Gibraltar general Election 2019 Voting Live

Gibraltar general Election 2019 Voting Live

Gibraltar general Election Dates 2019

Gibraltar general Election Date: 13 October 2019 

The Gibraltar general election of 2019 to elect all 17 members to the 4th Gibraltar Parliament is scheduled to take place on Thursday 17 October 2019. Chief Minister Fabian Picardo announced the date of the election on Monday 16 September 2019.


Gibraltar general Election Voting Live 2019 

1. BREAKING: SURPRISE GIBRALTAR ELECTIONS CALLED FOR OCTOBER 17 BY CHIEF MINISTER FABIAN PICARDO.

2. Gibraltar election CALLED: Parliament dissolved – 'Need strong leadership for Brexit'.

3. GSLP reveals its Election Manifesto ahead of Gibraltar elections.


The Electoral system of Gibraltar 

Under section 38(2) of the Gibraltar Constitution Order 2006, the parliament must be dissolved by the Governor four years after its first meeting following the last election (unless the Chief Minister advises the Governor to dissolve parliament sooner). Under section 37 of the Constitution, writs for a general election must be issued within thirty days of the dissolution and the general election must then be held no later than three months after the issuing of a writ. In October 2015, Chief Minister Fabian Picardo announced that the election would take place on 26 November. Following the British tradition, elections in Gibraltar conventionally take place on a Thursday.


Gibraltar general Parties and leaders

 

N/A


Gibraltar past election results 

Party Votes % +/– Seats % +/–
Alliance Gibraltar Socialist Labour Party 70,551 47.8 +13.6 7 41.2 ±0
Liberal Party of Gibraltar 30,399 20.6 +6.0 3 17.6 ±0
Total Alliance 100,950 68.4 +19.6 10 58.8 ±0
Gibraltar Social Democrats 46,545 31.6 -15.2 7 41.2 ±0
Total 147,495 100 17 100
 
Valid votes 15,578 94.6
Invalid/blank votes 897 5.4
Total votes cast 16,475 100
Registered voters/turnout 23,278 70.8

United kingdom referendum election 2017 voting live

United Kingdom referendum election 2017 Results Voting Live

United Kingdom referendum election Dates 2017

United Kingdom referendum election Date: 31 December 2017

The United Kingdom European Union membership referendum, also known as the EU referendum and the Brexit referendum, took place on 23 June 2016 in the United Kingdom (UK) and Gibraltar to gauge support for the country either remaining a member of or leaving, the European Union (EU). The referendum resulted in 51.9% of voters voting in favour of leaving the EU. The government initiated the official EU withdrawal process on 29 March 2017, which put the UK on course to complete the withdrawal process by 30 March 2019.

Membership of the EU and its predecessors has long been a topic of debate in the United Kingdom. The country joined what were then the three European Communities, principally the European Economic Community (EEC, or "Common Market"), in 1973. A first referendum on continued membership of the then European Communities (Common Market) was held in 1975, and it was approved by 67.2% of "Yes" voters compared to 32.8% of "No" voters.

In May 2015, in accordance with a Conservative Party manifesto commitment following that party's surprise victory in the 2015 UK general election, the legal basis for a referendum on EU membership was established by the UK Parliament through the European Union Referendum Act 2015. Britain Stronger in Europe was the official group campaigning for the UK to remain in the EU and was endorsed by the

Prime Minister David Cameron and Chancellor George Osborne. Vote Leave was the official group campaigning for the UK to leave the EU and was fronted by the Conservative MP Boris Johnson, Secretary of State for Justice Michael Gove and Labour MP Gisela Stuart. Other campaign groups, political parties, businesses, trade unions, newspapers and prominent individuals were also involved, and each side had supporters from across the political spectrum.


United Kingdom referendum election Voting Live 2017

  1. The European Communities were formed in the 1950s—the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) in 1952, and the European Atomic Energy Community (EAEC or Euratom) and European Economic Community (EEC) in 1957.[1] The EEC, much the largest of the three, came to be known as the "Common Market". The UK first applied to join them in 1961, but this was vetoed by France.
  2. A later application was successful, and the UK joined in 1973; two years later, a referendum on continuing membership resulted in 67.2% approval. Political integration gained greater focus when the Maastricht Treaty established the European Union (EU) in 1993, which incorporated (and after the Treaty of Lisbon, succeeded) the European Communities.
  3. Before the 2010 general election, David Cameron had given a "cast iron" promise of a referendum on the Lisbon Treaty, which he backtracked on after all EU countries had ratified the Treaty before the election.

Electoral system of United Kingdom

The right to vote in the referendum in the United Kingdom is defined by the legislation as limited to residents of the United Kingdom who were either also Commonwealth citizens under the British Nationality Act 1948 (which include British citizens

and other British nationals), or those who were also citizens of the Republic of Ireland, or both. Members of the House of Lords were able to vote in the referendum.

Residents of the United Kingdom who were citizens of other EU countries were not allowed to vote unless they were citizens (or were also citizens) of the Republic of Ireland, of Malta or of the Republic of Cyprus.

The Representation of the People Acts 1983 (1983 c. 2) and 1985 (1985 c. 50), as amended, also permit certain British citizens (but not other British nationals), who had once lived in the United Kingdom, but had since and in the meantime lived outside of the United Kingdom, but for a period of no more than 15 years, to vote.

Voting on the day of the referendum was from 0700 to 2200 BST (WEST) (0700 to 2200 CEST in Gibraltar) in some 41,000 polling stations manned by over 100,000 staff. Each polling station was specified to have no more than 2,500 registered voters. Under the provisions of the Representation of the People Act 2000, postal ballots were also permitted in the referendum and were sent out to eligible voters some three weeks ahead of the vote (2 June 2016).


Candidates for United Kingdom referendum election

  • Theresa May, Conservatives. 
  • Jeremy Corbyn, Labour.
  • Tim Farron, Liberal Democrats.
  • Nicola Sturgeon, Scottish National Party.
  • Caroline Lucas and Jonathan Bartley, Green Party. 
  • Paul Nuttall, UKIP.


    United Kingdom Parties and leaders

  • Conservative Party.
  • Co-operative Party.
  • Democratic Unionist Party.
  • Green Party.
  • Labour Party.
  • Liberal Democrats.
  • Plaid Cymru.
  • Scottish National Party.


    United Kingdom past election results


United Kingdom Alternative Vote referendum, 2011
National result

Choice

Votes

 %

 

No

13,013,123

67.90%

 

Yes

6,152,607

32.10%

 

Vaild votes

19,165,730

99.41%

Invalid or blank votes

113,292

0.59%

Total votes

19,279,022

100.00%

 

Registered voters and turnout

45,684,501

42.20%

United kingdom referendum election 2017 voting live Results Dates Opinion Exit Poll Candidates

United Kingdom referendum election 2017 Results Voting Live Dates Opinion Exit Poll

United Kingdom referendum election Dates 2017

United Kingdom referendum election Date: 31 December 2017

The United Kingdom European Union membership referendum, also known as the EU referendum and the Brexit referendum, took place on 23 June 2016 in the United Kingdom (UK) and Gibraltar to gauge support for the country either remaining a member of, or leaving, the European Union (EU). The referendum resulted in 51.9% of voters voting in favour of leaving the EU. The government initiated the official EU withdrawal process on 29 March 2017, which put the UK on course to complete the withdrawal process by 30 March 2019.

Membership of the EU and its predecessors has long been a topic of debate in the United Kingdom. The country joined what were then the three European Communities, principally the European Economic Community (EEC, or "Common Market"), in 1973. A first referendum on continued membership of the then European Communities (Common Market) was held in 1975, and it was approved by 67.2% of "Yes" voters compared to 32.8% of "No" voters.

