Croatian presidential Election Date: 22 December 2019 Live Voting

Croatian presidential Election 2019 Voting Live

Croatian presidential Election Dates 2019

Croatian presidential Election Date: 22 December 2019​ 

Presidential elections will be held in Croatia on 22 December 2019. If no candidate receives a majority of all votes cast (including blank and invalid ballots), a second round will take place on 5 January 2020 between the two candidates with the highest number of votes in the first round. They will be the seventh presidential elections since the first direct ones were held in 1992.

The decision to call the election was made by the Croatian Government during its session on 14 November 2019. Potential candidates were required to gather at least 10,000 signatures from Croatian citizens who have reached the age of 18 in order for their candidacy to become official and for their name to appear on the ballot. They were allocated a time frame of 12 days to accomplish this and thus had until midnight local time on 3 December 2019 to present their signatures to the State Electoral Commission. A total of twelve candidates submitted signatures by the deadline and the commission then proceeded to verify the signatures within the following 48 hours, presenting a final list of eleven approved candidates on 5 December 2019.


Croatian presidential Election Voting Live 2019 

1. Past Still Present in Three-Horse Race for Croatian Presidency

  • Anja Vladisavljevic
  • Zagreb
  • BIRN

2. Croatian presidential election set for December 22 November 26, 2019.

3. Croatia's election commission confirms 11 presidential candidates.


Croatian Parties and Leaders

Leader

Party

Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović

Independent

Zoran Milanović

SDP

Miroslav Škoro

Independent

Mislav Kolakušić

Independent

Dalija Orešković

Independent

Ivan Pernar

SIP


Croatian past election results 

First Round

Date(s)-Conducted

Polling-Organisation/Client

Ivo-Josipović

Kolinda-Grabar-Kitarović

Milan-Kujundžić

Ivan-Sinčić

Others

Undecided-/-none

 
 

28-Dec

Exit-polls

38.80%

38.10%

5.70%

15.90%

 

19-Dec

Ipsos-puls-for-Novatv

46.50%

34.90%

7.20%

9.20%

 

18-Dec

Promocija-Plus-for-RTL

42.10%

30.50%

9.30%

7.50%

10.60%

 

4-Dec

Promocija-plus-for-RTL

42.30%

28.30%

11.20%

9.50%

8.70%

 

6-Sep

Promocija-plus

48.90%

32.50%

6.80%

   

4-Sep

Ipsos-puls

45.50%

30.90%

2.10%

9.40%

12.10%

 

4-Aug

Promocija-plus

48.40%

33.60%

4.80%

3.20%

10.00%

 

1-3-Jul

Promocija-plus

49.20%

35.20%

4.30%

1.80%

9.40%

 

June

Promocija-plus

50.10%

29.20%

6.20%

4.80%

9.60%

 

June

Ipsos-puls

50.30%

37.30%

 

12.40%

 

May

Promocija-plus

52.50%

27.00%

6.10%

5.90%

8.60%

 

April

Promocija-plus

51.60%

27.20%

4.50%

8.60%

8.20%

 

March

Promocija-plus

52.20%

28.40%

8.80%

10.70%

 

February

Promocija-plus

54.00%

24.00%

10.30%

11.70%

 

January

Promocija-plus

51.70%

17.40%

19.90%

11.00%

Second Round

Date(s) Conducted

Polling Organisation/Client

Ivo Josipović

Kolinda Grabar-Kitarović

Undecided

11-Jan

Exit polls

48.60%

51.40%

0%

18-Dec

Promocija Plus for RTL

52.00%

41.30%

6.70%

4-Dec

Promocija plus for RTL

50.90%

41.40%

7.70%

 

United Kingdom general Election live voting Results 2019

United Kingdom general Election Dates: 12 December 2019  

The 2019 United Kingdom general election is scheduled to be held on Thursday 12 December 2019. It is to be held under the provisions of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019, two and a half years after the previous general election in June 2017.

The 2019 election is due to be the first UK general election to be held in December since 1923, and was arranged at short notice in late October. Each parliamentary constituency of the United Kingdom elects one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons using the first-past-the-post voting system. This indirectly elects the government, which is formed by a party or coalition of parties that can command the confidence of a majority of MPs in the Commons. Both majority and minority governments are possible election outcomes.


