginia primaries
May 19: Kentucky and Oregon primaries
June 2: Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota primaries
June 6: United States Virgin Islands caucuses
June 16: District of Columbia primary (bill proposing a move to June 2 has been approved by the DC Council and now only awaits final approval by the U.S. Congress for enactment)
The 57 states, districts, territories, or other constituencies with elections of pledged delegates to decide the Democratic presidential nominee, currently plan to hold the first major determining step for these elections via 50 primaries[o] and seven caucuses (Iowa, Nevada, Wyoming, and four territories). The number of states holding caucuses decreased from 14 in the 2016 nomination process to only three in 2020

 

Source: wikipedia.org

United Kingdom general Election results 2019 live by Party Candidates

United Kingdom general Election results 2019 live by Party Candidates

The United Kingdom general Election results 2019 live is scheduled to be held on Thursday 12 December 2019. It is to be held under the provisions of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019, two and a half years after the previous general election in June 2017.

The 2019 election is due to be the first UK general election to be held in December since 1923, and was arranged at short notice in late October. Each parliamentary constituency of the United Kingdom elects one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons using the first-past-the-post voting system. This indirectly elects the government, which is formed by a party or coalition of parties that can command the confidence of a majority of MPs in the Commons. Both majority and minority governments are possible election outcomes.


 

United Kingdom general Election Results

Party and leader Leader Seats Share Count
Conservative Party

Boris Johnson
365 43.60% 1,39,66,565
Labour Party

Jeremy Corbyn
203 32.20% 1,02,95,607
Scottish National Party

Nicola Sturgeon
48 3.90% 1242372
Liberal Democrats

Jo Swinson
11 11.60% 3696423
Democratic Unionist Party

Arlene Foster
8 0.80% 244128
Sinn Féin

Mary Lou McDonald
7 0.60% 181853
Plaid Cymru

Adam Price
4 0.50% 153265
Green Party

Jonathan Bartley & Siân Berry Am
1 2.70% 865697
Brexit Party

Nigel Farage
     
UK Independence Party

Patricia Mountain
     
Other parties

  3 2.00% 700886

Dates United Kingdom general Election 2019 

 

Further information: Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019

The deadline for delivery of candidates' nomination papers was 14 November. The election is scheduled for 12 December 2019, with polling stations opening at 7am and closing at 10pm.

This date occurred despite the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 (FTPA), which introduced fixed-term parliaments to the United Kingdom, with elections scheduled on the first Thursday in May of the fifth year after the previous general election. This would have led to an election on 5 May 2022.On 29 October 2019, the House of Commons passed the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 which circumvented the FTPA so as to hold a December election. The House of Lords followed suit the following day, with Royal Assent the day afterward.

Due to the impasse about the Brexit withdrawal agreement, some political commentators in 2019 considered an early election to be highly likely. In January 2019 a vote of no confidence in Theresa May's government was called by the Labour Party. If passed, and no alternative government could be formed, this would have resulted in a general election, but this motion failed. After becoming Prime Minister in the summer, Boris Johnson made three attempts at a vote for an early general election under the terms of the FTPA, but each failed to achieve the required two-thirds supermajority.The eventually successful bill, which required only a simple majority to pass (though it could be amended during its passage through Parliament), was proposed by the Liberal Democrat and Scottish National parties on 28 October and adopted by the government the following day (albeit with a Thursday 12 December date rather than Monday 9 December proposed by the opposition parties). An amendment changing the date to 9 December failed by 315 votes to 295.The final Commons vote on the bill passed by 438 votes to 20.

The election would be the first UK general election in December since 1923, and the first general election to be held by virtue of an Act of Parliament.

Tuesday 29 October

Passage of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 through the House of Commons

Wednesday 30 October

Passage of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 through the House of Lords

Thursday 31 October

Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 receives Royal Assent and comes into force immediately. The Act sets 12 December as the date for the next parliamentary general election.

Wednesday 6 November

Dissolution of Parliament (the 57th) and official start of the campaign. Beginning of purdah. Royal Proclamation summoning a new Parliament and setting the date for its first meeting issued.

