Alabama Senate election dates and Voting Live

Alabama Senate election dates and Voting Live 2020 
Alabama Senate election Dates 2020
Alabama Senate election​ Date: March 3, 2020​ 

Alabama Senate election Voting Live

Incumbent Democrat Doug Jones was elected in a special election in 2017, narrowly defeating Republican nominee Roy Moore. Jones is running for his first full term as a senator.


Alabama Senate election dates and Voting Live 2020 

2017 Republican special election nominee Roy Moore will seek a rematch with Jones. Former senator and attorney general Jeff Sessions is running to return to the seat he occupied until 2017 when he resigned to become attorney general.

Other Republican candidates include evangelist Stanley Adair, Congressman Bradley Byrne, state representative Arnold Mooney, community activist Ruth Page Nelson, and former Auburn University football head coach Tommy Tuberville. Secretary of State John Merrill was also a candidate but has suspended his campaign. Independent candidates include Mike Parrish, Jarmal Sanders, and Marcus Williams.


The Electoral system of Alabama

  • In Alabama, state legislators (including senators and representatives) are elected via plurality vote in single-winner contests.
  • State executive officers (including the governor, secretary of state, etc.) are elected via plurality vote in single-winner contests.
  • United States Senators and Representatives are also elected via plurality vote in single-winner contests

Alabama Senate election Party and candidate

  • Stanley Adair (Republican)
  • Bradley Byrne (Republican)
  • Doug Jones (Democratic)
  • Arnold Mooney (Republican)
  • Roy Moore (Republican)
  • Ruth Page Nelson (Republican)
  • Mike Parrish (Independent)
  • Jarmal Sanders (Independent)
  • Jeff Sessions (Republican)
  • Tommy Tuberville (Republican)
  • Marcus Williams (Independent)

Alabama Elections Results

#To Be Announced


 Past Alabama Elections Results 

Party

Candidate

Votes

%

 

Democratic

Doug Jones

109,105

66.1

 

Democratic

Robert Kennedy Jr.

29,215

17.7

 

Democratic

Michael Hansen

11,105

6.7

 

Democratic

Will Boyd

8,010

4.9

 

Democratic

Jason Fisher

3,478

2.1

 

Democratic

Brian McGee

1,450

0.9

 

Democratic

Charles Nana

1,404

0.9

 

Democratic

Vann Caldwell

1,239

0.8

Total votes

165,006

100.0%

Seventh Democratic debate Des Moines Iowa 2020 Date Results Candidates

Seventh Democratic debate Des Moines Iowa 2020 Date Results Candidates

 

US Map Eelctions

The 2020 United States presidential election, scheduled for Tuesday, November 3, 2020, will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. Voters will select presidential electors who in turn on December 14, 2020, will either elect a new president and vice president or re-elect the incumbents. In the event that no candidate receives the minimum 270 electoral votes needed to win the election, the United States House of Representatives will select the president from three candidates that received the most electoral votes, and the United States Senate will select the vice president from the candidates that received the two highest totals. The series of presidential primary elections and caucuses are likely to be held during the first six months of 2020. This nominating process is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots selecting a slate of delegates to a political party's nominating convention, who then in turn elect their party's presidential nominee.


US Elections Democratic and Republican Debates Dates 2020

 

  1. Also Read: US County Result 
  2. Also Read: US Election Result
  3. US United States Population Demographics Religion Percentage 2017 By City Immigrants
  4. USA United States Muslim Population Percentage By City Demographics Religion

2020
January
 


January 14: The seventh Democratic debate will take place in Des Moines, Iowa at Drake University.

The debate, scheduled for Jan. 14, will be hosted by CNN in
 It is slated to occur just weeks before Iowa's Feb. 3 caucuses.
To qualify for the January, candidates must have:
•Received 5% or more support in at least four different polls, which may be national polls or state polls in the early voting states of Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina or Nevada. That’s up from 4% for the December debate, held Thursday night. To
•Received donations from at least 225,000 total donors and at least 1,000 donors in at least 20 states. That’s up from 200,000 total donors and 800 donors in 20 states for the December debate.

United States Presidential Election 2020 Details


US Elections Democratic and Republican Primary and caucuses Dates 2020

 

The following primary and caucus dates have been scheduled by state statutes or state party decisions, but are subject to change pending legislation, state party delegate selection plans, or the decisions of state secretaries of state:
February 3: Iowa caucuses
February 11: New Hampshire primary
February 22: Nevada caucuses
February 29: South Carolina primary

March 3: Super Tuesday (Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Virginia primaries); American Samoa caucuses; Democrats Abroad party-run primary for expatriates features a March 3–10 voting period.
March 10: Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, and Washington primaries; North Dakota firehouse caucuses (identical to a party-run primary).
March 14: Northern Mariana Islands caucuses
March 17: Arizona, Florida, Illinois, and Ohio primaries
March 24: Georgia primary
 


March 29: Puerto Rico primary
April 4: Alaska, Hawaii, and Louisiana primaries; Wyoming caucuses
April 7: Wisconsin primary
April 28: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island primaries
May 2: Kansas primary; Guam caucuses
May 5: Indiana primary
May 12: Nebraska and West Virginia primaries
May 19: Kentucky and Oregon primaries
June 2: Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota primaries
June 6: United States Virgin Islands caucuses
June 16: District of Columbia primary (bill proposing a move to June 2 has been approved by the DC Council and now only awaits final approval by the U.S. Congress for enactment)
The 57 states, districts, territories, or other constituencies with elections of pledged delegates to decide the Democratic presidential nominee, currently plan to hold the first major determining step for these elections via 50 primaries[o] and seven caucuses (Iowa, Nevada, Wyoming, and four territories). The number of states holding caucuses decreased from 14 in the 2016 nomination process to only three in 2020