Dates United Kingdom general Election 2019 
 

Further information: Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019

The deadline for delivery of candidates' nomination papers was 14 November. The election is scheduled for 12 December 2019, with polling stations opening at 7am and closing at 10pm.

This date occurred despite the Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011 (FTPA), which introduced fixed-term parliaments to the United Kingdom, with elections scheduled on the first Thursday in May of the fifth year after the previous general election. This would have led to an election on 5 May 2022.On 29 October 2019, the House of Commons passed the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 which circumvented the FTPA so as to hold a December election. The House of Lords followed suit the following day, with Royal Assent the day afterward.

Due to the impasse about the Brexit withdrawal agreement, some political commentators in 2019 considered an early election to be highly likely. In January 2019 a vote of no confidence in Theresa May's government was called by the Labour Party. If passed, and no alternative government could be formed, this would have resulted in a general election, but this motion failed. After becoming Prime Minister in the summer, Boris Johnson made three attempts at a vote for an early general election under the terms of the FTPA, but each failed to achieve the required two-thirds supermajority.The eventually successful bill, which required only a simple majority to pass (though it could be amended during its passage through Parliament), was proposed by the Liberal Democrat and Scottish National parties on 28 October and adopted by the government the following day (albeit with a Thursday 12 December date rather than Monday 9 December proposed by the opposition parties). An amendment changing the date to 9 December failed by 315 votes to 295.The final Commons vote on the bill passed by 438 votes to 20.

The election would be the first UK general election in December since 1923, and the first general election to be held by virtue of an Act of Parliament.

Tuesday 29 October

Passage of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 through the House of Commons

Wednesday 30 October

Passage of the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 through the House of Lords

Thursday 31 October

Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 receives Royal Assent and comes into force immediately. The Act sets 12 December as the date for the next parliamentary general election.

Wednesday 6 November

Dissolution of Parliament (the 57th) and official start of the campaign. Beginning of purdah. Royal Proclamation summoning a new Parliament and setting the date for its first meeting issued.

Thursday 7 November

Receipt of writ – legal documents declaring election issued

From Friday 8 November

Notice of election given in constituencies

Thursday 14 November

Nominations of candidates close

Saturday 16 November

Candidates lists are published for each constituency

Thursday 21 November

Deadline to register for a postal vote at 5pm (Northern Ireland)[33]

Tuesday 26 November

Deadline to register for a postal vote at 5pm (Great Britain)[33]

Deadline for registering to vote at 11:59pm[33]

Wednesday 4 December

Deadline to register for a proxy vote at 5pm. (Exemptions apply for emergencies.)

Thursday 12 December

Polling Day – polls open 7am to 10pm

Friday 13 December

Results to be announced for the majority of the 650 constituencies. End of purdah.

Tuesday 17 December

First meeting of the new (58th) Parliament of the United Kingdom, for the formal election of a Speaker of the Commons and the swearing-in of members, ahead of the State Opening of the new Parliament's first session.


The Electoral system of United Kingdom​ 

Each parliamentary constituency of the United Kingdom elects one MP to the House of Commons using the "first past the post" system. If one party obtains a majority of seats, then that party is entitled to form the Government, with its leader as Prime Minister. If the election results in no single party having a majority, there is a hung parliament. In this case, the options for forming the Government are either a minority government or a coalition.


United Kingdom​ party and Leaders  

Leader

Party

Theresa May

Conservative

Jeremy Corbyn

Labour

Nicola Sturgeon

SNP

Tim Farron

Liberal Democrats

Arlene Foster

DUP

Gerry Adams

Sinn Féin


United Kingdom​ Past Elections Results 

Great Britain

Major parties (parties with multiple MPs at dissolution or those that currently have multiple MEPs) that are contesting this election in Great Britain are shown in the table below with their results at the 2017 general election, ordered by the number of seats they won.

Party

Party leader(s)

Last election

Seats at

% of

Seats

dissolution

votes

 

Conservative Party

Boris Johnson

42.40%

317

298

Labour Party

Jeremy Corbyn

40.00%

262

244

Scottish National Party

Nicola Sturgeon

3.00%

35

35

Liberal Democrats

Jo Swinson

7.40%

12

21

Change UK

Anna Soubry

New party

5

Plaid Cymru

Adam Price

0.50%

4

4

Green Party of England and Wales

Jonathan Bartley

1.60%

1

1

Siân Berry

Brexit Party

Nigel Farage

New party

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Ireland

While a number of UK parties organise in Northern Ireland (including the Labour Party, which does not field candidates) and others field candidates for election (most notably the Conservatives), the main Northern Ireland parties are different from those in the rest of the UK.