Thursday 7 November

Receipt of writ – legal documents declaring election issued

From Friday 8 November

Notice of election given in constituencies

Thursday 14 November

Nominations of candidates close

Saturday 16 November

Candidates lists are published for each constituency

Thursday 21 November

Deadline to register for a postal vote at 5pm (Northern Ireland)[33]

Tuesday 26 November

Deadline to register for a postal vote at 5pm (Great Britain)[33]

Deadline for registering to vote at 11:59pm[33]

Wednesday 4 December

Deadline to register for a proxy vote at 5pm. (Exemptions apply for emergencies.)

Thursday 12 December

Polling Day – polls open 7am to 10pm

Friday 13 December

Results to be announced for the majority of the 650 constituencies. End of purdah.

Tuesday 17 December

First meeting of the new (58th) Parliament of the United Kingdom, for the formal election of a Speaker of the Commons and the swearing-in of members, ahead of the State Opening of the new Parliament's first session.


The Electoral system of United Kingdom​ 

Each parliamentary constituency of the United Kingdom elects one MP to the House of Commons using the "first past the post" system. If one party obtains a majority of seats, then that party is entitled to form the Government, with its leader as Prime Minister. If the election results in no single party having a majority, there is a hung parliament. In this case, the options for forming the Government are either a minority government or a coalition.


United Kingdom​ party and Leaders  

Leader

Party

Theresa May

Conservative

Jeremy Corbyn

Labour

Nicola Sturgeon

SNP

Tim Farron

Liberal Democrats

Arlene Foster

DUP

Gerry Adams

Sinn Féin


United Kingdom​ Past Elections Results 

Great Britain

Major parties (parties with multiple MPs at dissolution or those that currently have multiple MEPs) that are contesting this election in Great Britain are shown in the table below with their results at the 2017 general election, ordered by the number of seats they won.

Party

Party leader(s)

Last election

Seats at

% of

Seats

dissolution

votes

 

Conservative Party

Boris Johnson

42.40%

317

298

Labour Party

Jeremy Corbyn

40.00%

262

244

Scottish National Party

Nicola Sturgeon

3.00%

35

35

Liberal Democrats

Jo Swinson

7.40%

12

21

Change UK

Anna Soubry

New party

5

Plaid Cymru

Adam Price

0.50%

4

4

Green Party of England and Wales

Jonathan Bartley

1.60%

1

1

Siân Berry

Brexit Party

Nigel Farage

New party

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Ireland

While a number of UK parties organise in Northern Ireland (including the Labour Party, which does not field candidates) and others field candidates for election (most notably the Conservatives), the main Northern Ireland parties are different from those in the rest of the UK.

Some parties in Northern Ireland operate on an all-Ireland basis, including Sinn Féin and Aontú, who are abstensionist parties and do not take up any Commons seats to which they are elected. The only independent elected to Parliament in 2017, Sylvia Hermon, represented North Down but is not standing in 2019.

For the 2019 election, there are a total of 102 candidates in Northern Ireland.

Party

Leader

Last election

Seats at

Contesting seats

 

dissolution

 

(out of

18 in total)

 

 

%

(in NI)

Seats

 

Democratic Unionist Party

Arlene Foster

36.00%

10

10

17 seats

 

Sinn Féin

Mary Lou McDonald

29.40%

7

7

15 seats

 

Social Democratic & Labour Party

Colum Eastwood

11.70%

0

0

15 seats

 

Ulster Unionist Party

Steve Aiken

10.30%

0

0

16 seats

 

Alliance Party

Naomi Long

7.90%

0

0

18 seats

 

Aontú

Peadar Tóibín

New party

0

7 seats

 

NI Conservatives

Neil Johnston

0.70%

0

0

4 seats

 

(Leader in NI)

 

Green Party of Northern Ireland

Clare Bailey

0.90%

0

0

3 seats

 

People Before Profit

None[n 15]

0.40%

0

0

2 seats

 

​Second round Guinea-Bissau Presidential election Date Result Voting Live 2019

​Second round Guinea-Bissau Presidential election Date Result Voting Live 2019 

 

Presidential elections were held in Guinea-Bissau on 24 November 2019. As no candidate received a majority of the vote, a second round will be held on 29 December. Incumbent president José Mário Vaz finished fourth in the first round of voting, failing to progress to the runoff.


Second round Guinea-Bissau Presidential election Live Voting

1.Guinea-Bissau picks president after weeks of political unrest.

2.Guinea-Bissau Votes On New President To Break Political Deadlock.

