Spain general election 2019 Result Vote share Parliament

Spain general election 2019 Result Vote share Parliament

Spanish general Election​ 2019 Voting Results Candidates Live Details can be found here. The November 2019 Spanish general election will be held on Sunday, 10 November 2019, to elect the 14th Cortes Generales of the Kingdom of Spain. All 350 seats in the Congress of Deputies will be up for election, as well as 208 of 266 seats in the Senate.

The 2015 Spanish general election was held on Sunday, 20 December 2015, to elect the 11th Cortes Generales of the Kingdom of Spain. All 350 seats in the Congress of Deputies were up for election, as well as 208 of 266 seats in the Senate.

Spain general election 2019 Result Vote share Parliament

1Spain likely to return to the polls in November after-party talks fail.

2. Spanish King Asks Whether It’s Election Time Again for Sanchez.

3. Spanish General Election Candidates Clash over Catalonia.

  • The leader of ultra-right-wing party Vox – Santiago Abascal places his vote in Madrid.
  • Spanish voters are heading back to the polls on Sunday (10 November) for the fourth general election in less than four years

 

Party

Seats

Last

PSOE

120

123

PP

88

66

Vox

52

24

Podemos

35

42

Ciudadanos

10

57


Spain Important Political Information Updates

 


Spain April 2019 Results

Parties and coalitions
Seats Popular vote
  Total Votes
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) 123 7513142
People's Party (PP)1 66 4373653
Citizens–Party of the Citizenry (Cs)1 57 4155665
United We Can (Unidas Podemos) 42 3751145
United We Can (Podemos–IU–Equo)2 33 2897419
In Common We Can–Let's Win the Change (ECP–Guanyem el Canvi) 7 615665
In Common–United We Can (Podemos–EU–Tides in Common–Equo)3 2 238061
Vox (Vox) 24 2688092
Republican Left of Catalonia–Sovereigntists (ERC–Sobiranistes) 15 1024628
Republican Left of Catalonia–Sovereigntists (ERC–Sobiranistes) 15 1020392
Republican Left of the Valencian Country (ERPV) 0 4236
Together for Catalonia–Together (JxCat–Junts)4 7 500787
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) 6 395884
Animalist Party Against Mistreatment of Animals (PACMA) 0 328299
Basque Country Unite (EH Bildu) 4 259647
Commitment: Bloc–Initiative–Greens Equo (Compromís 2019) 1 173821
Canarian Coalition–Canarian Nationalist Party (CCa–PNC) 2 137664
Free People–We Are Alternative–Pirates: Republican Front (Front Republicà) 0 113807
Sum Navarre (NA+)5 2 107619
Galician Nationalist Bloc (BNG) 0 94433
Regionalist Party of Cantabria (PRC) 1 52266

 


Electoral system

The Spanish legislature, the Cortes Generales (Spanish for General Courts), was composed of two chambers at the time of the 2015 election:

  1.     The lower chamber, the Congress of Deputies.
  2.     The upper chamber, the Senate.

ALSO READ: Spain general election 2011 Result Vote share Parliament seat Opinion Exit Poll Schedule

Date Event
26-Oct-15 The Council of Ministers convenes to approve the decree ordering the Cortes Generales' dissolution and the calling of the general election on the advice of the Prime Minister. Subsequently, the decree is ratified by the King.
27-Oct-15 The decree enters into force by its publication in the BOE. Parliament is officially dissolved and the general election is called. Official start of the electoral period.
06-Nov-15 Deadline for parties intending to contest the election in coalition with other parties to communicate it to the appropriate electoral boards.
11–16 November 2015 Time limit for parties intending to contest the election to submit their candidacies to the Electoral Board.
18-Nov-15 Submitted candidacies are provisionally published in the BOE.
21-Nov-15 Deadline for Spanish electors residing abroad to apply for voting.
21–25 November 2015 Sweepstakes to appoint members of the polling stations.
24-Nov-15 Candidacies for parties, coalitions and groups of voters standing for election are proclaimed and published in the BOE after a period of notification and amendment of possible irregularities in 20–22 November 2015.
04-Dec-15 Official start of the electoral campaign at 00:00 CET (UTC+01:00).
10-Dec-15 Deadline for electors residing in Spain to apply for postal voting.
15–19 December 2015 Legal ban on opinion polling publication in Spanish territory.
18-Dec-15 Official end of the electoral campaign at 24:00 CET (UTC+01:00).
19-Dec-15 Reflection day.
20-Dec-15 Election Day. Polls open from 09:00 CET to 20:00 CET. Provisional vote count officially starting from 21:00 CET. From this day, the incumbent government assumes caretaker functions until a new government is formed.
13-Jan-16 The elected Congress and Senate convene.
 
From the Cortes' convening but without a defined term, the King calls for a round of talks with political parties' representatives so that, depending on each other parliamentary representation, nominate a candidate for Prime Minister, which is submitted to Congress for an investiture debate and subsequent vote.
The nominated candidate must muster an absolute majority of votes in the first ballot, or a relative majority in a second ballot to be held 48 hours after the first, in order to be elected. If within two months from the first investiture vote no candidate has obtained the confidence of Congress, the Cortes Generales are dissolved and a new general election called.
 

Opinion polls

7 December debate

Who do you believe has won the debate?

Polling firm/Link Sample
size
Soraya Sáenz de Santamaría Pedro Sánchez Pablo Iglesias Albert Rivera
       
Redondo & Asociados 600 30.7 16.4 23.9 22.0
CIS 6,242 18.3 8.9 31.3 12.0

14 December debate

Who do you believe has won the debate?