Some parties in Northern Ireland operate on an all-Ireland basis, including Sinn Féin and Aontú, who are abstensionist parties and do not take up any Commons seats to which they are elected. The only independent elected to Parliament in 2017, Sylvia Hermon, represented North Down but is not standing in 2019.

For the 2019 election, there are a total of 102 candidates in Northern Ireland.

Party

Leader

Last election

Seats at

Contesting seats

 

dissolution

 

(out of

18 in total)

 

 

%

(in NI)

Seats

 

Democratic Unionist Party

Arlene Foster

36.00%

10

10

17 seats

 

Sinn Féin

Mary Lou McDonald

29.40%

7

7

15 seats

 

Social Democratic & Labour Party

Colum Eastwood

11.70%

0

0

15 seats

 

Ulster Unionist Party

Steve Aiken

10.30%

0

0

16 seats

 

Alliance Party

Naomi Long

7.90%

0

0

18 seats

 

Aontú

Peadar Tóibín

New party

0

7 seats

 

NI Conservatives

Neil Johnston

0.70%

0

0

4 seats

 

(Leader in NI)

 

Green Party of Northern Ireland

Clare Bailey

0.90%

0

0

3 seats

 

People Before Profit

None[n 15]

0.40%

0

0

2 seats

 

Sammarinese General Election​ dates and Voting Live 2019 

Sammarinese General Election​ dates and Voting Live 2019 

Sammarinese General Election​ Dates 2019

Sammarinese General Election​ Date: 8 December 2019 

General elections will be held in San Marino on 8 December 2019. All 60 seats in the Grand and General Council 31 seats needed for a majority.

General elections were held in San Marino on 20 November 2016 and 4 December 2016.The San Marino First alliance received a plurality of the popular vote, but fell short of a majority in the Grand and General Council, initially being allocated 25 seats.As no single bloc had won a majority of seats, a runoff was held on 4 December 2016 between the top two coalitions, San Marino First and Adesso.sm, to determine the winner of the majority prize. The second round saw Adesso.sm win with 58% of the vote, resulting in seats being reallocated and the winning alliance receiving 35 seats.

 


Sammarinese General Election Voting Live 2019 

What You Need To Know For Tuesday's Elections in LA County.

 


 

The Electoral system of Sammarinese  

The 60 members of the Grand and General Council are elected by proportional representation, with seats allocated using the d'Hondt method. The electoral threshold is calculated by multiplying the number of parties running in the elections by 0.4, with a maximum possible threshold of 3.5%.

If no party receives a majority, or the two largest parties are unable to form a coalition government within thirty days of the elections, a runoff election will be held between the two most popular coalitions, with the winner receiving a seat bonus to give them a majority. It is the first time the facultative second round will be applied following its approval in a June 2019 referendum.

 


Sammarinese Elections Results

Coalition

Party

First round

Second round

Votes

%

Seats[a]

Votes

%

Seats[b]

+/–

Sammarinese Christian Democratic Party

5,993

33.35

21

 

 

 

 

Tomorrow in Motion

RETE Movement

3,276

18.23

11

 

 

 

 

Domani Motus Liberi

1,112

6.19

4

 

 

 

 

Direct coalition votes

57

0.32

0

 

 

 

 

Total

4,445

24.73

15

 

 

 

 

Libera

2,964

16.49

10

 

 

 

 

Noi per la Repubblica

2,359

13.13

8

 

 

 

 

Future Republic

1,850

10.29

6

 

 

 

 

Ēlego

361

2.01

0

 

 

 

 

Invalid/blank votes

1,262

 

Total

19,234

100

60

 

 

 

 

Registered voters/turnout

34,511

55.73

 

 

Source: State Secretariat for Internal Affairs and Public Function


 Past Sammarinese Elections Results 

Coalition

Party

First round

Second round

Votes

%

Seats[a]

Votes

%

Seats[b]

+/–

San Marino First

Sammarinese Christian Democratic Party

4,752

24.46

16

6,889

42.08

10

–11

Socialist Party

1,496

7.7

5

3

–4

Party of Socialists and Democrats

1,392

7.17

4

3

–7

Sammarinese (NS–SsC)