In May 2015, in accordance with a Conservative Party manifesto commitment following that party's surprise victory in the 2015 UK general election, the legal basis for a referendum on EU membership was established by the UK Parliament through the European Union Referendum Act 2015. Britain Stronger in Europe was the official group campaigning for the UK to remain in the EU, and was endorsed by the

Prime Minister David Cameron and Chancellor George Osborne. Vote Leave was the official group campaigning for the UK to leave the EU, and was fronted by the Conservative MP Boris Johnson, Secretary of State for Justice Michael Gove and Labour MP Gisela Stuart. Other campaign groups, political parties, businesses, trade unions, newspapers and prominent individuals were also involved, and each side had supporters from across the political spectrum.


United Kingdom referendum election Voting Live 2017

  1. The European Communities were formed in the 1950s—the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) in 1952, and the European Atomic Energy Community (EAEC or Euratom) and European Economic Community (EEC) in 1957.[1] The EEC, much the largest of the three, came to be known as the "Common Market". The UK first applied to join them in 1961, but this was vetoed by France.
  2. A later application was successful, and the UK joined in 1973; two years later, a referendum on continuing membership resulted in 67.2% approval. Political integration gained greater focus when the Maastricht Treatyestablished the European Union (EU) in 1993, which incorporated (and after the Treaty of Lisbon, succeeded) the European Communities.
  3. Before the 2010 general election, David Cameron had given a "cast iron" promise of a referendum on the Lisbon Treaty, which he backtracked on after all EU countries had ratified the Treaty before the election.

Electoral system of United Kingdom

The right to vote in the referendum in the United Kingdom is defined by the legislation as limited to residents of the United Kingdom who were either also Commonwealth citizens under the British Nationality Act 1948 (which include British citizens

and other British nationals), or those who were also citizens of the Republic of Ireland, or both. Members of the House of Lords were able to vote in the referendum.

Residents of the United Kingdom who were citizens of other EU countries were not allowed to vote unless they were citizens (or were also citizens) of the Republic of Ireland, of Malta or of the Republic of Cyprus.

The Representation of the People Acts 1983 (1983 c. 2) and 1985 (1985 c. 50), as amended, also permit certain British citizens (but not other British nationals), who had once lived in the United Kingdom, but had since and in the meantime lived outside of the United Kingdom, but for a period of no more than 15 years, to vote.

Voting on the day of the referendum was from 0700 to 2200 BST (WEST) (0700 to 2200 CEST in Gibraltar) in some 41,000 polling stations manned by over 100,000 staff. Each polling station was specified to have no more than 2,500 registered voters. Under the provisions of the Representation of the People Act 2000, postal ballots were also permitted in the referendum and were sent out to eligible voters some three weeks ahead of the vote (2 June 2016).


Candidates for United Kingdom referendum election

N/A


United Kingdom Parties and leaders

  • Conservative Party.
  • Co-operative Party.
  • Democratic Unionist Party.
  • Green Party.
  • Labour Party.
  • Liberal Democrats.
  • Plaid Cymru.
  • Scottish National Party.

United Kingdom past election results


United Kingdom Alternative Vote referendum, 2011
National result

Choice

Votes

 %

 

No

13,013,123

67.90%

 

Yes

6,152,607

32.10%

 

Vaild votes

19,165,730

99.41%

Invalid or blank votes

113,292

0.59%

Total votes

19,279,022

100.00%

 

Registered voters and turnout

45,684,501

42.20%

 

United Kingdom UK Cabinet Ministers List 2017 portfolios Names Conservatives Minister Post government ministers

United Kingdom UK Cabinet Ministers List 2017

United Kingdom UK General Elections Dates 2017

National General Elections Date: 8 June 2017

Following the 8 June 2017 British general election, which resulted in a hung parliament, Theresa May announced her intention to form the second May ministry, a Conservative minority government with Democratic Unionist Party support.


United Kingdom UK Cabinet Ministers List 2017

Portfolio

Minister Term
Cabinet ministers    
Prime Minister The Rt Hon. Theresa May MP 2016–
First Lord of the Treasury    
Minister for the Civil Service    
Chancellor of the Exchequer The Rt Hon. Philip Hammond MP 2016–
Second Lord of the Treasury    
Secretary of State for the Home Department The Rt Hon. Amber Rudd MP 2016–
Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs The Rt Hon. Boris Johnson MP 2016–
Secretary of State for Defence The Rt Hon. Sir Michael Fallon KCB MP 2014–
Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union The Rt Hon. David Davis MP 2016–
Secretary of State for International Trade    
Secretary of State for Justice    
Secretary of State for Education    
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy  
Secretary of State for Health    
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions    
Leader of the House of Lords    
Secretary of State for Transport    
Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government  
Leader of the House of Commons    
Secretary of State for Scotland    
Secretary of State for Wales    
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland    
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs  
Secretary of State for International Development  
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport    
Also attending cabinet meetings    
Chief Secretary to the Treasury    
Attorney General    
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster    

 

List of ministers UK United Kingdom

Prime Minister and Cabinet Office

   
Post Minister Term
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom The Rt Hon. Theresa May MP July 2016–
First Lord of the Treasury    
Minister for the Civil Service    
Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Prime Minister George Hollingbery MP July 2016–
Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster The Rt Hon. Sir Patrick McLoughlin MP July 2016–
Chairman of the Conservative Party (unpaid)  
Minister for the Cabinet Office    
Paymaster General    
Leader of the House of Commons The Rt Hon. David Lidington CBE MP July 2016–
Lord President of the Council    
Parliamentary Secretary at the Cabinet Office Chris Skidmore MP July 2016–
Minister for the Constitution    
     
     
Departments of state

   
     
Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy    
Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy The Rt Hon. Greg Clark MP July 2016–
(President of the Board of Trade 15–19 July 2016)  
Minister of State for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation Jo Johnson MP May 2015–
  (jointly with Education)  
Minister of State for Climate Change and Industry The Hon. Nick Hurd MP July 2016–
Minister of State for Energy and Intellectual Property The Baroness Neville-Rolfe DBE CMG July 2016 – Dec 2016
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Energy and Intellectual Property The Lord Prior of Brampton PC Dec 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Margot James MP July 2016–
Minister for Small Business, Consumers and Corporate Responsibility
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Jesse Norman MP July 2016–
Minister for Industry and Energy    
Communities and Local Government    
Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government The Rt Hon. Sajid Javid MP July 2016–
Minister of State for Housing and Planning The Rt Hon. Gavin Barwell July 2016–
Minister for London    
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Marcus Jones MP May 2015–
Minister for Local Government    
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Andrew Percy MP July 2016–
Minister for the Northern Powerhouse    
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Communities The Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (also with Wales) July 2016–
Culture, Media and Sport    
Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport The Rt Hon. Karen Bradley MP July 2016–
Minister of State for Digital and Culture The Rt Hon. Matthew Hancock MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Tracey Crouch MP May 2015–
Minister for Sport, Heritage, and Tourism  
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Rob Wilson MP July 2016–
Minister for Civil Society    
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State The Lord Ashton of Hyde July 2016–
  (also Lord-in-Waiting)  
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State The Baroness Shields OBE May 2015 – Dec 2016
Minister for Internet Safety and Security (with Home Office until Dec 2016) (unpaid)
Defence    
Secretary of State for Defence The Rt Hon. Sir Michael Fallon KCB MP July 2014–
Minister of State for the Armed Forces The Rt Hon. Mike Penning MP July 2016–
Minister of State The Earl Howe PC May 2015–
  (also Deputy Lords Leader) (unpaid)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Defence Procurement Harriett Baldwin MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Defence Veterans, Reserves and Personnel Lt Col Mark Lancaster TD MP May 2015–
Education and Equalities    
Secretary of State for Education The Rt Hon. Justine Greening MP July 2016–
Minister for Women and Equalities    
Minister of State for Apprenticeships and Skills The Rt Hon. Robert Halfon MP July 2016–
Minister of State for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation Jo Johnson MP July 2016–
  (jointly with BEIS)  
Minister of State for School Standards The Rt Hon. Nick Gibb MP July 2014–
Minister of State for Vulnerable Children and Families Edward Timpson MP May 2015–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Women, Equalities and Early Years Caroline Dinenage MP May 2015–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the School System The Lord Nash (unpaid) Oct 2013–
Environment, Food and Rural Affairs    
Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs The Rt Hon. Andrea Leadsom MP July 2016–
Minister of State for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food George Eustice MP October 2013–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for the Environment and Rural Life Opportunities Dr Thérèse Coffey MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Rural Affairs and Biosecurity The Lord Gardiner of Kimble July 2016–
Exiting the European Union    
Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union The Rt Hon. David Davis MP July 2016–
Minister of State The Rt Hon. David Jones MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State The Hon. Robin Walker MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State The Lord Bridges of Headley MBE July 2016–
Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs    
Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs The Rt Hon. Boris Johnson MP July 2016–
Minister of State for Europe and the Americas The Rt Hon. Sir Alan Duncan KCMG MP July 2016–
Minister of State for the Commonwealth and the UN The Baroness Anelay of St John's DBE PC July 2016–
  (with International Development until October 2016)
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Alok Sharma MP July 2016–
Minister for Asia and the Pacific    
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State The Rt Hon. Tobias Ellwood MP July 2016–
Minister for the Middle East and Africa    
Health    
Secretary of State for Health The Rt Hon. Jeremy Hunt MP September 2012–
Minister of State for Health Philip Dunne MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Public Health and Innovation Nicola Blackwood MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Community Health and Care David Mowat MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State The Lord Prior of Brampton PC May 2015 – Dec 2016
  The Lord O'Shaughnessy (also a whip) Dec 2016–
Home Office    
Secretary of State for the Home Department The Rt Hon. Amber Rudd MP July 2016–
Minister of State for Security The Rt Hon. Ben Wallace MP July 2016–
Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Services Brandon Lewis MP July 2016–
Minister of State for Immigration Robert Goodwill MP July 2016–
Minister of State The Baroness Williams of Trafford July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Vulnerability, Safeguarding and Countering Extremism Sarah Newton MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Internet Safety and Security The Baroness Shields OBE July 2016–
  (with Culture until Dec 2016) (unpaid)
International Development    
Secretary of State for International Development The Rt Hon. Priti Patel MP July 2016–
Minister of State Rory Stewart OBE MP July 2016–
Minister of State The Baroness Anelay of St John's DBE PC July–October 2016
  (with Foreign Office)  
  The Lord Bates PC October 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State James Wharton MP July 2016–
International Trade    
Secretary of State for International Trade The Rt Hon. Dr Liam Fox MP July 2016–
President of the Board of Trade (19 July-  
Minister of State for Trade and Investment The Rt Hon. Greg Hands MP July 2016–
Minister of State for Trade Policy The Lord Price CVO July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Mark Garnier MP July 2016–
Justice    
Lord Chancellor The Rt Hon. Elizabeth Truss MP July 2016–
Secretary of State for Justice    
Minister of State for Courts and Justice Sir Oliver Heald QC MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Prisons and Probation Sam Gyimah MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Victims, Youth and Family Justice Dr Phillip Lee MP July 2016–
Northern Ireland    
Secretary of State for Northern Ireland The Rt Hon. James Brokenshire MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Kris Hopkins MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State The Lord Dunlop July 2016–
  (with Scotland)  
Scotland    
Secretary of State for Scotland The Rt Hon. David Mundell MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State The Lord Dunlop July 2016–
  (with Northern Ireland)  
Transport    
Secretary of State for Transport The Rt Hon. Chris Grayling MP July 2016–
Minister of State The Rt Hon. John Hayes CBE MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Paul Maynard MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Andrew Jones MP May 2015–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State The Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon May 2015–
Treasury    
Chancellor of the Exchequer The Rt Hon. Philip Hammond MP July 2016–
Second Lord of the Treasury    
Chief Secretary to the Treasury The Rt Hon. David Gauke MP July 2016–
Financial Secretary to the Treasury Jane Ellison July 2016–
Economic Secretary to the Treasury (City Minister) Simon Kirby July 2016–
Commercial Secretary to the Treasury The Lord O'Neill of Gatley July 2016 – Sept 2016
  (unpaid)  
  The Baroness Neville-Rolfe DBE CMG Dec 2016–
Wales    
Secretary of State for Wales The Rt Hon. Alun Cairns MP March 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State Guto Bebb MP March 2016–
  (also a Whip) (unpaid)  
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State The Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth May 2015–
  (also with Communities & Local Government)
Work and Pensions    
Secretary of State for Work and Pensions The Rt Hon. Damian Green MP July 2016–
Minister of State for Disabled People, Work and Health Penny Mordaunt MP July 2016–
Minister of State for Employment Damian Hinds MP July 2016–
Minister of State for Welfare Reform The Lord Freud PC May 2015–31 Dec 2016
  (unpaid)  
Parliamentary under-Secretary of State The Lord Henley PC (also a whip) (unpaid) 21 Dec 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Welfare Delivery Caroline Nokes MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Pensions Richard Harrington MP July 2016–
     
Law officers    
     
Attorney General's Office    
Attorney General for England and Wales The Rt Hon. Jeremy Wright QC MP July 2014–
Solicitor General for England and Wales Robert Buckland QC MP July 2014–
Office of the Advocate General for Scotland  
Advocate General for Scotland   The Lord Keen of Elie QC
     
Parliament    
     
House Leaders    
Leader of the House of Commons The Rt Hon. David Lidington CBE MP July 2016–
Lord President of the Council    
Parliamentary Secretary Michael Ellis MP (unpaid) July 2016–
Deputy Leader of the House of Commons  
(also a Whip)    
Leader of the House of Lords The Baroness Evans of Bowes Park PC July 2016–
Lord Privy Seal    
Deputy Leader of the House of Lords The Earl Howe PC May 2015–
(unpaid; also with Defence)    
House of Commons Whips    
Government Chief Whip The Rt Hon. Gavin Williamson CBE MP July 2016–
Parliamentary Secretary to the Treasury    
Treasurer of the Household The Rt Hon. Anne Milton MP May 2015–
Deputy Chief Whip    
Comptroller of the Household The Rt Hon. Mel Stride MP July 2016–
Whip    
Vice-Chamberlain of the Household Julian Smith MP July 2016–
Whip    
Lords Commissioners of the Treasury The Rt Hon. David Evennett MP Sep 2012–
Whips Stephen Barclay MP July 2016–
  Guto Bebb MP Mar 2016–
  (also with Wales Office)  
  Guy Opperman MP July 2016–
  Andrew Griffiths MP (unpaid) July 2016–
  Robert Syms MP July 2016–
Assistant Whips Chris Heaton-Harris MP July 2016–
  Heather Wheeler MP July 2016–
  Graham Stuart MP July 2016–
  Steve Brine MP (unpaid) July 2016–
  Mark Spencer MP July 2016–
  Christopher Pincher MP July 2016–
  Jackie Doyle-Price MP May 2015–
  Michael Ellis MP July 2016–
  (also Deputy Commons Leader)
House of Lords Whips    
Chief Whip The Lord Taylor of Holbeach CBE PC Aug 2014–
Captain of the Honourable Corps of Gentlemen-at-Arms  
Captain of the Yeomen of the Guard The Earl of Courtown July 2016–
Deputy Chief Whip    
Lords and Baronesses in Waiting The Lord Ashton of Hyde July 2014–
Whips The Baroness Chisholm of Owlpen (unpaid) May 2015 – Dec 2016
  The Baroness Goldie DL (unpaid from Dec 2016) July 2016–
  The Baroness Buscombe (unpaid) Dec 2016–
  The Baroness Vere of Norbiton (unpaid) Dec 2016–
  The Baroness Mobarik CBE (unpaid) July 2016 – April 2017
  The Viscount Younger of Leckie Bt May 2015–
  The Lord Young of Cookham Bt CH PC July 2016–
  The Lord Henley PC (also with Work & Pensions from Dec 2016) Nov 2016–
  The Lord O'Shaughnessy (also with Health) Dec 2016–