Polling firm/Link Sample
size
Mariano Rajoy Pedro Sánchez
   
Atresmedia   28.8 33.7
CIS 6,242 26.1 26.9

 Spanish general election Results 2015 

Party Popular vote Seats
Votes % ±pp Won +/−
People’s Party (PP) 72,36,965 28.71 –16.33 123 –64
Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party (PSOE) 55,45,315 22 –6.76 90 –20
  52,12,711 20.68 New 69
Citizens–Party of the Citizenry (C’s) 35,14,528 13.94 New 40 40
United Left–Popular Unity in Common (IU–UPeC) 9,26,783 3.68 –1.81 2 –6
Republican Left of Catalonia–Catalonia Yes (ERC–CatSí) 6,01,782 2.39 1.33 9 6
Democracy and Freedom: Convergence–Democrats–Realignment (DL) 5,67,253 2.25 –0.36 8 –2
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) 3,02,316 1.2 –0.13 6 1
Animalist Party Against Mistreatment of Animals (PACMA) 2,20,369 0.87 0.45 0 ±0
Basque Country Unite (EH Bildu) 2,19,125 0.87 –0.50 2 –5
Union, Progress and Democracy (UPyD) 1,55,153 0.62 –4.08 0 –5
Canarian Coalition–Canarian Nationalist Party (CC–PNC) 81,917 0.32 –0.27 1 –1
Us–Galician Candidacy (Nós) 70,863 0.28 –0.48 0 –2
Democratic Union of Catalonia (unio.cat)[d] 65,388 0.26 –1.30 0 –6
Vox (Vox) 58,114 0.23 New 0 ±0
Zero Cuts–Green Group (Recortes Cero–GV) 48,675 0.19 New 0 ±0
More for Majorca (Més) 33,877 0.13 ±0.00 0 ±0
Communist Party of the Peoples of Spain (PCPE) 31,179 0.12 0.01 0 ±0
Yes to the Future (GBai) 30,642 0.12 –0.05 0 –1
  1,00,226 0.4 0 ±0
Blank ballots 1,88,132 0.75 –0.62  
Total 2,52,11,313 100   350 ±0
Valid votes 2,52,11,313 99.11 0.4  
Invalid votes 2,27,219 0.89 –0.40
Votes cast / turnout 2,54,38,532 69.67 0.73
Abstentions 1,10,73,316 30.33 –0.73
Registered voters 3,65,11,848  

24-octtttttt 24-occcttttttttt-1

Vote share
Pary Votes
PP 28.71%
PSOE 22.00%
Podemos 20.68%
C's 13.94%
IU–UPeC 3.67%
ERC–CatSí 2.39%
DL 2.25%
EAJ/PNV 1.20%
EH Bildu 0.87%
CC–PNC 0.32%
Others 3.22%
Blank ballots 0.75%
Parliamentary seats
PP 35.14%
PSOE 25.71%
Podemos 19.71%
C's 11.43%
ERC–CatSí 2.57%
DL 2.29%
EAJ/PNV 1.71%
IU–UPeC 0.57%
EH Bildu 0.57%
CC–PNC 0.29%

Spanish general Election​ 2019 Voting Results Candidates Live

Spanish general Election​ 2019 Voting Results Candidates Live

Spanish general Election Dates 2019

Spanish general Election Date: 10 November 2019 

Spanish general Election​ 2019 Voting Results Candidates Live Details can be found here. The November 2019 Spanish general election will be held on Sunday, 10 November 2019, to elect the 14th Cortes Generales of the Kingdom of Spain. All 350 seats in the Congress of Deputies will be up for election, as well as 208 of 266 seats in the Senate.

The election will be held as provided under article 99.5 of the Spanish Constitution, as a result of the failure in government formation negotiations after Pedro Sánchez's failed investiture voting on 23–25 July 2019. On 17 September 2019, King Felipe VI declined to propose any candidate for investiture ahead of the 23 September deadline as a result of the lack of agreement between parties, with a new general election being scheduled for 10 November. The failure in PSOE–Unidas Podemos negotiations prompted former Podemos founder Íñigo Errejón to turn his regional Más Madrid platform—which had obtained a remarkable result in the 26 May Madrilenian regional election—into a national alliance under the newly-created brand of Más País, comprising a number of regional parties and former Podemos and United Left allies, such as Coalició Compromís, Equo or Chunta Aragonesista.


Spanish general Election Voting Live 2019

1Spain likely to return to the polls in November after-party talks fail.

2. Spanish King Asks Whether It’s Election Time Again for Sanchez.

3. Spanish General Election Candidates Clash over Catalonia.

  • Spanish voters are heading back to the polls on Sunday (10 November) for the fourth general election in less than four years

Spain Important Political Information Updates

 

  •  

The Electoral system of Spanish

The Spanish Cortes Generales is envisaged as an imperfect bicameral system. The Congress of Deputies has greater legislative power than the Senate, having the ability to vote confidence in or withdraw it from a Prime Minister and to override Senate vetoes by an absolute majority of votes. Nonetheless, the Senate possesses a few exclusive, yet limited in number functions—such as its role in the constitutional amendment—which are not subject to the Congress' override. Voting for the Cortes Generales is on the basis of universal suffrage, which comprises all nationals over eighteen and in full enjoyment of their political rights. Additionally, Spaniards abroad are required to apply for voting before being permitted to vote, a system known as "begged" or expat vote (Spanish: Voto Rogado).


Spanish Parties and leaders

 

Name of The Party Name of The Leader
PSOE Pedro Sánchez
PP Pablo Casado
Cs Albert Rivera
Unidas Podemos Pablo Iglesias
Vox Santiago Abascal
ERC–Sobiranistes Oriol Junqueras

Spanish election results 

 

Party

Seats

Last

PSOE

120

123

PP

88

66

Vox

52

24

Podemos

35

42

Ciudadanos

10

57

 

Catalonia Independence referendum 2017 Results Live Voting Exit Poll Candidates

Catalonia Independence referendum 2017 Results Live Voting Exit Poll Candidates

Catalan Independence referendum Dates 2017

National Status referendum Date: 1 October 2017

Catalonia Independence referendum 2017 Results Live Voting Exit Poll can be found below. The regional Government of Catalonia has set a referendum on Catalan independence for 1 October 2017. This referendum was first called for in June 2017 and was approved by the Catalan parliament in a session on 6 September 2017 along with a law which states that independence would be binding with a simple majority, without requiring a minimum turnout.