 

Source: wikipedia.org

United States Primary Candidate Filling deadline Dates 2020

United States Primary Candidate Filling deadline Dates 2020

 

US Map Eelctions

The 2020 United States presidential election, scheduled for Tuesday, November 3, 2020, will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. Voters will select presidential electors who in turn on December 14, 2020, will either elect a new president and vice president or re-elect the incumbents. In the event that no candidate receives the minimum 270 electoral votes needed to win the election, the United States House of Representatives will select the president from three candidates that received the most electoral votes, and the United States Senate will select the vice president from the candidates that received the two highest totals. The series of presidential primary elections and caucuses are likely to be held during the first six months of 2020. This nominating process is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots selecting a slate of delegates to a political party's nominating convention, who then in turn elect their party's presidential nominee.


US Primary Candidate Filling Deadlines

  1. Also Read: US County Result 
  2. Also Read: US Election Result
  3. US United States Population Demographics Religion Percentage 2017 By City Immigrants
  4. USA United States Muslim Population Percentage By City Demographics Religion

Primary candidate filing deadlines
Starting in September 2019, several states began accepting petitions and other materials from the presidential campaigns to facilitate getting their person on the ballot during the primary. Such filings are generally not required in states that instead have caucuses conducted directly by the political parties.
Requirements for filing vary by state. Some state may require candidates to submit petitions with thousands of signatures from supporters within the state. In other states, their secretaries of state or elections officials determine an approved list of "generally advocated or recognized candidates in national news media"; those not put on these lists must then submit signature petitions to get on the primary ballot.
In some states like Florida,Georgia,Kansas,Massachusetts,Minnesota,South Carolina,and Washington,primary candidates instead file directly with their state political party, who then in turn submit their list of candidates to their state's Secretary of state/elections department.
The following is a list of deadlines for those states where the candidates must file directly with their secretary of state or state elections department:
Petition for those candidates not determined by the state as a "generally advocated or recognized candidate by the national news media"
2019
December 24: Missouri
2020
January 3: Illinois
January 15: Mississippi
January 24: Maryland
January 25: West Virginia
January 28: Indiana,Kentucky,Wisconsin
February 28 Delaware
March 4: District of Columbia
March 6: Connecticut
March 9: Montana
March 10: Oregon
March 31: South Dakota


US Elections Democratic and Republican Debates Dates 2020

2020
January
 


January 14: The seventh Democratic debate will take place in Des Moines, Iowa at Drake University.
February
February 7: The eighth Democratic debate will take place in Goffstown, New Hampshire at St. Anselm College.
February 15–17: The Moving America Forward Infrastructure Forum will be held at University of Nevada, Las Vegas, by the IUOE, ASCE, TWUA, ARTBA, APTA, AEM, and other groups. Infrastructure policy will be discussed, with a focus on transportation, water, and broadband issues.
February 19: The ninth Democratic debate will take place in Las Vegas, Nevada.
February 25: The tenth Democratic debate will take place in Charleston, South Carolina at The Gaillard Center

United States Presidential Election 2020 Details


US Elections Democratic and Republican Primary and caucuses Dates 2020

 

The following primary and caucus dates have been scheduled by state statutes or state party decisions, but are subject to change pending legislation, state party delegate selection plans, or the decisions of state secretaries of state:
February 3: Iowa caucuses
February 11: New Hampshire primary
February 22: Nevada caucuses
February 29: South Carolina primary

March 3: Super Tuesday (Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Virginia primaries); American Samoa caucuses; Democrats Abroad party-run primary for expatriates features a March 3–10 voting period.
March 10: Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, and Washington primaries; North Dakota firehouse caucuses (identical to a party-run primary).
March 14: Northern Mariana Islands caucuses
March 17: Arizona, Florida, Illinois, and Ohio primaries
March 24: Georgia primary
 


March 29: Puerto Rico primary
April 4: Alaska, Hawaii, and Louisiana primaries; Wyoming caucuses
April 7: Wisconsin primary
April 28: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island primaries
May 2: Kansas primary; Guam caucuses
May 5: Indiana primary
May 12: Nebraska and West Virginia primaries
May 19: Kentucky and Oregon primaries
June 2: Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota primaries
June 6: United States Virgin Islands caucuses
June 16: District of Columbia primary (bill proposing a move to June 2 has been approved by the DC Council and now only awaits final approval by the U.S. Congress for enactment)
The 57 states, districts, territories, or other constituencies with elections of pledged delegates to decide the Democratic presidential nominee, currently plan to hold the first major determining step for these elections via 50 primaries[o] and seven caucuses (Iowa, Nevada, Wyoming, and four territories). The number of states holding caucuses decreased from 14 in the 2016 nomination process to only three in 2020

 

Source: wikipedia.org

US Electoral college Live Final Results 2020 Voting by States Candidates

US Electoral college Live Final Results 2020 Voting by States Candidates

On 19 december electoral college will be Voting 2020 Live and the Electoral college Results would decide US Elections and who would be US president. How electoral college elects Votes US presidential Elections 2020 is a complex process. The Live Voting Results for  Electoral College Voting results whether Trump or Clinton won has been updated here.