United Kingdom UK General election Results 2017 Live Seats Winner Constituency

United Kingdom UK General election Results 2017 Live Seats Winner Constituency

UK General election Dates 2017

United Kingdom election Date: 8 June 2017

The United Kingdom general election of 2017 is due to take place on Thursday 8 June 2017. In line with the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011, there had been an election due to take place on 7 May 2020, but a call for a snap election by Prime Minister Theresa May received the necessary super-majority of two-thirds to allow it to proceed when it was supported by a vote of 522 to 13 of the 650 Members of Parliament in the House of Commons on 19 April 2017.
At general elections in the United Kingdom, voting takes place in single-member constituencies to elect Members of Parliament (MPs) to seats in the House of Commons, the lower house of the Parliament. There are 650 constituencies represented in the House, with an MP for each constituency. The leader of the party or coalition of parties that can command a majority of elected members will be invited by the British Monarch to become the next Prime Minister.


It is the first snap election in the United Kingdom since October 1974 and it is anticipated to be the last general election before the United Kingdom leaves the European Union – a process due to be completed by March 2019.


United Kingdom UK General election Results 2017 Live by Party

United Kingdom UK General election Results 2017 Live by Party (649/650 declared)
Party Seats Vote%
Conservative 318 48.9%
Labour 261 40.2%
SNP 35 5.4%
Liberal Democrat 12 1.8%
DUP 10 1.5%
Sinn Fein 7 1.1%
Plaid Cymru 4 0.6%
Green Party 1 0.2%
UKIP 0 0%

United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 exit polls

Exit polls will be released after 10 PM when voting gets over.

Acc to last Opinion poll Theresa May is ahead of Corbyn by 10 points.

  1. Exit Poll predicts hung parliament and 'no Conservatives majority'
  2. BBC/Sky/ITV exit poll, indicated following results the Tories  will win 314 seats and Labour 266 (326 is needed for majority), SNP 34, Lib Dems 14

 

UK Exit Polls 2017 (BBC/ITV)
Party Seats Predicted
Conservative 314
Labour 266
SNP 34
Lib Dems 14

 

United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 Opinion Poll Predictions Results


United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 Opinion Poll Latest

Latest Poll conducted by Survey monkey with a sample size of 11000 shows Theresa May winning with a margin of 10% which is considerably low compared to what it was when the elections were announced. Recent UK attacks did seem to have an effect on approval ratings of May.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Date(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Polling organisation/client Sample size Theresa May Jeremy Corbyn None of these Not sure Lead
conducted              
06-06-2017 Survey Monkey/The Sun 11000 55.00% 45.00% 10.00%
4–6 Jun Opinium 3002 42.00% 29.00% 19.00% 10.00% 13.00%
2–3 Jun Survation 1103 50.00% 36.00% N/A 15.00% 14.00%
31 May–2 Jun ComRes 2038 49.00% 34.00% N/A 17.00% 15.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Electoral system of UK United Kingdom

At general elections in the United Kingdom, voting takes place in single member constituencies to elect Members of Parliament (MPs) to seats in the House of Commons, the lower house of the Parliament. There are 650 constituencies represented in the House, though it had been proposed that this number would be reduced to 600 for the next general election. In the event of an early general election, the current constituency boundaries will remain. The leader of the party or coalition of parties that can command a majority is likely to be invited by the Queen to become the next Prime Minister.


Candidates for UK General election 2017

Party

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leader Current seats
Conservative Theresa May 330
Labour Jeremy Corbyn 229
SNP Nicola Sturgeon 54
Liberal Democrat Tim Farron 9
DUP Arlene Foster 8
Sinn Féin Gerry Adams 4
Plaid Cymru Leanne Wood 3
SDLP Colum Eastwood 3
UUP Robin Swann 2
Green (E&W) Caroline Lucas and 1
  Jonathan Bartley  
Independents N/A 5
Speaker    
Total N/A 650

UK Parties and leaders

Almost all of the major parties are expected to contest this election having changed leader since May 2015; the Scottish National Party, Sinn Féin, and Plaid Cymru are the only major parties whose leaders were serving at the previous general election. In July 2016, Theresa May replaced David Cameron as Conservative leader and Prime Minister, and in 2015, Jeremy Corbyn replaced Ed Miliband as Labour leader, while Tim Farron replaced Nick Clegg as leader of the Liberal Democrats. Paul Nuttall leads the UK Independence Party (UKIP) following Diane James' resignation shortly after being elected in September 2016, while Caroline Lucas and Jonathan Bartley jointly lead the Green Party. In November 2015, Colum Eastwood became SDLP leader and Arlene Foster became DUP leader, while Robin Swann became UUP leader in March 2017.


UK General election Opinion Poll 2017

Date(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Polling organisation/client Sample size Con Lab UKIP Lib Dem Lead
conducted              
18-Apr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ICM/The Guardian 1000 46.00% 25.00% 8.00% 11.00% 21.00%
14–17 Apr ICM  ? 44.00% 26.00% 11.00% 12.00% 18.00%
12–13 Apr YouGov/The Times 2069 44.00% 23.00% 10.00% 12.00% 21.00%

UK General election Results 2015

After all 650 constituencies had been declared, the results were

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Party Leader MPs     Votes  
      Of total     Of total
Conservative Party David Cameron 330 50.80% 330 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
11300109 36.80%
Labour Party Ed Miliband 232 35.70% 232 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
9347324 30.50%
Scottish National Party Nicola Sturgeon 56 8.60% 56 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
1454436 4.70%
Liberal Democrats Nick Clegg 8 1.20% 8 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
2415862 7.90%
Democratic Unionist Party Peter Robinson 8 1.20% 8 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
184260 0.60%
Sinn Féin Gerry Adams 4 0.60% 4 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
176232 0.60%
Plaid Cymru Leanne Wood 3 0.50% 3 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
181704 0.60%
SDLP Alasdair McDonnell 3 0.50% 3 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
99809 0.30%
Ulster Unionist Party Mike Nesbitt 2 0.30% 2 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
114935 0.40%
UK Independence Party Nigel Farage 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
3881099 12.70%
Green Party Natalie Bennett 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
1157613 3.80%
Speaker John Bercow 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
34617 0.10%
Independent Sylvia Hermon 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
17689 0.06%

UK Elections 2017

United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 exit polls

United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 exit polls

UK General election Dates 2017

United Kingdom election Date: 8 June 2017

The United Kingdom general election of 2017 is due to take place on Thursday 8 June 2017. In line with the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011, there had been an election due to take place on 7 May 2020, but a call for a snap election by Prime Minister Theresa May received the necessary super-majority of two-thirds to allow it to proceed when it was supported by a vote of 522 to 13 of the 650 Members of Parliament in the House of Commons on 19 April 2017.
At general elections in the United Kingdom, voting takes place in single-member constituencies to elect Members of Parliament (MPs) to seats in the House of Commons, the lower house of the Parliament. There are 650 constituencies represented in the House, with an MP for each constituency. The leader of the party or coalition of parties that can command a majority of elected members will be invited by the British Monarch to become the next Prime Minister.


It is the first snap election in the United Kingdom since October 1974 and it is anticipated to be the last general election before the United Kingdom leaves the European Union – a process due to be completed by March 2019.

United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 exit polls

Exit polls will be released after 10 PM when voting gets over.