414

2.13

0

0

Direct coalition votes

44

0.23

0

0

Total

8,098

41.68

25

16

–22

Adesso.sm

Democratic Socialist Left (SU–PR–LabDem)

2,352

12.11

8

9,482

57.92

14

9

Future Republic (AP–UR)

1,865

9.6

6

11

6

Civic 10

1,800

9.27

6

10

6

Direct coalition votes

88

0.45

0

0

Total

6,105

31.43

20

35

21

Democracy in Motion

RETE Movement

3,561

18.33

12

 

8

4

Democratic Movement – San Marino Together

872

4.49

3

1

New

Direct coalition votes

70

0.36

0

0

Total

4,503

23.18

15

9

4

List of Free People

412

2.12

0

0

New

Sammarinese Democratic Revival

309

1.59

0

0

New

Invalid/blank votes

849

653

Total

20,276

100

60

17,024

100

60

0

Registered voters/turnout

33,985

59.66

33,985

50.09

Source: Segreteria di Stato Libertas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second Round Romanian Presidential Election Date: 24 November 2019

Romanian Presidential Election​ 2019 Voting Results Candidates Live

Romanian Presidential Election Dates 2019

Second Round Romanian Presidential Election Date: 24 November 2019 

Presidential elections were held in Romania on 10 November 2019, with a second round to be held on 24 November 2019. President Klaus Iohannis, who was elected in 2014, is eligible for re-election and qualified for the second round.

Romania Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2019


Romanian Presidential Election Voting Live 2019

Romania's incumbent president won the first round of the presidential elections on Sunday, November 10, with an overall score of 37.8%, according to partial results after the counting of 99.7% of the ballots. Former prime minister Viorica Dancila, the head of the Social Democratic Party (PSD) came second, with a score of 22.3%. Dan Barna, the leader of Save Romania Union (USR), was third, with 14.9%. Next came actor Mircea Diaconu (independent) – 8.9%, Theodor Paleologu (Popular Movement Party – PMP) – 5.7%, Kelemen Hunor (Democrat Magyar Union – UDMR) – 3.9%, Ramona Bruynseels – 2.7%, and Alexandru Cumpanasu – 1.5%.

The results confirm the exit polls presented on Sunday evening, which showed Klaus Iohannis and Viorica Dancila moving to the second round. The actual scores obtained by Iohannis and Dan Barna are slightly lower than in the exit polls.

Close to 9.36 million Romanians voted in the first round of the presidential elections, of whom 8.38 million voted in the country (47.66% of the people registered on the electoral lists), and 675,000 voted abroad – an all-time record.

 


The Electoral system of Romania

The President is elected in a two-round system for a five-year term. If one candidate obtains a majority of 50%+1 of all registered voters in the first round, he or she is declared the winner. If none of the candidates achieves this, then a run-off is held between the two contenders with the top scores in the first round. The candidate who obtains any majority of votes in the run-off is declared the winner.

The term of the president is five years. Between 1992 and 2004 the term was of four years but was increased following the 2003 Constitutional referendum. One person can serve a maximum of two terms, that may be consecutive.

In order to be able to run for the Office of President a candidate must fulfil the following conditions: be a Romanian citizen, be at least 35 years of age (at least on the day of the election), and not have held the office for two terms since 1992, when the 1991 Constitution took effect.


Candidates qualified for the second round

Name of The Party

Name of The Leader

Independent

Klaus Iohannis

PSD

Viorica Dăncilă


Romania Parties and leaders

 

Name of The Party Name of The Leader
Independent Klaus Iohannis
PSD Viorica Dăncilă
USR Dan Barna
Independent Mircea Diaconu
PMP Theodor Paleologu
UDMR Kelemen Hunor

 


Romania First Round election results 

Candidate

Total Score

Domestic Score

Diaspora Score

Klaus Lohannis

37.80%

36.70%

52.90%

Viorica Dancila

22.30%

23.80%

2.70%

Dan Barna

14.90%

14.00%

27.60%

Mircea Diaconu

8.90%

9.30%

3.60%

Theodor Paleoglu

5.70%

5.70%

6.40%

Kelemen Hunor

3.90%

4.10%

0.50%

Ramona Bruynsels

2.70%

2.70%

1.70%

Alexandra Cumpanasu

1.50%

1.50%

2.50%

Spain general election 2019 Result Vote share Parliament

Spain general election 2019 Result Vote share Parliament

Spanish general Election​ 2019 Voting Results Candidates Live Details can be found here. The November 2019 Spanish general election will be held on Sunday, 10 November 2019, to elect the 14th Cortes Generales of the Kingdom of Spain. All 350 seats in the Congress of Deputies will be up for election, as well as 208 of 266 seats in the Senate.