Electoral College Live Voting Updates for US President 2016

Read More: How Does Electoral College Work

  1. Trump won 304/538 Electors and would be next US president.
  2. Final Count Tally is Donald Trump – 304,
    Hillary Clinton – 221
    Other- 6
  3. Latest at 1 pm: Donald Trump, 68
    Hillary Clinton, 46
  4. The Final Formal announement of Results of Electoral College Count would be announced on January 6, 2017.
  5. When coungress would meet in a joint session and then the VP Joe Biden would announce final count for who wud be president and vice president.
  6. In CPAN TV Channel, the show live telecast would start at 10:50 a.m.
  7. Pennsylvania would vote at 12 p.m.
  8. Michigan votes will be broadcast at 2 p.m.
  9. The channel would cover Illinois and Virginia
  10. California Live streaming to start from 2 PM.
  11. Connecticut voting starts at 12 PM.
  12. Delaware Electoral College Voting to start at 11:30 am
  13. Indiana at 10 AM.
  14. Louisiana voting timing is 11:30 am
  15. C-SPAN would broadcast Michigan voting live.
  16. Ohio at 12PM,  Oregon 11AM, Pennsylvania time not known, Texas at 2 PM
  1. Also Read: US Recount election Results
  2. Also Read: US County Result 
  3. Also Read: USElection Result

How Electoral College Votes by State US President 2020

  1. Alabama- 9  Trump.
  2. Alaska- 3  Trump.
  3. Arizona – 11  Trump.
  4. Arkansas – 6  Trump.
  5. Colorado- 9  Clinton
  6. Connecticut- 7  Hillary Clinton.
  7. Delaware- 3  Hillary Clinton.
  8. Florida – 29  Trump.
  9. Georgia- 16  Trump.
  10. Idaho- 4  Trump.
  11. Illinois- 20  Clinton.
  12. Indiana- 11  Trump.
  13. Kansas- six  Trump,
  14. Kentucky- 8  Trump.
  15. Louisiana- 8  Trump.
  16. Maine and Maine – Trump – 1 electoral and Clinton -3.
  17. Maryland- 10  Hillary Clinton.
  18. Michigan – 16  Trump.
  19. Minnesota- 10  Clinton.
  20. Missouri- 10  Trump.
  21. Mississippi- 6  Trump.
  22. Montana- 3 Trump.
  23. Nebraska – 5 voted for Trump.
  24. New Hampshire- 4  Clinton.
  25. New Jersey- 14  Clinton
  26. New Mexico- 5  Clinton.
  27. New York – 29  Hillary Clinton.
  28. North Carolina- 15  Trump.
  29. North Dakota- 3  Trump.
  30. Ohio – 18  Trump.
  31. Oklahoma – 7  Trump.
  32. Oregon- 7  Clinton.
  33. Pennsylvania- 20 votes for Trump
  34. Rhode Island- 4  Clinton.
  35. South Carolina- 9  Trump.
  36. South Dakota- 3  Trump.
  37. Tennessee – 11  Trump.
  38. Texas – 36/38 electoral votes to Trump.
  39. Utah- 6  Trump
  40. Vermont- 3  Clinton.
  41. Virginia- 13  Clinton
  42. Washington – 8 for Clinton, 3 voted for Colin Powell, and 1 for Faith Spotted Eagle.
  43. West Virginia- 5  Trump.
  44. Wisconsin- 10  Donald Trump.
  45. Wyoming- 3  Trump

How Electoral College Elects US President 2020

  1. On 19 December 538 electoral voters will physically write down the name of the candidate they want to be president and who they want to be vice president.
  2. The winner has to get minimum 270 electoral college votes. Mr Trump as of now is getting 306 votes compared to Hillary Clinton’s 232 votes.  
  3.  
  4. According to US election history, more than 99 per cent of electors have voted as pledged. But they don’t have to by law.
  5. They are called faithless electors who vote for another candidate usually face a relatively small penalty of around $1,000.
  6. They could be disqualified and replaced by a substitute elector. So far no elector has been prosecuted.electoral college 2016

Who counts the electoral votes?

On Friday, Jan. 6, at 1 p.m., members of the House and Senate will meet in the House chamber to count those votes. Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., as the departing president of the Senate, is expected to preside over the count, during which every state’s vote is opened and announced in alphabetical order.

Mr. Biden will then declare the winner based on who has the majority of votes — at least 270. 


The United States Electoral College is a mechanism established by Article Two of the United States Constitution in the indirect United States presidential election system to select the President of the United States and Vice President of the United States. Citizens of the United States vote in each state at a general election to choose a slate of "electors" pledged to vote for a party's candidate
There are currently a total of 538 electors, corresponding to the 435 Representatives, the 100 Senators, plus three electors for the District of Columbia as provided for in the Twenty-third Amendment. Each state chooses electors amounting to the combined total of its Senators and Representatives. The Constitution bars any federal official, elected or appointed, from being an elector. The Office of the Federal Register is charged with administering the Electoral College.In most elections, the Electoral College has elected the candidate who received the most popular votes nationwide, except in four elections

 

United States presidential Election​ 2020 Voting Results Candidates Live

United States presidential election​ 2020 Voting Results Candidates Live

United States presidential election Dates 2020

United States presidential election Date: November 3, 2020

 

 The 2020 United States presidential election, scheduled for Tuesday, November 3, 2020, will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. Voters will select presidential electors who in turn on December 14, 2020, will either elect a new president and vice president or re-elect the incumbents. If no candidate receives the minimum 270 electoral votes needed to win the election, the United States House of Representatives will elect the president from three candidates that received the most electoral votes, and the United States Senate will select the vice president from the candidates that received the two highest totals. The series of presidential primary elections and caucuses are likely to be held during the first six months of 2020. This nominating process is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots selecting a slate of delegates to a political party's nominating convention, who then, in turn, elect their party's presidential nominee and his or her vice presidential running mate.