Acc to last Opinion poll Theresa May is ahead of Corbyn by 10 points.

  1. Exit Poll predicts hung parliament and 'no Conservatives majority'
  2. BBC/Sky/ITV exit poll, indicated following results the Tories  will win 314 seats and Labour 266 (326 is needed for majority), SNP 34, Lib Dems 14

United Kingdom UK General election Results 2017 Live Seats Winner Constituency

UK Exit Polls 2017 (BBC/ITV)
Party Seats Predicted
Conservative 314
Labour 266
SNP 34
Lib Dems 14

United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 Voting live Results

  1. UK goes to the polls to elect 650 new MPs
  2. Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn fighting to be PM
  3. Polling stations open at 7am and will close at 10pm

 

United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 Opinion Poll Predictions Results


United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 Opinion Poll Latest

Latest Poll conducted by Survey monkey with a sample size of 11000 shows Theresa May winning with a margin of 10% which is considerably low compared to what it was when the elections were announced. Recent UK attacks did seem to have an effect on approval ratings of May.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Date(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Polling organisation/client Sample size Theresa May Jeremy Corbyn None of these Not sure Lead
conducted              
06-06-2017 Survey Monkey/The Sun 11000 55.00% 45.00% 10.00%
4–6 Jun Opinium 3002 42.00% 29.00% 19.00% 10.00% 13.00%
2–3 Jun Survation 1103 50.00% 36.00% N/A 15.00% 14.00%
31 May–2 Jun ComRes 2038 49.00% 34.00% N/A 17.00% 15.00%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Electoral system of UK United Kingdom

At general elections in the United Kingdom, voting takes place in single member constituencies to elect Members of Parliament (MPs) to seats in the House of Commons, the lower house of the Parliament. There are 650 constituencies represented in the House, though it had been proposed that this number would be reduced to 600 for the next general election. In the event of an early general election, the current constituency boundaries will remain. The leader of the party or coalition of parties that can command a majority is likely to be invited by the Queen to become the next Prime Minister.


Candidates for UK General election 2017

Party

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leader Current seats
Conservative Theresa May 330
Labour Jeremy Corbyn 229
SNP Nicola Sturgeon 54
Liberal Democrat Tim Farron 9
DUP Arlene Foster 8
Sinn Féin Gerry Adams 4
Plaid Cymru Leanne Wood 3
SDLP Colum Eastwood 3
UUP Robin Swann 2
Green (E&W) Caroline Lucas and 1
  Jonathan Bartley  
Independents N/A 5
Speaker    
Total N/A 650

UK Parties and leaders

Almost all of the major parties are expected to contest this election having changed leader since May 2015; the Scottish National Party, Sinn Féin, and Plaid Cymru are the only major parties whose leaders were serving at the previous general election. In July 2016, Theresa May replaced David Cameron as Conservative leader and Prime Minister, and in 2015, Jeremy Corbyn replaced Ed Miliband as Labour leader, while Tim Farron replaced Nick Clegg as leader of the Liberal Democrats. Paul Nuttall leads the UK Independence Party (UKIP) following Diane James' resignation shortly after being elected in September 2016, while Caroline Lucas and Jonathan Bartley jointly lead the Green Party. In November 2015, Colum Eastwood became SDLP leader and Arlene Foster became DUP leader, while Robin Swann became UUP leader in March 2017.


UK General election Opinion Poll 2017

Date(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Polling organisation/client Sample size Con Lab UKIP Lib Dem Lead
conducted              
18-Apr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ICM/The Guardian 1000 46.00% 25.00% 8.00% 11.00% 21.00%
14–17 Apr ICM  ? 44.00% 26.00% 11.00% 12.00% 18.00%
12–13 Apr YouGov/The Times 2069 44.00% 23.00% 10.00% 12.00% 21.00%

UK General election Results 2015

After all 650 constituencies had been declared, the results were

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Party Leader MPs     Votes  
      Of total     Of total
Conservative Party David Cameron 330 50.80% 330 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
11300109 36.80%
Labour Party Ed Miliband 232 35.70% 232 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
9347324 30.50%
Scottish National Party Nicola Sturgeon 56 8.60% 56 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
1454436 4.70%
Liberal Democrats Nick Clegg 8 1.20% 8 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
2415862 7.90%
Democratic Unionist Party Peter Robinson 8 1.20% 8 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
184260 0.60%
Sinn Féin Gerry Adams 4 0.60% 4 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
176232 0.60%
Plaid Cymru Leanne Wood 3 0.50% 3 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
181704 0.60%
SDLP Alasdair McDonnell 3 0.50% 3 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
99809 0.30%
Ulster Unionist Party Mike Nesbitt 2 0.30% 2 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
114935 0.40%
UK Independence Party Nigel Farage 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
3881099 12.70%
Green Party Natalie Bennett 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
1157613 3.80%
Speaker John Bercow 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
34617 0.10%
Independent Sylvia Hermon 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
17689 0.06%

UK Elections 2017

United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 Voting live Results

United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 Voting live Results

UK General election Dates 2017

United Kingdom election Date: 8 June 2017

The United Kingdom general election of 2017 is due to take place on Thursday 8 June 2017. In line with the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011, there had been an election due to take place on 7 May 2020, but a call for a snap election by Prime Minister Theresa May received the necessary super-majority of two-thirds to allow it to proceed when it was supported by a vote of 522 to 13 of the 650 Members of Parliament in the House of Commons on 19 April 2017.
At general elections in the United Kingdom, voting takes place in single-member constituencies to elect Members of Parliament (MPs) to seats in the House of Commons, the lower house of the Parliament. There are 650 constituencies represented in the House, with an MP for each constituency. The leader of the party or coalition of parties that can command a majority of elected members will be invited by the British Monarch to become the next Prime Minister.
It is the first snap election in the United Kingdom since October 1974 and it is anticipated to be the last general election before the United Kingdom leaves the European Union – a process due to be completed by March 2019.

United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 Voting live Results

  1. UK goes to the polls to elect 650 new MPs
  2. Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn fighting to be PM
  3. Polling stations open at 7am and will close at 10pm

 

United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 Opinion Poll Predictions Results


United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 Opinion Poll Latest

Latest Poll conducted by Survey monkey with a sample size of 11000 shows Theresa May winning with a margin of 10% which is considerably low compared to what it was when the elections were announced. Recent UK attacks did seem to have an effect on approval ratings of May.

 

 

 


Date(s)

 

 

 

Polling organisation/client Sample size Theresa May Jeremy Corbyn None of these Not sure Lead
conducted              
06-06-2017 Survey Monkey/The Sun 11000 55.00% 45.00% 10.00%
4–6 Jun Opinium 3002 42.00% 29.00% 19.00% 10.00% 13.00%
2–3 Jun Survation 1103 50.00% 36.00% N/A 15.00% 14.00%
31 May–2 Jun ComRes 2038 49.00% 34.00% N/A 17.00% 15.00%

 

 

 

Electoral system of UK United Kingdom

At general elections in the United Kingdom, voting takes place in single member constituencies to elect Members of Parliament (MPs) to seats in the House of Commons, the lower house of the Parliament. There are 650 constituencies represented in the House, though it had been proposed that this number would be reduced to 600 for the next general election. In the event of an early general election, the current constituency boundaries will remain. The leader of the party or coalition of parties that can command a majority is likely to be invited by the Queen to become the next Prime Minister.