The 2015 Spanish general election was held on Sunday, 20 December 2015, to elect the 11th Cortes Generales of the Kingdom of Spain. All 350 seats in the Congress of Deputies were up for election, as well as 208 of 266 seats in the Senate.

Spain general election 2019 Result Vote share Parliament

1Spain likely to return to the polls in November after-party talks fail.

2. Spanish King Asks Whether It’s Election Time Again for Sanchez.

3. Spanish General Election Candidates Clash over Catalonia.

  • The leader of ultra-right-wing party Vox – Santiago Abascal places his vote in Madrid.
  • Spanish voters are heading back to the polls on Sunday (10 November) for the fourth general election in less than four years

 

Party

Seats

Last

PSOE

120

123

PP

88

66

Vox

52

24

Podemos

35

42

Ciudadanos

10

57


Spain Important Political Information Updates

 


Spain April 2019 Results

Parties and coalitions
Seats Popular vote
  Total Votes
Spanish Socialist Workers' Party (PSOE) 123 7513142
People's Party (PP)1 66 4373653
Citizens–Party of the Citizenry (Cs)1 57 4155665
United We Can (Unidas Podemos) 42 3751145
United We Can (Podemos–IU–Equo)2 33 2897419
In Common We Can–Let's Win the Change (ECP–Guanyem el Canvi) 7 615665
In Common–United We Can (Podemos–EU–Tides in Common–Equo)3 2 238061
Vox (Vox) 24 2688092
Republican Left of Catalonia–Sovereigntists (ERC–Sobiranistes) 15 1024628
Republican Left of Catalonia–Sovereigntists (ERC–Sobiranistes) 15 1020392
Republican Left of the Valencian Country (ERPV) 0 4236
Together for Catalonia–Together (JxCat–Junts)4 7 500787
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) 6 395884
Animalist Party Against Mistreatment of Animals (PACMA) 0 328299
Basque Country Unite (EH Bildu) 4 259647
Commitment: Bloc–Initiative–Greens Equo (Compromís 2019) 1 173821
Canarian Coalition–Canarian Nationalist Party (CCa–PNC) 2 137664
Free People–We Are Alternative–Pirates: Republican Front (Front Republicà) 0 113807
Sum Navarre (NA+)5 2 107619
Galician Nationalist Bloc (BNG) 0 94433
Regionalist Party of Cantabria (PRC) 1 52266

 


Electoral system

The Spanish legislature, the Cortes Generales (Spanish for General Courts), was composed of two chambers at the time of the 2015 election:

  1.     The lower chamber, the Congress of Deputies.
  2.     The upper chamber, the Senate.

ALSO READ: Spain general election 2011 Result Vote share Parliament seat Opinion Exit Poll Schedule

Date Event
26-Oct-15 The Council of Ministers convenes to approve the decree ordering the Cortes Generales' dissolution and the calling of the general election on the advice of the Prime Minister. Subsequently, the decree is ratified by the King.
27-Oct-15 The decree enters into force by its publication in the BOE. Parliament is officially dissolved and the general election is called. Official start of the electoral period.
06-Nov-15 Deadline for parties intending to contest the election in coalition with other parties to communicate it to the appropriate electoral boards.
11–16 November 2015 Time limit for parties intending to contest the election to submit their candidacies to the Electoral Board.
18-Nov-15 Submitted candidacies are provisionally published in the BOE.
21-Nov-15 Deadline for Spanish electors residing abroad to apply for voting.
21–25 November 2015 Sweepstakes to appoint members of the polling stations.
24-Nov-15 Candidacies for parties, coalitions and groups of voters standing for election are proclaimed and published in the BOE after a period of notification and amendment of possible irregularities in 20–22 November 2015.
04-Dec-15 Official start of the electoral campaign at 00:00 CET (UTC+01:00).
10-Dec-15 Deadline for electors residing in Spain to apply for postal voting.
15–19 December 2015 Legal ban on opinion polling publication in Spanish territory.
18-Dec-15 Official end of the electoral campaign at 24:00 CET (UTC+01:00).
19-Dec-15 Reflection day.
20-Dec-15 Election Day. Polls open from 09:00 CET to 20:00 CET. Provisional vote count officially starting from 21:00 CET. From this day, the incumbent government assumes caretaker functions until a new government is formed.
13-Jan-16 The elected Congress and Senate convene.
 