Opposition parties refused to participate in the session and have called on their voters to boycott the vote, except Catalunya Sí que es Pot who abstained but supports participation. The law is illegal according to the Catalan Statutes of autonomy which require a two third majority in the Catalan parliament for any change to Catalonia's status. 

 

The referendum itself is also illegal according to the Spanish constitution. It was suspended by the Constitutional Court on 7 September 2017, with the Catalan government stating the court order was not valid for Catalonia and proceeding to gather the support of 750 of 948 municipalities of Catalonia, including a partial support by Barcelona. This led to a constitutional crisis in Spain and started a police operation to stop the referendum.

 


Catalonia Independence referendum Results Live 2017

  1. The Results Show that nearly 90% of the people have voted for an independent nation.
  2. Also the voilence done by Spanish police by beating and other means has injured 761 people. This only makes the cause for independence stronger
  3. One of 17 autonomous regions in Spain, Catalonia is one of the wealthiest and includes the city of Barcelona. It already has its own language (Catalan), and some Catalans would like complete control — a state fully independent from Spain.
  4. But the Spanish government in Madrid argues such a vote is illegal on its face based on the 1978 Spanish Constitution, which calls for the “indissoluble unity of the Spanish Nation.”

 

Choice

 

 

Votes %
Yes 2020144 90.09
No 176565 7.87
Blank votes 45586 2.03
Total 2242295 100
Valid votes 2242295 99.11
Invalid votes 20129 0.89
Total voters 2262424 100
Registered voters / Turnout 5343358 42.34

Catalonia Independence referendum Voting Live 2017

  1. Electoral supervision – The Electoral Commission of Catalonia was responsible for overseeing the referendum.
  2. Question – The question of the referendum is "Do you want Catalonia to become an independent state in the form of a republic?".
  3. The Government of Spain opposes any Catalan self-determination referendum, because the Spanish Constitution does not allow for a vote on the independence of any Spanish region while also deeming it illegal without its consent. This interpretation is also favoured by the Catalan Statutory Guarantees Council. However, the Catalan government invokes the right to self-determination for calling the referendum.
  4. Following a constitutionality check demanded by the Spanish government, the Constitutional Court of Spain annulled the resolution emanated by the Parliament of Catalonia to hold such a vote.The Government of Catalonia, though, maintained that the vote would still be held on 1 October.

Eligibility to vote in Catalonia Independence referendum 2017

 

  1. The following people are, according to the Catalan government, entitled to vote in the referendum:
  2. Those who have the political condition of Catalan, are 18 years of age or older on the voting day, are not under any of the situations that legally deprive the right to vote and are on the electoral roll.
  3. Those Catalans currently residing abroad and who have their last residence in Catalonia, fulfil all the legal requirements, and have formally applied to take part in the voting process.

 

 

Spain Muslim Population Percentage 2017 By City Demographics Religion

Spain Muslim Population Percentage 2017 By City Demographics Religion

Islam was a widespread religion in what is now Spain and Portugal for nine centuries, beginning with the Umayyad conquest of Hispania and ending (at least overtly) with its prohibition by the modern Spanish state in the mid-16th century and the expulsion of the Moriscos in the early 17th century. Although a significant proportion of Moriscos returned to Spain or avoided expulsion through various means, and the decree never affected the country's large enslaved Muslim population, the indigenous practice of Islam is considered to have been effectively extinguished by the 19th century

As of 2016, Spain officially had 1,919,141 Muslims out of a total population of 46,438,422, or slightly above 4%, of the total population. Out of these, 1,115,124, or 58.7%, were immigrants without Spanish citizenship.

As of January 1, 2014, Spain had a total population of 46,507,760, which represents a 0.5% decrease since 2013. The CIA Factbook (2011) gives a racial description of "composite of Mediterranean and Nordic types" under "ethnic groups" instead of the usual breakdown of ethnic composition. This reflects the formation of the modern Kingdom of Spain by the accretion of several independent Iberian realms, i.e., León, Castile, Navarre, the Crown of Aragon, Granada, etc. Spain's population peaked in 2012, at 46,818,216 people. Spain's official population fell by 206,000 to 47.1 million, mostly because of immigrants returning home due to the effects of the European economic and fiscal crisis. Its population density, at 91.4 inhabitants per square kilometre (237/sq mi), is lower than that of most Western European countries. With the exception of the capital Madrid, the most densely populated areas lie around the coast.

The population of Spain doubled during the twentieth century as a result of the spectacular demographic boom in the 1960s and early 1970s. After that time, the birth rate plunged through the 1980s and Spain's population became stalled, its demographics showing one of the lowest sub replacement fertility rates in the world, only above Greece, Portugal, Hungary, Ukraine, and Japan.  

Many demographers have linked Spain's very low fertility rate to the country's lack of any real family planning policy. Spain spends the least on family support out all western European countries—0.5% of GDP. A graphic illustration of the enormous social gulf in this field is the fact that a Spanish family would need to have 57 children to enjoy the same financial support as a family with 3 children in Luxembourg.                                                                                                            

Spain Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017


Spanish Spain demographics Population by Religion 

Rank

Religion

% Of Population Affiliated To The Religion

1

Catholic Christians

70-75%

2

Atheists Or Non-Believers

20-22%

3

Islam

4%


Spanish Muslim Population by Year.