3.Guinea-Bissau to pick president after years of chaos.


The Electoral system of Guinea-Bissau

The 102 members of the National People's Assembly are elected by two methods; 100 are elected using closed-list proportional representation from 27 multi-member constituencies, whilst two are elected from single-member constituencies representing expatriate citizens in Africa and Europe.


 Second round Guinea-Bissau Parties and leaders  

Nominee

Party

Domingos Simões Pereira

PAIGC

Umaro Sissoco Embaló

Madem G15

 


Second round Guinea-Bissau Presidential election Results Live 2019

Candidate

Party

First round

Second round

Votes

%

Votes

%

Domingos Simões Pereira

PAIGC

222,870

40.13

 

 

Umaro Sissoco Embaló

Madem G15

153,530

27.65

 

 

Nuno Gomes Nabiam

Assembly of the People United

73,063

13.16

 

 

José Mário Vaz

Independent

68,933

12.41

 

 

Carlos Gomes Júnior

Independent

14,766

2.66

 

 

Baciro Djá

Patriotic Front of National Salvation

7,126

1.28

 

 

Vicente Fernandes

Democratic Convergence Party

4,250

0.76

 

 

Mamadú Iaia Djaló

New Democracy Party

2,813

0.51

 

 

Idrissa Djaló

National Unity Party

2,569

0.46

 

 

Mutaro Intai Djabi

Independent

2,385

0.43

 

 

Gabriel Fernando Indi

United Social Democratic Party

1,982

0.36

 

 

António Afonso Té

Republican Party for Independence and Development

1,061

0.19

 

 

Invalid/blank votes

11,125

 

 

Total

566,473

100

 

100

Registered voters/turnout

761,676

74.37

 

 

Source: CNE

 

 

 

 

 

 

Croatian presidential Election Voting Results 2019 Candidates Live

Croatian presidential Election Voting Results 2019 Candidates Live

Croatian presidential Election Dates 2019

Croatian presidential Election Date: 22 December 2019​ 

Presidential elections will be held in Croatia on 22 December 2019. If no candidate receives a majority of all votes cast (including blank and invalid ballots), a second round will take place on 5 January 2020 between the two candidates with the highest number of votes in the first round. They will be the seventh presidential elections since the first direct ones were held in 1992.

The decision to call the election was made by the Croatian Government during its session on 14 November 2019. Potential candidates were required to gather at least 10,000 signatures from Croatian citizens who have reached the age of 18 in order for their candidacy to become official and for their name to appear on the ballot. They were allocated a time frame of 12 days to accomplish this and thus had until midnight local time on 3 December 2019 to present their signatures to the State Electoral Commission. A total of twelve candidates submitted signatures by the deadline and the commission then proceeded to verify the signatures within the following 48 hours, presenting a final list of eleven approved candidates on 5 December 2019.


Croatian presidential Election Voting Live 2019 

1. Past Still Present in Three-Horse Race for Croatian Presidency

  • Anja Vladisavljevic
  • Zagreb
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2. Croatian presidential election set for December 22 November 26, 2019.

3. Croatia's election commission confirms 11 presidential candidates.


Croatian Parties and Leaders

Leader

Party

Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović

Independent

Zoran Milanović

SDP

Miroslav Škoro

Independent

Mislav Kolakušić

Independent

Dalija Orešković

Independent

Ivan Pernar

SIP


Croatian past election results 

First Round

Date(s)-Conducted

Polling-Organisation/Client

Ivo-Josipović

Kolinda-Grabar-Kitarović

Milan-Kujundžić

Ivan-Sinčić

Others

Undecided-/-none

 
 

28-Dec

Exit-polls

38.80%

38.10%

5.70%

15.90%

 

19-Dec

Ipsos-puls-for-Novatv

46.50%

34.90%

7.20%

9.20%

 

18-Dec

Promocija-Plus-for-RTL

42.10%

30.50%

9.30%

7.50%

10.60%

 

4-Dec

Promocija-plus-for-RTL

42.30%

28.30%

11.20%

9.50%

8.70%

 

6-Sep

Promocija-plus

48.90%

32.50%

6.80%

   

4-Sep

Ipsos-puls

45.50%

30.90%

2.10%

9.40%

12.10%

 

4-Aug

Promocija-plus

48.40%

33.60%

4.80%

3.20%

10.00%

 