Candidates for UK General election 2017

Party

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leader Current seats
Conservative Theresa May 330
Labour Jeremy Corbyn 229
SNP Nicola Sturgeon 54
Liberal Democrat Tim Farron 9
DUP Arlene Foster 8
Sinn Féin Gerry Adams 4
Plaid Cymru Leanne Wood 3
SDLP Colum Eastwood 3
UUP Robin Swann 2
Green (E&W) Caroline Lucas and 1
  Jonathan Bartley  
Independents N/A 5
Speaker    
Total N/A 650

UK Parties and leaders

Almost all of the major parties are expected to contest this election having changed leader since May 2015; the Scottish National Party, Sinn Féin, and Plaid Cymru are the only major parties whose leaders were serving at the previous general election. In July 2016, Theresa May replaced David Cameron as Conservative leader and Prime Minister, and in 2015, Jeremy Corbyn replaced Ed Miliband as Labour leader, while Tim Farron replaced Nick Clegg as leader of the Liberal Democrats. Paul Nuttall leads the UK Independence Party (UKIP) following Diane James' resignation shortly after being elected in September 2016, while Caroline Lucas and Jonathan Bartley jointly lead the Green Party. In November 2015, Colum Eastwood became SDLP leader and Arlene Foster became DUP leader, while Robin Swann became UUP leader in March 2017.


UK General election Opinion Poll 2017

Date(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Polling organisation/client Sample size Con Lab UKIP Lib Dem Lead
conducted              
18-Apr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ICM/The Guardian 1000 46.00% 25.00% 8.00% 11.00% 21.00%
14–17 Apr ICM  ? 44.00% 26.00% 11.00% 12.00% 18.00%
12–13 Apr YouGov/The Times 2069 44.00% 23.00% 10.00% 12.00% 21.00%

UK General election Results 2015

After all 650 constituencies had been declared, the results were

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Party Leader MPs     Votes  
      Of total     Of total
Conservative Party David Cameron 330 50.80% 330 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
11300109 36.80%
Labour Party Ed Miliband 232 35.70% 232 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
9347324 30.50%
Scottish National Party Nicola Sturgeon 56 8.60% 56 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
1454436 4.70%
Liberal Democrats Nick Clegg 8 1.20% 8 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
2415862 7.90%
Democratic Unionist Party Peter Robinson 8 1.20% 8 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
184260 0.60%
Sinn Féin Gerry Adams 4 0.60% 4 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
176232 0.60%
Plaid Cymru Leanne Wood 3 0.50% 3 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
181704 0.60%
SDLP Alasdair McDonnell 3 0.50% 3 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
99809 0.30%
Ulster Unionist Party Mike Nesbitt 2 0.30% 2 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
114935 0.40%
UK Independence Party Nigel Farage 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
3881099 12.70%
Green Party Natalie Bennett 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
1157613 3.80%
Speaker John Bercow 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
34617 0.10%
Independent Sylvia Hermon 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
17689 0.06%

UK Elections 2017

United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 Opinion Poll Predictions Results

United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 Opinion Poll Predictions Results

UK General election Dates 2017

United Kingdom election Date: 8 June 2017

The United Kingdom general election of 2017 is due to take place on Thursday 8 June 2017. In line with the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011, there had been an election due to take place on 7 May 2020, but a call for a snap election by Prime Minister Theresa May received the necessary super-majority of two-thirds to allow it to proceed when it was supported by a vote of 522 to 13 of the 650 Members of Parliament in the House of Commons on 19 April 2017.
At general elections in the United Kingdom, voting takes place in single-member constituencies to elect Members of Parliament (MPs) to seats in the House of Commons, the lower house of the Parliament. There are 650 constituencies represented in the House, with an MP for each constituency. The leader of the party or coalition of parties that can command a majority of elected members will be invited by the British Monarch to become the next Prime Minister.
It is the first snap election in the United Kingdom since October 1974 and it is anticipated to be the last general election before the United Kingdom leaves the European Union – a process due to be completed by March 2019.


United Kingdom UK General snap election 2017 Opinion Poll Latest

Latest Poll conducted by Survey monkey with a sample size of 11000 shows Theresa May winning with a margin of 10% which is considerably low compared to what it was when the elections were announced. Recent UK attacks did seem to have an effect on approval ratings of May.

 


Date(s)

 

Polling organisation/client Sample size Theresa May Jeremy Corbyn None of these Not sure Lead
conducted              
06-06-2017 Survey Monkey/The Sun 11000 55.00% 45.00% 10.00%
4–6 Jun Opinium 3002 42.00% 29.00% 19.00% 10.00% 13.00%
2–3 Jun Survation 1103 50.00% 36.00% N/A 15.00% 14.00%
31 May–2 Jun ComRes 2038 49.00% 34.00% N/A 17.00% 15.00%

 

Electoral system of UK United Kingdom

At general elections in the United Kingdom, voting takes place in single member constituencies to elect Members of Parliament (MPs) to seats in the House of Commons, the lower house of the Parliament. There are 650 constituencies represented in the House, though it had been proposed that this number would be reduced to 600 for the next general election. In the event of an early general election, the current constituency boundaries will remain. The leader of the party or coalition of parties that can command a majority is likely to be invited by the Queen to become the next Prime Minister.


Candidates for UK General election 2017

Party

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leader Current seats
Conservative Theresa May 330
Labour Jeremy Corbyn 229
SNP Nicola Sturgeon 54
Liberal Democrat Tim Farron 9
DUP Arlene Foster 8
Sinn Féin Gerry Adams 4
Plaid Cymru Leanne Wood 3
SDLP Colum Eastwood 3
UUP Robin Swann 2
Green (E&W) Caroline Lucas and 1
  Jonathan Bartley  
Independents N/A 5
Speaker    
Total N/A 650

UK Parties and leaders

Almost all of the major parties are expected to contest this election having changed leader since May 2015; the Scottish National Party, Sinn Féin, and Plaid Cymru are the only major parties whose leaders were serving at the previous general election. In July 2016, Theresa May replaced David Cameron as Conservative leader and Prime Minister, and in 2015, Jeremy Corbyn replaced Ed Miliband as Labour leader, while Tim Farron replaced Nick Clegg as leader of the Liberal Democrats. Paul Nuttall leads the UK Independence Party (UKIP) following Diane James' resignation shortly after being elected in September 2016, while Caroline Lucas and Jonathan Bartley jointly lead the Green Party. In November 2015, Colum Eastwood became SDLP leader and Arlene Foster became DUP leader, while Robin Swann became UUP leader in March 2017.


UK General election Opinion Poll 2017

Date(s)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Polling organisation/client Sample size Con Lab UKIP Lib Dem Lead
conducted              
18-Apr

 

 

 

 

 

 

ICM/The Guardian 1000 46.00% 25.00% 8.00% 11.00% 21.00%
14–17 Apr ICM  ? 44.00% 26.00% 11.00% 12.00% 18.00%
12–13 Apr YouGov/The Times 2069 44.00% 23.00% 10.00% 12.00% 21.00%

UK General election Results 2015

After all 650 constituencies had been declared, the results were

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Party Leader MPs     Votes  
      Of total     Of total
Conservative Party David Cameron 330 50.80% 330 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
11300109 36.80%
Labour Party Ed Miliband 232 35.70% 232 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
9347324 30.50%
Scottish National Party Nicola Sturgeon 56 8.60% 56 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
1454436 4.70%
Liberal Democrats Nick Clegg 8 1.20% 8 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
2415862 7.90%
Democratic Unionist Party Peter Robinson 8 1.20% 8 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
184260 0.60%
Sinn Féin Gerry Adams 4 0.60% 4 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
176232 0.60%
Plaid Cymru Leanne Wood 3 0.50% 3 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
181704 0.60%
SDLP Alasdair McDonnell 3 0.50% 3 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
99809 0.30%
Ulster Unionist Party Mike Nesbitt 2 0.30% 2 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
114935 0.40%
UK Independence Party Nigel Farage 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
3881099 12.70%
Green Party Natalie Bennett 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
1157613 3.80%
Speaker John Bercow 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
34617 0.10%
Independent Sylvia Hermon 1 0.20% 1 / 650

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
17689 0.06%

UK Elections 2017

British House of Commons 2017 live Voting Dates Opinion Exit Poll Candidates

British House of Commons 2017 Results Voting Live Dates Opinion Exit Poll

British House of Commons Dates 2017

British House of Commons Date: 8 June 2017

The House of Commons of the United Kingdom is the lower house of the country's parliament. Like the upper house, the House, it meets in the Palace of Westminster. Officially, the full name of the house is: The Honorable the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in Parliament assembled.