 

Population by year

 

 
Year Muslim population (x 1000) Total population (x 1000) % of total population
2007 1 000 44 784 2.23
2012 1 671 46 818 3.57
2013 1 732 46 728 3.71
2014 1 858 46 508 4
2015 1 887 46 449 4.06
2016 1 919    

Spanish Spain demographics Population by Immigrants 

Immigrant Population divided by Region

Origin

2014

2011

2007

2006

2001

Growth 2001–2011

% Change

European Union Romania

730,340

798,104

527,019

407,159

31,641

766,463

2522%

 Morocco

714,221

769,920

582,923

563,012

233,415

536,505

230%

European Union United Kingdom

311,774

390,880

314,951

274,722

107,326

283,554

264%

 Ecuador

212,970

359,076

427,099

461,310

139,022

220,054

158%

European Union Italy

182,249

187,847

135,108

115,791

34,689

153,158

441%

 Colombia

172,368

271,773

261,542

265,141

87,209

184,564

212%

 China

164,555

166,223

106,652

104,681

27,574

138,649

503%

European Union Germany

149,522

195,842

164,405

150,490

99,217

96,625

97%

European Union Bulgaria

140,206

172,634

122,057

101,617

12,035

160,599

1334%

 Bolivia

126,421

197,895

200,496

139,802

6,619

191,276

2890%

European Union Portugal

109,568

140,706

100,616

80,635

47,064

93,642

199%

European Union France

100,448

122,385

100,408

90,021

51,582

70,803

137%

 Peru

83,583

131,886

103,650

95,903

34,975

96,911

277%

 Ukraine

81,625

85,913

69,983

69,893

10,318

75,595

733%

 Argentina

80,910

120,012

141,159

150,252

32,429

87,583

270%

 Dominican Republic

77,280

90,612

65,119

61,071

31,153

59,459

191%

European Union Poland

70,606

85,862

61,464

45,797

13,469

72,393

537%

 Brazil

63,365

106,908

90,161

72,441

17,078

89,830

526%

 Russia

62,452

52,832

39,798

39,904

10,047

42,785

426%

 Algeria

56,282

60,538

45,813

47,079

18,265

42,273

231%

 Paraguay

55,524

87,406

46,238

28,587

928

86,478

9319%

 Pakistan

55,452

69,841

42,105

42,138

8,274

61,567

744%

 Senegal

51,046

63,248

36,955

35,079

10,627

52,621

495%

 Cuba

49,992

54,406

45,698

44,739

24,534

29,872

122%

European Union Netherlands

46,914

54,424

44,398

39,484

23,146

31,278

135%

 Venezuela

44,290

59,453

51,481

51,261

16,549

42,904

259%

 Nigeria

38,546

44,870

32,119

31,588

7,598

37,272

490%

European Union Belgium

31,128

35,876

31,412

29,526

19,869

16,007

80%

 Philippines

30,079

54,385

51,368

3,017

 Uruguay

28,437

42,581

46,069

45,508

6,828

35,753

524%

 Chile

27,064

41,712

40,844

39,704

11,674

30,038

257%

 Mexico

22,486

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

4,676,022

5,730,667

4,519,554

4,144,166

1,370,657

4,360,010

318%

 


Spanish Spain demographics Population by Race

2012 Population by Race and Ethnicity

Spanish Fort, AL

Alabama

United States

Population by Race

White Population

85.65%

68.15%

71.71%

Black or African American Population

9.60%

26.30%

12.86%

American Indian and Alaska Native Population

0.72%

0.62%

0.96%

Asian Population

1.72%

1.23%

5.30%

Multi-racial Population

1.57%

1.56%

3.13%

Other Population

0.74%

2.14%

6.05%

Population by Ethnicity

Population Hispanic

2.18%

4.18%

16.91%

Population Non Hispanic

97.82%

95.82%

83.09%

 


Spanish Population by City  

S.No.

Name

Adm.

Population

Estimate (E)

01/01/2016

1

Madrid

MAD

3,165,541

2

Barcelona

CAT

1,608,746

3

Valencia

VAL

790,201

4

Sevilla

AND

690,566

5

Zaragoza

ARA

661,108

6

Málaga

AND

569,009

7

Murcia

MUR

441,003

8

Palma de Mallorca

BAL

402,949

9

Las Palmas de Gran Canaria

CAN

378,998

10

Bilbao

PAI

345,122

 

 

 

Spain Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 by City Immigrants

Spain Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017

As of January 1, 2014, Spain had a total population of 46,507,760, which represents a 0.5% decrease since 2013. The CIA Factbook (2011) gives a racial description of "composite of Mediterranean and Nordic types" under "ethnic groups" instead of the usual breakdown of ethnic composition. This reflects the formation of the modern Kingdom of Spain by the accretion of several independent Iberian realms, i.e., León, Castile, Navarre, the Crown of Aragon, Granada, etc. Spain's population peaked in 2012, at 46,818,216 people. Spain's official population fell by 206,000 to 47.1 million, mostly because of immigrants returning home due to the effects of the European economic and fiscal crisis. Its population density, at 91.4 inhabitants per square kilometre (237/sq mi), is lower than that of most Western European countries. With the exception of the capital Madrid, the most densely populated areas lie around the coast.

The population of Spain doubled during the twentieth century as a result of the spectacular demographic boom in the 1960s and early 1970s. After that time, the birth rate plunged through the 1980s and Spain's population became stalled, its demographics showing one of the lowest sub replacement fertility rates in the world, only above Greece, Portugal, Hungary, Ukraine, and Japan.  

Many demographers have linked Spain's very low fertility rate to the country's lack of any real family planning policy. Spain spends the least on family support out all western European countries—0.5% of GDP. A graphic illustration of the enormous social gulf in this field is the fact that a Spanish family would need to have 57 children to enjoy the same financial support as a family with 3 children in Luxembourg.                                                                                                            

Spain Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017


Spanish Spain demographics Population by Religion 

Rank

Religion

% Of Population Affiliated To The Religion

1

Catholic Christians

70-75%

2

Atheists Or Non-Believers

20-22%

3

Other Faiths (Islam, Protestant Christianity and Buddhism etc.)