United States presidential election Voting Live 2020

  • 8 Democratic primary debates left.
  • 4 general election debates in 2020.
  • 3 months until the Iowa caucuses.
  • 100 days until New Hampshire.
  • 6 states no longer holding Republican primaries or caucuses.
  • About 2,551 delegates to attend Republican National Convention.
  • 270 electoral votes needed to win the presidency.
  • 35 seats in the Senate.
  • 11 governor races.

The Electoral system of United States presidential election
 

The Electoral College is a body of electors established by the United States Constitution, constituted every four years for the sole purpose of electing the president and vice president of the United States. The Electoral College consists of 538 electors, and an absolute majority of 270 electoral votes is required to win the election. Pursuant to Article II, Section 1, Clause 2, each state legislature determines the manner by which its state's electors are chosen. Each state's number of electors is equal to the combined total of the state's membership in the Senate and House of Representatives; currently, there are 100 senators and 435 representatives. Additionally, the Twenty-third Amendment, ratified in 1961, provides that the District of Columbia (D.C.) is entitled to the number of electors it would have if it were a state, but no more than the least populated state U.S. territories are not entitled to any electors as they are not states


United States presidential Parties and leaders

 

Name of candidates

Name of party

Bill Weld

Republican Party presidential primaries

Donald Trump

Republican Party presidential primaries

Joe Walsh

Republican Party presidential primaries

Bill Weld

Republican Party presidential primaries

Michael Bennet

Democratic Party

Joe Biden

Democratic Party

Cory Booker

Democratic Party

Steve Bullock

Democratic Party

Pete Buttigieg

Democratic Party

Julián Castro

Democratic Party

John Delaney

Democratic Party

Tulsi Gabbard

Democratic Party

Kamala Harris

Democratic Party

Amy Klobuchar

Democratic Party

Wayne Messam

Democratic Party

Bernie Sanders

Democratic Party

Joe Sestak

Democratic Party

Tom Steyer

Democratic Party

Max Abramson

Libertarian Party

Ken Armstrong

Libertarian Party

Dan Behrman

Libertarian Party

Souraya Faas

Libertarian Party

Jacob Hornberger

Libertarian Party

Adam Kokesh

Libertarian Party

John McAfee

Libertarian Party

Kim Ruff

Libertarian Party

Vermin Supreme

Libertarian Party

Arvin Vohra

Libertarian Party

Howie Hawkins

Green Party

Dario Hunter

Green Party

Roland G. Aranjo

Green Party

Sedinam Kinamo Christin
Moyowasifza Curry 
Dennis Lambert

Green Party

David Rolde

Green Party

Chad Wilson

Green Party

Brian Carroll

American Solidarity Party

Jerome Segal

Bread and Roses

Don Blankenship

Constitution Party

Mark Charles

Independent

Gloria La Riva

Party for Socialism and Liberation

Phil Collins

Prohibition Party

Jeff Mackler

Socialist Action

Howie Hawkins

Socialist Party USA

 


United States presidential past election results

 

Nominee

Donald Trump

Hillary Clinton

Party

Republican

Democratic

Home state

New York

New York

Running mate

Mike Pence

Tim Kaine

Electoral vote

304

227

Popular vote

62,984,828

65,853,514

Percentage

46.09%

48.18%

 

 

 

United States Presidential Election 2020 Important Dates Schedule

United States Presidential Election 2020 Important Dates Schedule

 

US Map Eelctions

The 2020 United States presidential election, scheduled for Tuesday, November 3, 2020, will be the 59th quadrennial U.S. presidential election. Voters will select presidential electors who in turn on December 14, 2020, will either elect a new president and vice president or re-elect the incumbents. In the event that no candidate receives the minimum 270 electoral votes needed to win the election, the United States House of Representatives will select the president from three candidates that received the most electoral votes, and the United States Senate will select the vice president from the candidates that received the two highest totals. The series of presidential primary elections and caucuses are likely to be held during the first six months of 2020. This nominating process is also an indirect election, where voters cast ballots selecting a slate of delegates to a political party's nominating convention, who then in turn elect their party's presidential nominee.


US Elections Democratic and Republican Debates Dates 2020

2020
January
 


January 14: The seventh Democratic debate will take place in Des Moines, Iowa at Drake University.
February
February 7: The eighth Democratic debate will take place in Goffstown, New Hampshire at St. Anselm College.
February 15–17: The Moving America Forward Infrastructure Forum will be held at University of Nevada, Las Vegas, by the IUOE, ASCE, TWUA, ARTBA, APTA, AEM, and other groups. Infrastructure policy will be discussed, with a focus on transportation, water, and broadband issues.
February 19: The ninth Democratic debate will take place in Las Vegas, Nevada.
February 25: The tenth Democratic debate will take place in Charleston, South Carolina at The Gaillard Center

United States Presidential Election 2020 Details


US Elections Democratic and Republican Primary and caucuses Dates 2020

 

The following primary and caucus dates have been scheduled by state statutes or state party decisions, but are subject to change pending legislation, state party delegate selection plans, or the decisions of state secretaries of state:
February 3: Iowa caucuses
February 11: New Hampshire primary
February 22: Nevada caucuses
February 29: South Carolina primary