The House is an elected body consisting of 650 members known as Members of Parliament (MPs). Members are elected to represent constituencies by first-past-the-post and hold their seats until Parliament is dissolved.

The House of Commons of England evolved in the 13th and 14th centuries. It eventually became the House of Commons of Great Britain after the political union with Scotland in 1707, and assumed the title of "House of Commons of Great Britain and Ireland" after the political union with Ireland at the start of the 19th century. The "United Kingdom" referred to was the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1800, and became the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland after the independence of the Irish Free State in 1922. Accordingly, the House of Commons assumed it's current title.

British House of Commons 2017 Results Dates Voting Opinion Poll


British House of Commons Results Live 2017

0% votes Counted

Candidate

Vote %

   
   

Electoral system of British

The total number of names in the United Kingdom appearing in Electoral Registers published on 1 December 2010 and based on a qualifying date of 15 October 2010 was 45,844,691.

 

In England and Wales, anyone who will be aged 18 or over on polling day and who is a national of the United Kingdom (all forms of British nationality but excluding British protected persons), the Republic of Ireland, a Commonwealth country (including FijiZimbabwe and the whole of Cyprus ) or a European Union member state can apply to the Electoral Registration Officer in the district in the UK where they reside with a 'considerable degree of permanence to be listed in that area's Electoral Register.

In Scotland, anyone who will be aged 16 or over on polling day can register to vote as the age for voting in Scottish local elections and elections to the Scottish Parliament is 16. However, voters in Scotland under 18 are not entitled to vote in European Elections or UK General Elections.

A person can still register at his/her ordinary address if he/she will be away temporarily (for example, away working, on holiday, in student accommodation or in hospital). A person who has two homes (such as a university student who has a term-time address and lives at home during holidays) may be able to register to vote at both addresses as long as they are not in the same electoral area(though an elector can only vote once in any single election or referendum).


Candidates for House of Commons 2017

Party/alliance

Party leader(s)

Leader since

Leader's seat

Last election

 %

Seats

 

Conservative Party

Theresa May

July 2016

Maidenhead

36.8%

330

 

Labour Party

Jeremy Corbyn

September 2015

Islington North

30.4%

232

 

Scottish National Party

Nicola Sturgeon

November 2014

None[n 1]

4.7%

56

 

Liberal Democrats

Tim Farron

July 2015

Westmorland and Lonsdale

7.9%

8

 

Plaid Cymru

Leanne Wood

March 2012

None[n 5]

0.6%

3

 

UK Independence Party

Paul Nuttall

November 2016

None[n 6]

12.7%

1

 

Green Party of England and Wales

Caroline Lucas
Jonathan Bartley

September 2016

Brighton Pavilion
None

3.8%

1

Other parties contesting: Scottish Green Party
 


 

British Parties and leaders

Conservative Party, Co-operative Party, Democratic Unionist Party, Green Party, Labour Party, Liberal Democrats.

 


British House of Commons Results

e • d Summary[a] of the May 2015 House of Commons of the United Kingdom results

 

Political party

Leader

MPs

Votes

 

Candidates[182]

Total

Gained

Lost

Net

Of total (%)

Total

Of total (%)

Change[b](%)

 

 

Conservative

David Cameron

647

330

38

10

+28

50.8

11,299,959

36.9

+0.8

 

 

Labour

Ed Miliband

631

232

24

48

−24

35.7

9,344,328

30.4

+1.5

 

 

UKIP

Nigel Farage

624

1

0

1

−1

0.2

3,881,129

12.6

+9.5

 

 

Liberal Democrat

Nick Clegg

631

8

0

48

−48

1.2

2,415,888

7.9

−15.1

 

 

SNP

Nicola Sturgeon

59

56

50

0

+50

8.6

1,454,436

4.7

+3.1

 

 

Green

Natalie BennettEngland & Wales
Patrick Harvie /Maggie ChapmanScotland
Steven AgnewNorthern Ireland

575

1

0

0

0

0.2

1,157,613

3.8

+2.8

 

 

DUP

Peter Robinson

16

8

1

1

0

1.2

184,260

0.6

0.0

 

 

Plaid Cymru

Leanne Wood

40

3

0

0

0

0.5

181,694

0.6

0.0

 

 

Sinn Féin

Gerry Adams

18

4

0

1

−1

0.6

176,232

0.6

0.0

 

 

UUP

Mike Nesbitt

15

2

2

0

+2

0.3

114,935

0.4

N/A[d]

 

 

SDLP

Alasdair McDonnell

18

3

0

0

0

0.5

99,809

0.3

0.0

 

 

Independent

N/A

170

1

0

4

−4[e]

0.2

98,711

0.3

N/A

 

 

Alliance

David Ford

18

0

0

1

−1

0

61,556

0.2

+0.1

 

 

TUSC

Dave Nellist

128

0

0

0

0

0

36,327

0.1

+0.1

 

 

Speaker

John Bercow

1

1

0

0

0

0.2

34,617

0.1

0.0

 

 

National Health Action

Richard Taylor &
Clive Peedell

13

0

0

0

0

0

20,210

0.1

0.0

 

 

TUV

Jim Allister

7

0

0

0

0

0

16,538

0.1

0.0

 

 

Respect

George Galloway

4

0

0

1

−1

0

9,989

0.0

−0.1

 

 

CISTA

Paul Birch

34

0

0

0

0

0

8,419

0.0

New

 

 

Other parties

N/A

 

0

0

0

0

0

7,958

0.0

N/A

 

 

People Before Profit

Collective

1

0

0

0

0

0

7,854

0.0

0.0

 

 

Yorkshire First

Richard Carter

14

0

0

0

0

0

6,811

0.0

New

 

 

English Democrat

Robin Tilbrook

35

0

0

0

0

0

6,531

0.0

−0.2

 

 

Mebyon Kernow

Dick Cole

6

0

0

0

0

0

5,675

0.0

0.0

 

 

Lincolnshire Independent

Marianne Overton

5

0

0

0

0

0

5,407

0.0

0.0

 

 

Liberal

Steve Radford

4

0

0

0

0

0

4,480

0.0

0.0

 

 

Monster Raving Loony

Alan "Howling Laud" Hope

27

0

0

0

0

0

3,898

0.0

0.0

 

 

Independent Save Withybush Save Lives

Chris Overton

1

0

0

0

0

0

3,729

0.0

New

 

 

Socialist Labour

Arthur Scargill

8

0

0

0

0

0

3,481

0.0

0.0

 

 

Christian Peoples

Sidney Cordle

17

0

0

0

0

0

3,260

0.0

0.0

 

 

Christian

Jeff Green

9

0

0

0

0

0

3,205

0.0

−0.1

 

 

No description

N/A

 

0

0

0

0

0

3,012

0.0

N/A

 

 

Workers Party

John Lowry

5

0

0

0

0

0

2,724

0.0

0.0

 

 

North East Party

Hilton Dawson

4

0

0

0

0

0

2,138

0.0

0.0

 

 

Poole People

Mike Howell

1

0

0

0

0

0

1,766

0.0

New

 

 

BNP

Adam Walker

8

0

0

0

0

0

1,667

0.0

−1.9

 

 

Residents for Uttlesford

John Lodge

1

0

0

0

0

0

1,658

0.0

New

 

 

Rochdale First Party

Farooq Ahmed

1

0

0

0

0

0

1,535

0.0

New

 