3-5%

 


Spanish Spain demographics Population by Immigrants 

Immigrant Population divided by Region

Origin

2014

2011

2007

2006

2001

Growth 2001–2011

% Change

European Union Romania

730,340

798,104

527,019

407,159

31,641

766,463

2522%

 Morocco

714,221

769,920

582,923

563,012

233,415

536,505

230%

European Union United Kingdom

311,774

390,880

314,951

274,722

107,326

283,554

264%

 Ecuador

212,970

359,076

427,099

461,310

139,022

220,054

158%

European Union Italy

182,249

187,847

135,108

115,791

34,689

153,158

441%

 Colombia

172,368

271,773

261,542

265,141

87,209

184,564

212%

 China

164,555

166,223

106,652

104,681

27,574

138,649

503%

European Union Germany

149,522

195,842

164,405

150,490

99,217

96,625

97%

European Union Bulgaria

140,206

172,634

122,057

101,617

12,035

160,599

1334%

 Bolivia

126,421

197,895

200,496

139,802

6,619

191,276

2890%

European Union Portugal

109,568

140,706

100,616

80,635

47,064

93,642

199%

European Union France

100,448

122,385

100,408

90,021

51,582

70,803

137%

 Peru

83,583

131,886

103,650

95,903

34,975

96,911

277%

 Ukraine

81,625

85,913

69,983

69,893

10,318

75,595

733%

 Argentina

80,910

120,012

141,159

150,252

32,429

87,583

270%

 Dominican Republic

77,280

90,612

65,119

61,071

31,153

59,459

191%

European Union Poland

70,606

85,862

61,464

45,797

13,469

72,393

537%

 Brazil

63,365

106,908

90,161

72,441

17,078

89,830

526%

 Russia

62,452

52,832

39,798

39,904

10,047

42,785

426%

 Algeria

56,282

60,538

45,813

47,079

18,265

42,273

231%

 Paraguay

55,524

87,406

46,238

28,587

928

86,478

9319%

 Pakistan

55,452

69,841

42,105

42,138

8,274

61,567

744%

 Senegal

51,046

63,248

36,955

35,079

10,627

52,621

495%

 Cuba

49,992

54,406

45,698

44,739

24,534

29,872

122%

European Union Netherlands

46,914

54,424

44,398

39,484

23,146

31,278

135%

 Venezuela

44,290

59,453

51,481

51,261

16,549

42,904

259%

 Nigeria

38,546

44,870

32,119

31,588

7,598

37,272

490%

European Union Belgium

31,128

35,876

31,412

29,526

19,869

16,007

80%

 Philippines

30,079

54,385

51,368

3,017

 Uruguay

28,437

42,581

46,069

45,508

6,828

35,753

524%

 Chile

27,064

41,712

40,844

39,704

11,674

30,038

257%

 Mexico

22,486

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

4,676,022

5,730,667

4,519,554

4,144,166

1,370,657

4,360,010

318%

 


Spanish Spain demographics Population by Race

2012 Population by Race and Ethnicity

Spanish Fort, AL

Alabama

United States

Population by Race

White Population

85.65%

68.15%

71.71%

Black or African American Population

9.60%

26.30%

12.86%

American Indian and Alaska Native Population

0.72%

0.62%

0.96%

Asian Population

1.72%

1.23%

5.30%

Multi-racial Population

1.57%

1.56%

3.13%

Other Population

0.74%

2.14%

6.05%

Population by Ethnicity

Population Hispanic

2.18%

4.18%

16.91%

Population Non Hispanic

97.82%

95.82%

83.09%

 


Spanish Population by City  

S.No.

Name

Adm.

Population

Estimate (E)

01/01/2016

1

Madrid

MAD

3,165,541

2

Barcelona

CAT

1,608,746

3

Valencia

VAL

790,201

4

Sevilla

AND

690,566

5

Zaragoza

ARA

661,108

6

Málaga

AND

569,009

7

Murcia

MUR

441,003

8

Palma de Mallorca

BAL

402,949

9

Las Palmas de Gran Canaria

CAN

378,998

10

Bilbao

PAI

345,122

 

 

 

Opinion Poll says Iceland’s Pirate Party will win, Iceland’s national elections 2016 latest Opinion Exit poll, Pirate Party, Independence Party, Birgitta Jónsdóttir

Opinion Poll says Iceland’s Pirate Party will win, Iceland’s national elections 2016 latest Opinion Exit poll, Pirate Party, Independence Party, Birgitta Jónsdóttir

Iceland’s national elections take place on Saturday, and at present, a radical fringe party could be heading for the win.

One in five Icelanders favor the Pirate Party, according to an online opinion poll run by the Social Science Research Institute at the University of Iceland, the Iceland Monitor reports.

That figure puts the party in first place with 22.6 percent of the votes – 1.5 percent ahead of the center-right Independence Party, which is currently in power. Those numbers would give each of the two parties 15 MPs in the 63-seat parliament.

 

Iceland’s Pirate Party is part of a global political movement that first began in Sweden in 2006 to bring about digital-copyright reform. According to the Post, the party’s political leanings are neither right nor left and policy is vague, focusing on direct democracy, civil rights, transparency and public access to information.

In 2013, three members of Iceland’s Pirate Party were elected to parliament — making Iceland the only country in the world to have members of the Pirate movement in government.

Spain general election 2015 Result Vote share Parliament seat Opinion Exit Poll Schedule, Spain Latest Opinion Poll, Spanish general election Result 2015, 2015 Spanish Congress of Deputies Senate election results

Spain general election 2015 Result Vote share Parliament seat Opinion Exit Poll Schedule, Spain Latest Opinion Poll, Spanish general election Result 2015, 2015 Spanish Congress of Deputies Senate election results

The 2015 Spanish general election was held on Sunday, 20 December 2015, to elect the 11th Cortes Generales of the Kingdom of Spain. All 350 seats in the Congress of Deputies were up for election, as well as 208 of 266 seats in the Senate.