March 3: Super Tuesday (Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, and Virginia primaries); American Samoa caucuses; Democrats Abroad party-run primary for expatriates features a March 3–10 voting period.
March 10: Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, and Washington primaries; North Dakota firehouse caucuses (identical to a party-run primary).
March 14: Northern Mariana Islands caucuses
March 17: Arizona, Florida, Illinois, and Ohio primaries
March 24: Georgia primary
 


March 29: Puerto Rico primary
April 4: Alaska, Hawaii, and Louisiana primaries; Wyoming caucuses
April 7: Wisconsin primary
April 28: Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island primaries
May 2: Kansas primary; Guam caucuses
May 5: Indiana primary
May 12: Nebraska and West Virginia primaries
May 19: Kentucky and Oregon primaries
June 2: Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota primaries
June 6: United States Virgin Islands caucuses
June 16: District of Columbia primary (bill proposing a move to June 2 has been approved by the DC Council and now only awaits final approval by the U.S. Congress for enactment)
The 57 states, districts, territories, or other constituencies with elections of pledged delegates to decide the Democratic presidential nominee, currently plan to hold the first major determining step for these elections via 50 primaries[o] and seven caucuses (Iowa, Nevada, Wyoming, and four territories). The number of states holding caucuses decreased from 14 in the 2016 nomination process to only three in 2020

 

Source: wikipedia.org

Minnesota primary election 2019 Results Live Voting Candidates Opinion

Minnesota primary election 2019 Results Live Voting Candidates Opinion

A primary election is an election in which registered voters select a candidate that they believe should be a political party's candidate for elected office to run in the general election. They are also used to choose convention delegates and party leaders. Primaries are state-level elections that take place prior to a general election.

Minnesota state law stipulates that an individual can only participate in a party's primary if he or she "intends to support the nominations made in the primary" in which he or she participates. However, this is generally considered an unenforceable requirement. Consequently, Minnesota's primary is effectively open

Minnesota primary election offices Date 2017 : 13th August 2019

The statewide General election for US presidential race is on November 5, 2019.

Who is Minnesota Governor? –Phil Bryant


Minnesota primary election offices 2019 Results Live

Voting to start on 13th August 2019.

Minnesota primary election offices 2019 Voting Live

  1. Voting to start on 13th August 2019.
  2. Polls will be open 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. in cities throughout Minnesota on Tuesday to select party nominees.

 

Do you Know? US Population Demographics Percentage 2017 by City Religion

 

 


Minnesota primary election municipal offices 2019 Candidates

Coming up….


Minnesota primary election municipal offices 2017 Opinion Poll

No Polls have been published yet.

Florida Registration Vote Online Voter List 2017 Search Information Online Form Status Name ID Details

Florida Registration Vote Online Voter List 2017 Search Information Online Form Status us-map

Register to Vote or Update your Information

Who Can Register to Vote

In order to register to vote in Florida, you must:

  1. Be a Citizen of the United States of America (To be a U.S. citizen, you must be born in the United States or certain U.S. territories, be born to U.S. citizen parents, or be naturalized. Although a lawful permanent resident (commonly referred to as a "green card holder") has the right to live and work in the U.S. on a permanent basis, he or she cannot register or vote). Persons who have U.S citizenship and citizenship from another nation can also register and vote in the U.S;
  2. Be a Florida resident;
  3. Be 18 years old (You may pre-register to vote if you are 16 years old, but you cannot vote until you are 18 years old);
  4. Not have been adjudicated mentally incapacitated with respect to voting in Florida or any other state without having the right to vote restored;
  5. Not have been convicted of a felony without your civil rights having been restored; and
  6. Provide your current and valid Florida driver’s license number or Florida identification card number. If you do not have a Florida driver’s license number or a Florida identification card number then you must provide the last four digits of your Social Security Number. If you do not have any of these items, you must write “none” in the box or field.

State Elections Office Website

Register to vote in Florida

How to do Online Voter Registration in Florida

  1. Florida voter registration deadlines
  2. In Person: 29 days before Election Day.
  3. By Mail: 29 days before Election Day.
  4. Online: N/A
  5. Visit Website https://www.vote.org/register-to-vote/florida/ and then Use Register to Vote Tool to fill out the National Voter Registration Form.
  6. Fill up all details Sign and date your form. This is very important!
  7. Mail or hand-deliver your completed form to the address the site provides.
  8. Make sure you register before the voter registration deadline.

OR you can also official Election Commission site of Florida where detailed step by step points have been mentioned and the required ID proofs required to be submitted like driver's license etc for registration

http://dos.myflorida.com/elections/for-voters/voter-registration/register-to-vote-or-update-your-information/

