Podemos (We Can) Party seen losing support ahead of Spain election, Spain General election June 2016,Spain Repeat election June 2016,Spain June Election Survey

Podemos (We Can) Party seen losing support ahead of Spain election, Spain General election June 2016,Spain Repeat election June 2016,Spain June Election Survey

Anti-austerity party of Spain’s, Podemos, is losing support ahead of country’s repeat general election to be held on June 26, an official survey showed here on Friday, although the vote would remain highly divided and would result in a hung parliament.

According to the poll, the voters would not go back to the two-party system that has dominated Spain’s political history for 40 years and would split their vote between 10 parties, even after the five months talk between political parties after a December election resulted in a failure to form government.

The poll predicted that Podemos would get 17.7% of votes against 20.6% they got in December election, while the conservative People’s Party of the acting Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy would win the voting with 27.4% which is down from 28.7% they got during December election. The Socialists would end second with 21.6% of the votes, down from 22.01%, and Liberal Ciudadonas would end at fourth place with 15.6% which is an up from 13.93% they secured in December.

This means that at least three parties, or may be more, would be required to reach an absolute majority in the Spanish parliament and form a stable government.

But there are several factors that could change the situation and help break the deadlock, the poll result showed.

During the December election Spain saw its highest Abstinence rate till date on record which is likely to increase further. The poll records 27.4% of the voters saying they are undecided or are likely to home compared to 24.5% of the voters in the previous survey that was done in January.

Currently a potential tie-up between Podemos and former Communist United left is under discussion that would jointly obtain 23.1% of the votes and thus becoming the main left-wing force ahead of the Socialists.

The survey was carried out on 2,500 voters in early April that is before it was clear whether a new election would be called or not.

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