Electoral system

The Spanish legislature, the Cortes Generales (Spanish for General Courts), was composed of two chambers at the time of the 2015 election:

  1.     The lower chamber, the Congress of Deputies.
  2.     The upper chamber, the Senate.

ALSO READ: Spain general election 2011 Result Vote share Parliament seat Opinion Exit Poll Schedule

Date Event
26-Oct-15 The Council of Ministers convenes to approve the decree ordering the Cortes Generales' dissolution and the calling of the general election on the advice of the Prime Minister. Subsequently, the decree is ratified by the King.
27-Oct-15 The decree enters into force by its publication in the BOE. Parliament is officially dissolved and the general election is called. Official start of the electoral period.
06-Nov-15 Deadline for parties intending to contest the election in coalition with other parties to communicate it to the appropriate electoral boards.
11–16 November 2015 Time limit for parties intending to contest the election to submit their candidacies to the Electoral Board.
18-Nov-15 Submitted candidacies are provisionally published in the BOE.
21-Nov-15 Deadline for Spanish electors residing abroad to apply for voting.
21–25 November 2015 Sweepstakes to appoint members of the polling stations.
24-Nov-15 Candidacies for parties, coalitions and groups of voters standing for election are proclaimed and published in the BOE after a period of notification and amendment of possible irregularities in 20–22 November 2015.
04-Dec-15 Official start of the electoral campaign at 00:00 CET (UTC+01:00).
10-Dec-15 Deadline for electors residing in Spain to apply for postal voting.
15–19 December 2015 Legal ban on opinion polling publication in Spanish territory.
18-Dec-15 Official end of the electoral campaign at 24:00 CET (UTC+01:00).
19-Dec-15 Reflection day.
20-Dec-15 Election Day. Polls open from 09:00 CET to 20:00 CET. Provisional vote count officially starting from 21:00 CET. From this day, the incumbent government assumes caretaker functions until a new government is formed.
13-Jan-16 The elected Congress and Senate convene.
 
From the Cortes' convening but without a defined term, the King calls for a round of talks with political parties' representatives so that, depending on each other parliamentary representation, nominate a candidate for Prime Minister, which is submitted to Congress for an investiture debate and subsequent vote.
The nominated candidate must muster an absolute majority of votes in the first ballot, or a relative majority in a second ballot to be held 48 hours after the first, in order to be elected. If within two months from the first investiture vote no candidate has obtained the confidence of Congress, the Cortes Generales are dissolved and a new general election called.
 

Opinion polls

7 December debate

Who do you believe has won the debate?

Polling firm/Link Sample
size
Soraya Sáenz de Santamaría Pedro Sánchez Pablo Iglesias Albert Rivera
       
Redondo & Asociados 600 30.7 16.4 23.9 22.0
CIS 6,242 18.3 8.9 31.3 12.0

14 December debate

Who do you believe has won the debate?

Polling firm/Link Sample
size
Mariano Rajoy Pedro Sánchez
   
Atresmedia   28.8 33.7
CIS 6,242 26.1 26.9

 Spanish general election Results 2015 

Party Popular vote Seats
Votes % ±pp Won +/−
People’s Party (PP) 72,36,965 28.71 –16.33 123 –64
Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party (PSOE) 55,45,315 22 –6.76 90 –20
  52,12,711 20.68 New 69
Citizens–Party of the Citizenry (C’s) 35,14,528 13.94 New 40 40
United Left–Popular Unity in Common (IU–UPeC) 9,26,783 3.68 –1.81 2 –6
Republican Left of Catalonia–Catalonia Yes (ERC–CatSí) 6,01,782 2.39 1.33 9 6
Democracy and Freedom: Convergence–Democrats–Realignment (DL) 5,67,253 2.25 –0.36 8 –2
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) 3,02,316 1.2 –0.13 6 1
Animalist Party Against Mistreatment of Animals (PACMA) 2,20,369 0.87 0.45 0 ±0
Basque Country Unite (EH Bildu) 2,19,125 0.87 –0.50 2 –5
Union, Progress and Democracy (UPyD) 1,55,153 0.62 –4.08 0 –5
Canarian Coalition–Canarian Nationalist Party (CC–PNC) 81,917 0.32 –0.27 1 –1
Us–Galician Candidacy (Nós) 70,863 0.28 –0.48 0 –2
Democratic Union of Catalonia (unio.cat)[d] 65,388 0.26 –1.30 0 –6
Vox (Vox) 58,114 0.23 New 0 ±0
Zero Cuts–Green Group (Recortes Cero–GV) 48,675 0.19 New 0 ±0
More for Majorca (Més) 33,877 0.13 ±0.00 0 ±0
Communist Party of the Peoples of Spain (PCPE) 31,179 0.12 0.01 0 ±0
Yes to the Future (GBai) 30,642 0.12 –0.05 0 –1
  1,00,226 0.4 0 ±0
Blank ballots 1,88,132 0.75 –0.62  
Total 2,52,11,313 100   350 ±0
Valid votes 2,52,11,313 99.11 0.4  
Invalid votes 2,27,219 0.89 –0.40
Votes cast / turnout 2,54,38,532 69.67 0.73
Abstentions 1,10,73,316 30.33 –0.73
Registered voters 3,65,11,848  

24-octtttttt 24-occcttttttttt-1

Vote share
Pary Votes
PP 28.71%
PSOE 22.00%
Podemos 20.68%
C's 13.94%
IU–UPeC 3.67%
ERC–CatSí 2.39%
DL 2.25%
EAJ/PNV 1.20%
EH Bildu 0.87%
CC–PNC 0.32%
Others 3.22%
Blank ballots 0.75%
Parliamentary seats
PP 35.14%
PSOE 25.71%
Podemos 19.71%
C's 11.43%
ERC–CatSí 2.57%
DL 2.29%
EAJ/PNV 1.71%
IU–UPeC 0.57%
EH Bildu 0.57%
CC–PNC 0.29%