 

Communist

Robert David Griffiths

9

0

0

0

0

0

1,229

0.0

New

 

 

Pirate

Laurence Kaye

6

0

0

0

0

0

1,130

0.0

0.0

 

 

National Front

Kevin Bryan

7

0

0

0

0

0

1,114

0.0

0.0

 

 

Communities United

Kamran Malik

5

0

0

0

0

0

1,102

0.0

New

 

 

Reality

Mark "Bez" Berry

3

0

0

0

0

0

1,029

0.0

New

 

 

The Southport Party

David Cobham

1

0

0

0

0

0

992

0.0

New

 

 

All People's Party

Prem Goyal

4

0

0

0

0

0

981

0.0

New

 

 

Peace

John Morris

4

0

0

0

0

0

957

0.0

New

 

 

Bournemouth Independent Alliance

David Ross

1

0

0

0

0

0

903

0.0

New

 

 

Socialist (GB)

Collective

10

0

0

0

0

0

899

0.0

New

 

 

Scottish Socialist

Executive Committee

4

0

0

0

0

0

875

0.0

0.0

 

 

Alliance for Green Socialism

Mike Davies

4

0

0

0

0

0

852

0.0

0.0

 

 

Your Vote Could Save Our Hospital

Sandra Allison

1

0

0

0

0

0

849

0.0

New

 

 

Wigan Independents

Gareth Fairhurst

1

0

0

0

0

0

768

0.0

New

 

 

Animal Welfare

Vanessa Hudson

4

0

0

0

0

0

736

0.0

0.0

 

 

Something New

James Smith

2

0

0

0

0

0

695

0.0

New

 

 

Consensus

Helen Tyrer

1

0

0

0

0

0

637

0.0

New

 

 

NLP

National Council

2

0

0

0

0

0

627

0.0

New

 

 

Independents Against Social Injustice

Steve Walmsley

1

0

0

0

0

0

603

0.0

New

 

 

Independence from Europe

Mike Nattrass

5

0

0

0

0

0

578

0.0

New

 

 

Whig

Waleed Ghani

4

0

0

0

0

0

561

0.0

New

 

 

Guildford Greenbelt Group

Susan Parker

1

0

0

0

0

0

538

0.0

New

 

 

Class War

Ian Bone

7

0

0

0

0

0

526

0.0

New

 

 

Above and Beyond

Mark Flanagan

5

0

0

0

0

0

522

0.0

New

 

 

Northern

Mark Dawson

5

0

0

0

0

0

506

0.0

New

 

 

Workers Revolutionary

Sheila Torrance

7

0

0

0

0

0

488

0.0

0.0

 

 

Left Unity

Kate Hudson

3

0

0

0

0

0

455

0.0

New

 

 

Liberty GB

Paul Weston

3

0

0

0

0

0

418

0.0

New

 

 

People First

Collective

1

0

0

0

0

0

407

0.0

New

 

Total

3,921

650

       

30,691,680

   

 

 

United Kingdom UK Local elections 2017 Results live Winner Council Seats

United Kingdom UK Local elections 2017 Results Live

United Kingdom Local elections Dates 2017

National Local elections Date: 4 May 2017

The 2017 United Kingdom local elections will be held on Thursday 4 May 2017.

Local elections will be held across Great Britain, with elections to English, Scottish, and Welsh councils, as well as elections for the newly created English Regional Mayors.

UK Snap Election 2017 Dates

UK Snap Election 2017 Candidates


United Kingdom Local elections Results Live 2017

England Council Election Results Live 2017 – 35 Council Results

Scottish Council Election Results Live 2017 – 35 Council Results

Welsh Council Election Results Live 2017 – 35 Council Results

With the results available from 17 councils
4,851 council seats are being contested. Voters will be choosing six new metro mayors
CON win control of five councils
Labour lose two councils in Blaenau Gwent and Bridgend

Party

 

 

Councils Seats +/-
Conservative 28 1899 563
Labour 9 1152 382
Liberal Democrat 0 441 42
SNP 0 431 7
Plaid Cymru 1 202 33
Green 0 21 1
Scottish Green 0 19 5
RA 0 11 2
Llais Gwynedd 0 6 7
Mebyon Kernow 0 4  
Health Concern 0 2 1
UKIP 0 1 145
Liberal 0 0 3
Independent 6 656 13
No overall control 44 n/a n/a

United Kingdom Mayoral elections Results Live 2017

Combined authority mayors
Six elections for directly elected regional mayors will be held. These newly established positions will lead combined authorities set up by groups of local councils, as part of devolution deals giving the combined authorities additional powers and funding.

Combined Authority

 

 

 

Result
Cambridgeshire and Peterborough James Palmer (Conservative)
Greater Manchester Andy Burnham (Labour)
Liverpool City Region Steve Rotheram (Labour)
Tees Valley Ben Houchen (Conservative)
West of England Tim Bowles (Conservative)
West Midlands Andy Street (Conservative)

Local authority mayors

Two elections for directly elected local district mayors will be held. These Mayors act as council leaders in their local authorities.

Local Authority

 

 

 

Result
Doncaster Ros Jones (Labour)
North Tyneside Norma Redfearn (Labour)

United Kingdom Local elections Voting Live 2017

United Kingdom Local elections will take place on thursday morning 7 am.

  1. Polling stations open from 7am to 10pm on Thursday, May 4.
  2. Votes would be counted either overnight on Thursday or during the day on Friday.
  3. 35 councils in England, All 32 Scottish councils, All 22 Welsh councils
  4. 8 directly elected mayors in England.
  5. n Scotland polls will be held in all councils (1,227 seats) and all 22 councils in Wales (1,254 seats).
  6. In total, 4,851 council seats are up for election. According to a BBC News estimate, the major political parties are defending the following numbers of council seats on election day:

Labour – 1,535 seats


Conservatives – 1,136 seats
Lib Dems – 484 seats
SNP – 438 seats
Plaid Cymru – 170 seats
UKIP – 146 seats
Green Party – 34 seats

There are also 687 independent councillors and 4 Mebyon Kernow councillors. The remaining 217 seats are held by residents' associations and minor parties



Electoral system of United Kingdom

There are six types of elections in the United Kingdom: elections to theHouse of Commons of the United Kingdom, elections to devolved parliaments and assemblies, elections to the European Parliament, local elections, mayoral elections and Police and Crime Commissioner elections. Within each of those categories, there may be by-elections as well as general elections. Elections are held on Election Day, which is conventionally a Thursday. Since the passing of the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 for general elections, all six types of elections are held after fixed periods, though early elections to parliament and the devolved assemblies and parliaments can occur in certain situations. Currently, six electoral systems are used: the single member plurality system (first past the post), the multi member plurality system, party-list proportional representation, the single transferable vote, the additional member system and the supplementary vote.

 


Candidates for Local elections 2017

N/A

 

United Kingdom Parties and leaders

Conservative Party, Co-operative Party, Democratic Unionist Party, Labour Party, Democrats, Plaid, Social Democratic and Labour Party, Ulster Unionist Party.

 

United Kingdom local elections Results 2012

Party

Councils

Councillors

Change

Total

Change

Total

 

Conservative

-10

18

-335

1,116

 

Labour

+3

3

+291

538

 

Liberal Democrat

0

0

-124

352

 

UKIP

0

0

+139

147

 

Green

0

0

+5

22

 

Plaid Cymru

0

0

+6

12

 

Residents

0

0

+2

12

 

Mebyon Kernow

0

0

+1

4

 

Liberal

0

0

+1

3

 

Health Concern

0

0

0

2

 

BNP

0

0

-3

0

 

Independent/Other

0

0

+24

166

 

No overall control

+9

14

United Kingdom Local elections 2017 Results Dates Voting Opinion Poll

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