Populations of Florida Cities
Ranked by Population Size
(Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2010)
Florida 1,88,01,310 Naples city 19,537
    Fort Walton Beach city 19,507
Jacksonville city 8,21,784 DeBary city 19,320
Miami city 3,99,457 Palm Springs village 18,928
Tampa city 3,35,709 Eustis city 18,558
St. Petersburg city 2,44,769 Lynn Haven city 18,493
Orlando city 2,38,300 West Melbourne city 18,355
Hialeah city 2,24,669 Pinecrest village 18,223
Tallahassee city 1,81,376 Belle Glade city 17,467
Fort Lauderdale city 1,65,521 Bartow city 17,298
Port St. Lucie city 1,64,603 Seminole city 17,233
Pembroke Pines city 1,54,750 Cocoa city 17,140
Cape Coral city 1,54,305 Safety Harbor city 16,884
Hollywood city 1,40,768 Punta Gorda city 16,641
Gainesville city 1,24,354 Marco Island city 16,413
Miramar city 1,22,041 Maitland city 15,751
Coral Springs city 1,21,096 Stuart city 15,593
Clearwater city 1,07,685 Vero Beach city 15,220
Miami Gardens city 1,07,167 Opa-locka city 15,219
Palm Bay city 1,03,190 New Port Richey city 14,911
West Palm Beach city 99,919 Callaway city 14,405
Pompano Beach city 99,845 Lake Wales city 14,225
Lakeland city 97,422 West Park city 14,156
Davie town 91,992 Tavares city 13,951
Miami Beach city 87,779 Lady Lake town 13,926
Deltona city 85,182 Lake Mary city 13,822
Plantation city 84,955 Miami Springs city 13,809
Sunrise city 84,439 Longwood city 13,657
Boca Raton city 84,392 Oldsmar city 13,591
Largo city 77,648 Auburndale city 13,507
Melbourne city 76,068 Sweetwater city 13,499
Palm Coast city 75,180 Zephyrhills city 13,288
Deerfield Beach city 75,018 St. Augustine city 12,975
Boynton Beach city 68,217 Niceville city 12,749
Lauderhill city 66,887 Atlantic Beach city 12,655
Weston city 65,333 Palmetto city 12,606
Fort Myers city 62,298 Mount Dora city 12,370
Daytona Beach city 61,005 Key Biscayne village 12,344
Delray Beach city 60,522 Destin city 12,305
Homestead city 60,512 South Daytona city 12,252
Tamarac city 60,427 Lake City city 12,046
Kissimmee city 59,682 Gulfport city 12,029
North Miami city 58,786 Panama City Beach city 12,018
North Port city 57,357 North Palm Beach village 12,015
Wellington village 56,508 Holly Hill city 11,659
Ocala city 56,315 South Miami city 11,657
Port Orange city 56,048 Wilton Manors city 11,632
Jupiter town 55,156 Fernandina Beach city 11,487
Sanford city 53,570 Florida City city 11,245
Margate city 53,284 Cocoa Beach city 11,231
Coconut Creek city 52,909 Orange City city 10,599
Pensacola city 51,923 Palatka city 10,558
Sarasota city 51,917 Miami Shores village 10,493
Bradenton city 49,546 Sebring city 10,491
Pinellas Park city 49,079 Lantana town 10,423
Palm Beach Gardens city 48,452 Lighthouse Point city 10,344
Coral Gables city 46,780 Satellite Beach city 10,109
Doral city 45,704 Cape Canaveral city 9,912
Bonita Springs city 43,914 Minneola city 9,403
Titusville city 43,761 St. Pete Beach city 9,346
Fort Pierce city 41,590 Alachua city 9,059
Apopka city 41,542 Springfield city 8,903
North Miami Beach city 41,523 Avon Park city 8,836
Altamonte Springs city 41,496 Milton city 8,826
Oakland Park city 41,363 Groveland city 8,729
North Lauderdale city 41,023 Orange Park town 8,412
Cutler Bay town 40,286 Palm Beach town 8,348
Ormond Beach city 38,137 Marathon city 8,297
Greenacres city 37,573 Indian Harbour Beach city 8,225
Hallandale Beach city 37,113 Lake Park town 8,155
Panama City city 36,484 Quincy city 7,972
Aventura city 35,762 Brooksville city 7,719
Ocoee city 35,579 Arcadia city 7,637
Dunedin city 35,321 Southwest Ranches town 7,345
St. Cloud city 35,183 Inverness city 7,210
Lake Worth city 34,910 Clewiston city 7,155
Plant City city 34,721 North Bay Village city 7,137
Winter Garden city 34,568 Neptune Beach city 7,037
Royal Palm Beach village 34,140 Perry city 7,017
Winter Haven city 33,874 Green Cove Springs city 6,908
Oviedo city 33,342 Longboat Key town 6,888
Winter Springs city 33,282 Live Oak city 6,850
Lauderdale Lakes city 32,593 Wildwood city 6,709
Riviera Beach city 32,488 Treasure Island city 6,705
Dania Beach city 29,639 Sanibel city 6,469
Miami Lakes town 29,361 Dade City city 6,437
Clermont city 28,742 Macclenny city 6,374
Cooper City city 28,547 Fort Myers Beach town 6,277
Winter Park city 27,852 St. Augustine Beach city 6,176
DeLand city 27,031 Islamorada, Village of Islands village 6,119
Casselberry city 26,241 Marianna city 6,102
Rockledge city 24,926 Pembroke Park town 6,102
Key West city 24,649 Lauderdale-by-the-Sea town 6,056
Temple Terrace city 24,541 Belle Isle city 5,988
Parkland city 23,962 West Miami city 5,965
Tarpon Springs city 23,484 Gulf Breeze city 5,763
Palmetto Bay village 23,410 Surfside town 5,744