1-3-Jul

Promocija-plus

49.20%

35.20%

4.30%

1.80%

9.40%

 

June

Promocija-plus

50.10%

29.20%

6.20%

4.80%

9.60%

 

June

Ipsos-puls

50.30%

37.30%

 

12.40%

 

May

Promocija-plus

52.50%

27.00%

6.10%

5.90%

8.60%

 

April

Promocija-plus

51.60%

27.20%

4.50%

8.60%

8.20%

 

March

Promocija-plus

52.20%

28.40%

8.80%

10.70%

 

February

Promocija-plus

54.00%

24.00%

10.30%

11.70%

 

January

Promocija-plus

51.70%

17.40%

19.90%

11.00%

Second Round

Date(s) Conducted

Polling Organisation/Client

Ivo Josipović

Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović

Undecided

11-Jan

Exit polls

48.60%

51.40%

0%

18-Dec

Promocija Plus for RTL

52.00%

41.30%

6.70%

4-Dec

Promocija plus for RTL

50.90%

41.40%

7.70%

 

United Kingdom general Election live voting 2019

United Kingdom general Election live voting 2019

The 2019 United Kingdom general election is scheduled to be held on Thursday 12 December 2019. It is to be held under the provisions of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019, two and a half years after the previous general election in June 2017.

The 2019 election is due to be the first UK general election to be held in December since 1923, and was arranged at short notice in late October. Each parliamentary constituency of the United Kingdom elects one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons using the first-past-the-post voting system. This indirectly elects the government, which is formed by a party or coalition of parties that can command the confidence of a majority of MPs in the Commons. Both majority and minority governments are possible election outcomes.


 

United Kingdom general Election Live Voting 

2019 UK general election results

326 needed for majority

Official · 633/650 seats

Party and leader

Seats

Share

Count

Conservative Party

Boris Johnson

353

43.50%

1,35,29,614

Labour Party

Jeremy Corbyn

202

32.50%

1,01,15,117

Scottish National Party

Nicola Sturgeon

46

3.80%

11,94,195

Liberal Democrats

Jo Swinson

10

11.40%

35,28,143

Democratic Unionist Party

Arlene Foster

8

0.80%

2,44,128

Sinn Féin

Mary Lou McDonald

6

0.50%

1,59,867

Plaid Cymru

Adam Price

4

0.50%

1,53,265

Green Party

Jonathan Bartley & Siân Berry Am

1

2.70%

8,42,215

Brexit Party

Nigel Farage

0

2.10%

6,38,568

UK Independence Party

Patricia Mountain

0

0.10%

22,145

Other parties

3

2.10%

6,63,392

Source: PA Media via dpa-infocom. 

Dates United Kingdom general Election 2019 
 

Further information: Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019

The deadline for delivery of candidates' nomination papers was 14 November. The election is scheduled for 12 December 2019, with polling stations opening at 7am and closing at 10pm.

This date occurred despite the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 (FTPA), which introduced fixed-term parliaments to the United Kingdom, with elections scheduled on the first Thursday in May of the fifth year after the previous general election. This would have led to an election on 5 May 2022.On 29 October 2019, the House of Commons passed the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 which circumvented the FTPA so as to hold a December election. The House of Lords followed suit the following day, with Royal Assent the day afterward.

Due to the impasse about the Brexit withdrawal agreement, some political commentators in 2019 considered an early election to be highly likely. In January 2019 a vote of no confidence in Theresa May's government was called by the Labour Party. If passed, and no alternative government could be formed, this would have resulted in a general election, but this motion failed. After becoming Prime Minister in the summer, Boris Johnson made three attempts at a vote for an early general election under the terms of the FTPA, but each failed to achieve the required two-thirds supermajority.The eventually successful bill, which required only a simple majority to pass (though it could be amended during its passage through Parliament), was proposed by the Liberal Democrat and Scottish National parties on 28 October and adopted by the government the following day (albeit with a Thursday 12 December date rather than Monday 9 December proposed by the opposition parties). An amendment changing the date to 9 December failed by 315 votes to 295.The final Commons vote on the bill passed by 438 votes to 20.

The election would be the first UK general election in December since 1923, and the first general election to be held by virtue of an Act of Parliament.