Spain general election 2011 Result Vote share Parliament seat Opinion Exit Poll Schedule Manifesto Slogans,Spain Latest Opinion Poll, Spanish general election Result 2011, 2011 Spanish Congress of Deputies Senate election results

Spain general election 2011 Result Vote share Parliament seat Opinion Exit Poll Schedule Manifesto Slogans,Spain Latest Opinion Poll, Spanish general election Result 2011, 2011 Spanish Congress of Deputies Senate election results

The 2011 Spanish general election was held on Sunday, 20 November 2011, to elect the 10th Cortes Generales of the Kingdom of Spain. All 350 seats in the Congress of Deputies were up for election, as well as 208 of 266 seats in the Senate.

ALSO READ: Spain general election 2015 Result Vote share Parliament seat Opinion Exit Poll Schedule

Spain 2011 Election Date:

Date Event
26-Sep-11 The Council of Ministers convenes to approve the decree ordering the Cortes Generales' dissolution and the calling of the general election on the advice of the Prime Minister. Subsequently, the decree is ratified by the King.
27-Sep-11 The decree enters into force by its publication in the BOE. Parliament is officially dissolved and the general election is called. Official start of the electoral period.
07-Oct-11 Deadline for parties intending to contest the election in coalition with other parties to communicate it to the appropriate electoral boards.
12–17 October 2011 Time limit for parties intending to contest the election to submit their candidacies to the Electoral Board.
19-Oct-11 Submitted candidacies are provisionally published in the BOE.
22-Oct-11 Deadline for Spanish electors residing abroad to apply for voting.
22–26 October 2011 Sweepstakes to appoint members of the polling stations.
25-Oct-11 Candidacies for parties, coalitions and groups of voters standing for election are proclaimed and published in the BOE after a period of notification and amendment of possible irregularities in 20–22 November 2015.
04-Nov-11 Official start of the electoral campaign at 00:00 CET (UTC+01:00).
10-Nov-11 Deadline for electors residing in Spain to apply for postal voting.
15–19 Novembe 2011 Legal ban on opinion polling publication in Spanish territory.
18-Nov-11 Official end of the electoral campaign at 24:00 CET (UTC+01:00).
19-Nov-11 Reflection day.
20-Nov-11 Election Day. Polls open from 09:00 CET to 20:00 CET. Provisional vote count officially starting from 21:00 CET. From this day, the incumbent government assumes caretaker functions until a new government is formed.
13-Dec-11 The elected Congress and Senate convene.
 
From the Cortes' convening but without a defined term, the King calls for a round of talks with political parties' representatives so that, depending on each other parliamentary representation, nominate a candidate for Prime Minister, which is submitted to Congress for an investiture debate and subsequent vote.
The nominated candidate must muster an absolute majority of votes in the first ballot, or a relative majority in a second ballot to be held 48 hours after the first, in order to be elected. If within two months from the first investiture vote no candidate has obtained the confidence of Congress, the Cortes Generales are dissolved and a new general election called.
 

Party manifestos and slogans

Party/alliance Manifesto (external link) Campaign slogan(s)
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) An Electoral Manifesto to Win the Future "Fight for what you want".
People's Party (PP) What Spain Needs "Join the change"
United Left (IU) Electoral Proposals "Rebel!"
Union, Progress and Democracy (UPyD) My Vote Counts "Each vote counts"
Convergence and Union (CiU) CiU Electoral Manifesto "More for Catalonia"
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) Working for the Basque Country in Madrid "For the Basque Country" & "The Basque Country cans"
Amaiur (Amaiur) Amaiur Commitments "Bridging"
Republican Left of Catalonia (ERC) The Republic of Yes "We Want the Republic of Yes

Opinion polling for the Spanish general election 2011

Polling firm/Link Last date
of polling
 PSOE  PP  IU CIU  PNV  UPYD  ERC Margin
of error
Sample
size
Lead
             
 
General Election Nov 20, 2011 28.8 44.6 6.9 4.2 1.3 4.7 1.1     15.8
 
TNS Demoscopia Nov 20, 2011 30.0 43.5 6.7 3.4 1.2 4.3 1.1   190,000 13.5
NC Report Nov 20, 2011 31.3 45.0 7.8 3.3 1.2 2.4 0.7   771 13.7
Sigma Dos Nov 16, 2011 28.5 48.0 6.7 3.1   3.8       19.5
Ipsos Nov 13, 2011 31.8 44.5 6.1 3.4 1.0 4.1 1.0     12.7

 Results of the Spanish general election, 2011 

Party Popular vote Seats
Votes  % ±pp Won +/−
People's Party (PP) 1,08,66,566 44.63 4.52 186 32
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) 70,03,511 28.76 –15.11 110 –59
United Left–The Greens: Plural Left (IU–LV) 16,86,040 6.92 3 11 9
Union, Progress and Democracy (UPyD) 11,43,225 4.7 3.51 5 4
Convergence and Union (CiU) 10,15,691 4.17 1.14 16 6
Amaiur (Amaiur) 3,34,498 1.37 1.05 7 7
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) 3,24,317 1.33 0.14 5 –1
Republican Left (Esquerra) 2,56,985 1.06 –0.10 3 ±0
Equo (eQuo) 2,16,748 0.89 New 0 ±0
Galician Nationalist Bloc (BNG) 1,84,037 0.76 –0.07 2 ±0
Canarian Coalition–New Canaries–Canarian Nationalist Party (CC–NC–PNC) 1,43,881 0.59 –0.24 2 ±0
Commitment Coalition–Equo (Compromís–Q) 1,25,306 0.51 0.39 1 1
Animalist Party Against Mistreatment of Animals (PACMA) 1,02,144 0.42 0.25 0 ±0
Asturias Forum (FAC) 99,473 0.41 New 1 1
Blank Seats (EB) 97,673 0.4 0.38 0 ±0
Andalusian Party (PA) 76,999 0.32 0.05 0 ±0
Platform for Catalonia (PxC) 59,949 0.25 0.24 0 ±0
Regionalist Party of Cantabria (PRC) 44,010 0.18 New 0 ±0
Yes to the Future (GBai) 42,415 0.17 –0.07 1 ±0
For a Fairer World (PUM+J) 27,210 0.11 0.02 0 ±0
Communist Party of the Peoples of Spain (PCPE) 26,254 0.11 0.03 0 ±0
  1,38,493 0.57 0 ±0
Blank ballots 3,33,461 1.37 0.26  
Total 2,43,48,886 100   350 ±0
Valid votes 2,43,48,886 98.71 –0.65  
Invalid votes 3,17,555 1.29 0.65
Votes cast / turnout 2,46,66,441 68.94 –4.91
Abstentions 1,11,13,050 31.06 4.91
Registered voters 3,57,79,491  
Source: Ministry of the Interior