New Smyrna Beach city 22,464 Pahokee city 5,649
Sebastian city 21,929 Tequesta village 5,629
Hialeah Gardens city 21,744 Bay Harbor Islands town 5,628
Jacksonville Beach city 21,362 Fort Meade city 5,626
Crestview city 20,978 Okeechobee city 5,621
Sunny Isles Beach city 20,832 Starke city 5,449
Edgewater city 20,750 High Springs city 5,350
Venice city 20,748 Fellsmere city 5,197
Haines City city 20,535 DeFuniak Springs city 5,177
Leesburg city 20,117 Mascotte city 5,101
Bristol city 996 Valparaiso city 5,036
Center Hill city 988 Lake Alfred city 5,015
Cottondale town 933 Wauchula city 5,001
Golden Beach town 919 Greensboro town 602
Pomona Park town 912 Briny Breezes town 601
Palm Shores town 900 Micanopy town 600
Grand Ridge town 892 Ponce de Leon town 598
Jennings town 878 St. Lucie Village town 590
Greenville town 843 Hastings town 580
Medley town 838 Fort White town 567
Jupiter Island town 817 Laurel Hill city 537
Key Colony Beach city 797 Altha town 536
Gulf Stream town 786 Jay town 533
Webster city 785 Reddick town 506
White Springs town 777 Yankeetown town 502
Fanning Springs city 764 Hampton city 500
Penney Farms town 749 Wausau town 383
Lawtey city 730 Esto town 364
Shalimar town 717 La Crosse town 360
Branford town 712 Ocean Breeze Park town 355
Coleman city 703 Lee town 352
Cedar Key city 702 Beverly Beach town 338
Welaka town 701 Brooker town 338
Vernon city 687 St. Marks city 293
Greenwood town 686 Westville town 289
Sea Ranch Lakes village 670 Ebro town 270
Melbourne Village town 662 Raiford town 255
Paxton town 644 Hillcrest Heights town 254
Marineland town 16 Bay Lake city 47
Weeki Wachee city 12 Lazy Lake village 24
Lake Buena Vista city 10 Indian Creek village 86
Kenneth City town 4,980 Bunnell city 2,676
South Pasadena city 4,964 Port Richey city 2,671
Newberry city 4,950 Lake Helen city 2,624
South Bay city 4,876 Hypoluxo town 2,588
LaBelle city 4,640 Oakland town 2,538
Jasper city 4,546 Blountstown city 2,514
Belleview city 4,492 Bal Harbour village 2,513
Flagler Beach city 4,484 Monticello city 2,506
Parker city 4,317 Edgewood city 2,503
Madeira Beach city 4,263 Windermere town 2,462
Daytona Beach Shores city 4,247 Bushnell city 2,418
Indian Rocks Beach city 4,113 Virginia Gardens village 2,375
Fruitland Park city 4,078 El Portal village 2,325
Indian River Shores town 3,901 Graceville city 2,278
Belleair town 3,869 Eagle Lake city 2,255
Mary Esther city 3,851 Chiefland city 2,245
Grant-Valkaria town 3,850 Apalachicola city 2,231
Holmes Beach city 3,836 Lake Placid town 2,223
Mulberry city 3,817 Eatonville town 2,159
Dundee town 3,717 Redington Shores town 2,121
Chattahoochee city 3,652 Malone town 2,088
Chipley city 3,605 Belleair Bluffs city 2,031
Highland Beach town 3,539 Atlantis city 2,005
Umatilla city 3,456 Trenton city 1,999
Port St. Joe city 3,445 Sewall's Point town 1,996
Lake Clarke Shores town 3,376 Wewahitchka city 1,981
Loxahatchee Groves town 3,180 Lake Butler city 1,897
Juno Beach town 3,176 Mangonia Park town 1,888
Crystal River city 3,108 Hillsboro Beach town 1,875
Melbourne Beach town 3,101 Haverhill town 1,873
Hilliard town 3,086 Sneads town 1,849
Biscayne Park village 3,055 Zolfo Springs town 1,827
Ponce Inlet town 3,032 Astatula town 1,810
Midway city 3,004 Oak Hill city 1,792
Frostproof city 2,992 Freeport city 1,787
Bowling Green city 2,930 Ocean Ridge town 1,786
Davenport city 2,888 Havana town 1,754
Madison city 2,843 Pierson town 1,736
Bonifay city 2,793 Dunnellon city 1,733
Carrabelle city 2,778 Cross City town 1,728
Williston city 2,768 Century town 1,698
Malabar town 2,757 Moore Haven city 1,680
Indialantic town 2,720 Crescent City city 1,577
Polk City town 1,562 Interlachen town 1,403
Belleair Beach city 1,560 Keystone Heights city 1,350
Anna Maria city 1,503 St. Leo town 1,340
Montverde town 1,463 Inglis town 1,325
Gretna city 1,460 Mayo town 1,237
Redington Beach town 1,427 Lake Hamilton town 1,231
Baldwin town 1,425 Bradenton Beach city 1,171
Indian Shores town 1,420 South Palm Beach town 1,171
Hawthorne city 1,417 Palm Beach Shores town 1,142
North Redington Beach town 1,417 San Antonio city 1,138
Callahan town 1,123 McIntosh town 452
Archer city 1,118 Glen St. Mary town 437
Bronson town 1,113 Orchid town 415
Howey-in-the-Hills town 1,098 Caryville town 411
Mexico Beach city 1,072 Manalapan town 406
Waldo city 1,015 Everglades city 400
Alford town 489 Jupiter Inlet Colony town 400
Sopchoppy city 457 Cinco Bayou town 383
Bell town 456 Golf village 252
Worthington Springs town 181 Jacob City city 250
Horseshoe Beach town 169 Campbellton town 230
Cloud Lake town 135 Highland Park village 230
Otter Creek town 134 Glen Ridge town 219
Bascom town 121 Noma town 211
Belleair Shore town 109 Layton city 184