Tuesday 29 October

Passage of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 through the House of Commons

Wednesday 30 October

Passage of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 through the House of Lords

Thursday 31 October

Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 receives Royal Assent and comes into force immediately. The Act sets 12 December as the date for the next parliamentary general election.

Wednesday 6 November

Dissolution of Parliament (the 57th) and official start of the campaign. Beginning of purdah. Royal Proclamation summoning a new Parliament and setting the date for its first meeting issued.

Thursday 7 November

Receipt of writ – legal documents declaring election issued

From Friday 8 November

Notice of election given in constituencies

Thursday 14 November

Nominations of candidates close

Saturday 16 November

Candidates lists are published for each constituency

Thursday 21 November

Deadline to register for a postal vote at 5pm (Northern Ireland)[33]

Tuesday 26 November

Deadline to register for a postal vote at 5pm (Great Britain)[33]

Deadline for registering to vote at 11:59pm[33]

Wednesday 4 December

Deadline to register for a proxy vote at 5pm. (Exemptions apply for emergencies.)

Thursday 12 December

Polling Day – polls open 7am to 10pm

Friday 13 December

Results to be announced for the majority of the 650 constituencies. End of purdah.

Tuesday 17 December

First meeting of the new (58th) Parliament of the United Kingdom, for the formal election of a Speaker of the Commons and the swearing-in of members, ahead of the State Opening of the new Parliament's first session.


The Electoral system of United Kingdom​ 

Each parliamentary constituency of the United Kingdom elects one MP to the House of Commons using the "first past the post" system. If one party obtains a majority of seats, then that party is entitled to form the Government, with its leader as Prime Minister. If the election results in no single party having a majority, there is a hung parliament. In this case, the options for forming the Government are either a minority government or a coalition.


United Kingdom​ party and Leaders  

Leader

Party

Theresa May

Conservative

Jeremy Corbyn

Labour

Nicola Sturgeon

SNP

Tim Farron

Liberal Democrats

Arlene Foster

DUP

Gerry Adams

Sinn Féin


United Kingdom​ Past Elections Results 

Great Britain

Major parties (parties with multiple MPs at dissolution or those that currently have multiple MEPs) that are contesting this election in Great Britain are shown in the table below with their results at the 2017 general election, ordered by the number of seats they won.

Party

Party leader(s)

Last election

Seats at

% of

Seats

dissolution

votes

 

Conservative Party

Boris Johnson

42.40%

317

298

Labour Party

Jeremy Corbyn

40.00%

262

244

Scottish National Party

Nicola Sturgeon

3.00%

35

35

Liberal Democrats

Jo Swinson

7.40%

12

21

Change UK

Anna Soubry

New party

5

Plaid Cymru

Adam Price

0.50%

4

4

Green Party of England and Wales

Jonathan Bartley

1.60%

1

1

Siân Berry

Brexit Party

Nigel Farage

New party

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Ireland

While a number of UK parties organise in Northern Ireland (including the Labour Party, which does not field candidates) and others field candidates for election (most notably the Conservatives), the main Northern Ireland parties are different from those in the rest of the UK.

Some parties in Northern Ireland operate on an all-Ireland basis, including Sinn Féin and Aontú, who are abstensionist parties and do not take up any Commons seats to which they are elected. The only independent elected to Parliament in 2017, Sylvia Hermon, represented North Down but is not standing in 2019.

For the 2019 election, there are a total of 102 candidates in Northern Ireland.

Party

Leader

Last election

Seats at

Contesting seats

 

dissolution

 

(out of

18 in total)

 

 

%

(in NI)

Seats

 

Democratic Unionist Party

Arlene Foster

36.00%

10

10

17 seats

 

Sinn Féin

Mary Lou McDonald

29.40%

7

7

15 seats

 

Social Democratic & Labour Party

Colum Eastwood

11.70%

0

0

15 seats

 

Ulster Unionist Party

Steve Aiken

10.30%

0

0

16 seats

 

Alliance Party

Naomi Long

7.90%

0

0

18 seats

 

Aontú

Peadar Tóibín

New party

0

7 seats

 

NI Conservatives

Neil Johnston

0.70%

0

0

4 seats

 

(Leader in NI)

 

Green Party of Northern Ireland

Clare Bailey

0.90%

0

0

3 seats

 

People Before Profit

None[n 15]

0.40%

0

0

2 seats

 
1 2 3 159