From the Cortes' convening but without a defined term, the King calls for a round of talks with political parties' representatives so that, depending on each other parliamentary representation, nominate a candidate for Prime Minister, which is submitted to Congress for an investiture debate and subsequent vote.
The nominated candidate must muster an absolute majority of votes in the first ballot, or a relative majority in a second ballot to be held 48 hours after the first, in order to be elected. If within two months from the first investiture vote no candidate has obtained the confidence of Congress, the Cortes Generales are dissolved and a new general election called.
 

Opinion polls

7 December debate

Who do you believe has won the debate?

Polling firm/Link Sample
size
Soraya Sáenz de Santamaría Pedro Sánchez Pablo Iglesias Albert Rivera
       
Redondo & Asociados 600 30.7 16.4 23.9 22.0
CIS 6,242 18.3 8.9 31.3 12.0

14 December debate

Who do you believe has won the debate?

Polling firm/Link Sample
size
Mariano Rajoy Pedro Sánchez
   
Atresmedia   28.8 33.7
CIS 6,242 26.1 26.9

 Spanish general election Results 2015 

Party Popular vote Seats
Votes % ±pp Won +/−
People’s Party (PP) 72,36,965 28.71 –16.33 123 –64
Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party (PSOE) 55,45,315 22 –6.76 90 –20
  52,12,711 20.68 New 69
Citizens–Party of the Citizenry (C’s) 35,14,528 13.94 New 40 40
United Left–Popular Unity in Common (IU–UPeC) 9,26,783 3.68 –1.81 2 –6
Republican Left of Catalonia–Catalonia Yes (ERC–CatSí) 6,01,782 2.39 1.33 9 6
Democracy and Freedom: Convergence–Democrats–Realignment (DL) 5,67,253 2.25 –0.36 8 –2
Basque Nationalist Party (EAJ/PNV) 3,02,316 1.2 –0.13 6 1
Animalist Party Against Mistreatment of Animals (PACMA) 2,20,369 0.87 0.45 0 ±0
Basque Country Unite (EH Bildu) 2,19,125 0.87 –0.50 2 –5
Union, Progress and Democracy (UPyD) 1,55,153 0.62 –4.08 0 –5
Canarian Coalition–Canarian Nationalist Party (CC–PNC) 81,917 0.32 –0.27 1 –1
Us–Galician Candidacy (Nós) 70,863 0.28 –0.48 0 –2
Democratic Union of Catalonia (unio.cat)[d] 65,388 0.26 –1.30 0 –6
Vox (Vox) 58,114 0.23 New 0 ±0
Zero Cuts–Green Group (Recortes Cero–GV) 48,675 0.19 New 0 ±0
More for Majorca (Més) 33,877 0.13 ±0.00 0 ±0
Communist Party of the Peoples of Spain (PCPE) 31,179 0.12 0.01 0 ±0
Yes to the Future (GBai) 30,642 0.12 –0.05 0 –1
  1,00,226 0.4 0 ±0
Blank ballots 1,88,132 0.75 –0.62  
Total 2,52,11,313 100   350 ±0
Valid votes 2,52,11,313 99.11 0.4  
Invalid votes 2,27,219 0.89 –0.40
Votes cast / turnout 2,54,38,532 69.67 0.73
Abstentions 1,10,73,316 30.33 –0.73
Registered voters 3,65,11,848  

24-octtttttt 24-occcttttttttt-1

Vote share
Pary Votes
PP 28.71%
PSOE 22.00%
Podemos 20.68%
C's 13.94%
IU–UPeC 3.67%
ERC–CatSí 2.39%
DL 2.25%
EAJ/PNV 1.20%
EH Bildu 0.87%
CC–PNC 0.32%
Others 3.22%
Blank ballots 0.75%
Parliamentary seats
PP 35.14%
PSOE 25.71%
Podemos 19.71%
C's 11.43%
ERC–CatSí 2.57%
DL 2.29%
EAJ/PNV 1.71%
IU–UPeC 0.57%
EH Bildu 0.57%
CC–PNC 0.29%

Belarusian Parliamentary Election​​ 2019 Voting Results Candidates Live

Belarusian Parliamentary Election​​ 2019 Voting Results Candidates Live

Belarusian Parliamentary Election​ Dates 2019

Belarusian Parliamentary Election​ Date: 17 November 2019. 