ANA Presidential election results live Voting 2017 Gary Adkins New President

ANA Presidential election results live Voting 2017 Gary Adkins New President

What is ANA? About Details

The American Numismatic Association (ANA) is a Colorado Springs, Colorado organization founded in 1891 by Dr. George F. Heath. It was formed to advance the knowledge of numismatics (the study of money) along educational, historical, and scientific lines, as well as enhance interest in the hobby

The ANA has about 24,000 members who receive many benefits, such as discounts, access to website features, and the monthly journal The Numismatist. The ANA's Colorado Springs headquarters houses its administrative offices, library, and money museum. The ANA received a Federal Charter fromnote the United States Congress in 1912

A Board of Governors are in charge of the ANA. Numerous advisory committees help to operate it properly. The ANA has a Young Numismatists program intended to promote interest among youth. The ANA has held annual conventions throughout the nation in most years since 1891, with two per year since 1978. The Farran Zerbe Memorial Award is bestowed upon the most dedicated members. The ANA also maintains a Numismatic Hall of Fame

ANA Presidential Election results 2017

Election results are in for the 2017-2019 term to the American Numismatic Association Board of Governors.
Gary Adkins has been elected as ANA's 60th president and Don Kagin, who ran unopposed, will become vice president.
ANA voting members brought back six incumbents and selected three new candidates. In the contest for the seven board seats, eight members competed. The returning four incumbents won the most votes followed by three new candidates.

For President Votes
Gary Adkins (Minneapolis, Minnesota) 3274
Mike Ellis (Camilla, Georgia) 2007
For Vice President Votes
Don Kagin (Tiburon, California) 1
Candidates for Governor Votes
Col. Steve Ellsworth, Ret. (Brentwood, Tennessee) 4335
Dr. Ralph Ross (Sugar Land, Texas) 4073
Greg Lyon (St. Louis, Missouri) 3953
Paul Montgomery (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) 3860
Thomas J. Uram (Eighty Four, Pennsylvania) 3679
John W. Highfill (Broken Arrow, Oklahoma) 3653
Brian Hendelson (Bridgewater, New Jersey) 3474
Unelected Candidate for Governor Votes
Adam J. Crum (Newport Beach, California) 3378

List of ANA Presidents till Date


List of ANA presidents


William G. Jerrems Jr., 1891–1892
George F. Heath, 1892–1894
August G. Heaton, 1894–1899
Joseph Hooper, 1899–1902
Benjamin P. Wright, 1902–1905
Albert R. Frey, 1905–1908
Farran Zerbe, 1908–1910
John M. Henderson, 1910–1912
Judson P. Brenner, 1912–1914
Frank G. Duffield, 1914–1915
Henry O. Granberg, 1915–1917
Carl Wurtzbach, 1917–1919
Waldo C. Moore, 1919–1921
Moritz Wormser, 1921–1926
Harry H. Yawger, 1926–1927

Charles Markus, 1927–1930
George J. Bauer, 1930–1932
Alden Scott Boyer, 1932–1933
Nelson T. Thorson, 1933–1935
T. James Clarke, 1935–1937
J. Henri Ripstra, 1937–1939
L.W. Hoffecker, 1939–1941
J. Douglas Ferguson, 1941–1943
Martin F. Kortjohn, 1943–1945
V. Leon Belt, 1945–1947
Loyd B. Gettys, 1947–1949
M. Vernon Sheldon, 1949–1951
Joseph Moss, 1951–1953
J. Hewitt Judd, 1953–1955
Leonel C. Panosh, 1955–1957
Oscar H. Dodson, 1957–1961
C.C. Tim Shroyer, 1961–1963
Paul K. Anderson, 1963–1965

Matt H. Rothert, 1965–1967
Arthur Sipe, 1967–1969
Herbert M. Bergen, 1969–1971
John J. Pittman, 1971–1973
Virginia Culver, 1973–1975
Virgil Hancock, 1975–1977
Grover C. Criswell, Jr., 1977–1979
George D. Hatie, 1979–1981
Adna G. Wilde, Jr., 1981–1983
Q. David Bowers, 1983–1985
Florence M. Schook, 1985–1987
Stephen R. Taylor, 1987–1989
Kenneth L. Hallenbeck, Jr., 1989–1991
Edward C. Rochette, 1991–1993
Kenneth Bressett, 1993–1995
David L. Ganz, 1995–1997
Anthony Swiatek, 1997–1999
H. Robert Campbell, 1999–2001
John Wilson, 2001–2003
Gary E. Lewis, 2003–2005
William Horton, 2005–2007
Barry Stuppler, 2007–2009
Clifford Mishler, 2009–2011
Tom Hallenbeck, 2011–2013
Walter Ostromecki, 2013–2015
Jeff Garrett, 2015–2017

Gary Adkins 2017-2019

29th April Donald Trump 100th day Rally Speech Video Highlights 2017 Venue TV telecast Live

29th April Donald Trump 100th day Rally Speech Video Highlights 2017

Donald Trump 100th day Rally Speech Video Highlights Text

"It's time for all of us to remember that we are one people with one great American destiny, and that whether we are black or brown or white, we all bleed the same red blood of patriots, and we all share the same glorious freedoms of our magnificent country,"

A large group of Hollywood actors and Washington media are consoling each other in a hotel ballroom in our nation's capital right now," Trump told the crowd. "They are gathered together for the White House Correspondents' dinner — without the President. And I could not possibly be more thrilled than to be more than 100 miles away from Washington's swamp, spending my evening with all of you and with a much, much larger crowd and much better people."  

We're going to give Americans the freedom to purchase the health care plans they want, not the health care forced on them by the government," Trump said. "And I'll be so angry at Congressman (Mike) Kelly and Congressman (Tom) Marino and all of our congressmen in this room if we don't get that damn thing passed quickly."


Hasan inhaj Washington Correspondents Dinner Hosting 2017

 

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