GNKFHG

Vote share
PP 44.63%
PSOE 28.76%
IU–LV 6.92%
UPyD 4.70%
CiU 4.17%
Amaiur 1.37%
EAJ/PNV 1.33%
Esquerra 1.06%
BNG 0.76%
CC–NC–PNC 0.59%
Compromís–Q 0.51%
FAC 0.41%
GBai 0.17%
Others 3.24%
Blank ballots 1.37%

24-oct 

 

Parliamentary seats
PP 53.14%
PSOE 31.43%
CiU 4.57%
IU–LV 3.14%
Amaiur 2.00%
UPyD 1.43%
EAJ/PNV 1.43%
Esquerra 0.86%
BNG 0.57%
CC–NC–PNC 0.57%
Compromís–Q 0.29%
FAC 0.29%
GBai 0.29%

Spanish Socialist party faces turmoil as rebels avoid third election, Spanish third national election 2016,Pedro Sanchez , conservative People Party, Mariano Rajoy

Spanish Socialist party faces turmoil as rebels avoid third election, Spanish third national election 2016,Pedro Sanchez , conservative People Party, Mariano Rajoy 

Spain’s political deadlock has taken its most dramatic turn in nine months as the main opposition Socialist party’s leadership has torn itself in two, with members resigning en masse to try to unseat their leader and avoid a third unwinnable election.

A stand-off between the Socialists, headed by Pedro Sanchez, and the conservative People’s Party (PP) – which won the most votes but fell short of a majority in two inconclusive elections – has frustrated repeated attempts to form a government.


With the clock counting down to a possible third national election in December, the Socialist rebels hope they can oust Sanchez and seek ways to break the deadlock, including a potential abstention in a confidence vote to let acting Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy stay in power.

On Wednesday, the 17 rebels resigned from the Socialist’s 38-strong executive committee, which was already down three members, and called for Sanchez, who oversaw the party’s worst election result in June, to stand down.

In a confidence vote in August, Sanchez refused to allow a minority government led by Rajoy, whose party he chastises as corrupt and committed to austerity.

Since his election in 2011, Mr. Rajoy has presided over Spain’s recovery from a punishing recession but lost support among voters stung by austerity measures and angry over corruption scandals.

With his party holding 137 of the current parliament’s 350 seats, Mr. Rajoy would have a shot at winning a new term next month if at least some of the Socialists, the second-largest bloc with 85 seats, abstained rather than voting against him, as they did this month.

Spain may faces third general election as Rajoy loses confidence vote, Mariano Rajoy, Rajoy loses confidence Vote, Spain Re-election schedule 2016 in December, Spain general election schedule/dates/timeline 2016

Spain may faces third general election as Rajoy loses confidence vote, Mariano Rajoy, Rajoy loses confidence Vote, Spain Re-election schedule 2016 in December, Spain general election schedule/dates/timeline 2016

Spain faces a third general election after acting Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy failed to gain enough support on Wednesday in the investiture.

  1. The People's Party (PP) leader Rajoy obtained 170 votes in favor and 180 against after 11 hours of debate at the Spanish Congress of Deputies. He needed an absolute majority in this first attempt, the support of 176 members of the Congress of Deputies.
  2. Rajoy had the support of centre-right party Ciudadanos (32 seats) and regional party Coalicion Canaria (one seat) while on the other hand, another six political parties voted against, including the main opposition party, Spain's Socialist Party (PSOE), whose leader Pedro Sanchez had already announced his opposition to a government led by Rajoy.
  3. Left wing Unidos Podemos (71 seats) and regional parties ERC (nine seats), PDC (eight seats), PNV (five seats), EH Bildu (two seats) voted against.

Members of the Congress of Deputies will meet again on Friday in order to vote again when Rajoy would need absolute majority or the abstention of 11 deputies. If he has not got enough support, Spanish King Felipe VI could start another round of meetings in order to choose another candidate.

If it is impossible to form government, Spain would hold general election for the third time in a row which is scheduled for Dec. 25.

If there is no breakthrough, voters will be asked to return to the polls on December 25, the date determined by timings laid out in Spanish election law.


Socialists and other parties have already proposed shortening the campaign so a repeat election can be held on December 18.

The 61-year-old candidate is trying to piece together the first administration since Spain’s traditional two-party system broke down with the emergence of Ciudadanos and Podemos at last December’s election. While the PP was the only group to increase its vote at a re-run in June, and has considerable common ground with the Socialists on policy, Rajoy is struggling to clinch enough support because of unresolved corruption allegations against his party.

“A third election would be very bad news for all Spaniards,” acting Deputy Prime Minister Soraya Saenz de Santamaria told reporters after the vote. “I hope we can all look in the mirror in the coming days and think about our responsibilities.”

 

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