Parliamentary elections are scheduled to be held in Belarus on 17 November 2019. Parliamentary elections were required to be held no later than 6 September 2020. However, in his annual address to the nation on 19 April 2019, President Alexander Lukashenko announced that they would be held in 2019. Lukashenko suggested Sunday 7 November, October Revolution Day, as a possible date.


Belarusian Parliamentary election Voting Live 2019

  1. An estimated 27.5% of voters turned out during the four days of early voting ahead of the 17 November parliamentary elections in Belarus, according to the Central Election Commission (CEC) of Belarus.
  2. According to the CEC, 26.14% of voters cast their ballots in Brest Oblast, 29.43% in Vitebsk Oblast, 29.96% in Gomel Oblast, 27.24% in Grodno Oblast, 28.65% in Minsk Oblast, 29.48% in Mogilev Oblast. Turnout in Minsk made up 23.05%.The voter register includes almost 6.9 million citizens.Early voting kicked off on 12 November to last through 16 November.
  3.  65.5% of candidates standing in Belarus parliamentary elections affiliated with political parties.
  4. Nearly 4,500 national observers accredited for Belarus' parliamentary elections.
  5. Over 450 CIS observers accredited to monitor parliamentary elections in Belarus

The Electoral system of Belarusian

The 110 members of the House of Representatives are elected from single-member constituencies by first-past-the-post voting.


Belarusian Parties and leaders

 

Name of Party

Name of Leader

 
 

Communist Party of Belarus (KPB)

Igor Karpenko

 

Liberal Democratic Party (LDPB)

Oleg Gaidukevich

 

Republican Party of Labour and Justice (RPTS)

Vasil Zadnyaprany

 

United Civic Party of Belarus (UCP)

Anatoly Lebedko

 

Belarusian Patriotic Party (BPP)

Nikolai Ulakhovich

 

BPF Party (BPF)

Ryhor Kastusiou

 

Belarusian Left Party "A Just World"

Sergey Kalyakin

 

Belarusian Social Democratic Party (Assembly) (BSDP)

Irina Veshtard

 

Belarusian Party "The Greens" (BPS)

Aleh Novikaŭ

 

Belarusian Social Democratic Assembly (BSDH)

Stanislav Shushkevich

 

Republican Party (RP)

Uladzimir Belazor

 

Belarusian Socialist Sporting Party (BSSP)

Vladimir Alexandrovich

 

Belarusian past election results 

Party

Votes

Seats

Communist Party of Belarus

380,770

8

Liberal Democratic Party

218,081

1

Republican Party of Labour and Justice

147,378

3

United Civic Party

111,227

1

Belarusian Patriotic Party

111,045

3

BPF Party

88,511

0

Belarusian Left Party "A Just World"

72,185

0

Belarusian Social Democratic Party (Assembly)

66,381

0

Belarusian Green Party

9,038

0

Independents

3,445,562

94

Against all

491,986

Invalid/blank votes

69,707

Total

5,211,871

110

Registered voters/turnout

6,978,490

Poland Muslim Population Percentage 2019 By City Demographics Religion

Poland Muslim Population Percentage 2019 By City Demographics Religion

A continuous presence of Islam in Poland began in the 14th century. From this time it was primarily associated with the Tatars, many of whom settled in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth while continuing their traditions and religious beliefs. The first significant non-Tatar groups of Muslims arrived in Poland in the 1970s.


Today, around 0.1% of the population in Poland is Muslim. The majority of Muslims in Poland are Sunni
Although Muslims make up only around 35,000 of a 38 million population, Poles believe that their number is actually 2.6 million, which would make the Polish Muslim population one of the largest in the European Union after France, Germany and the UK.
Also People in Poland believe that the number of Muslims in the country will grow to up to 13% by 2020.

The demographics of Poland constitute all demographic features of the population of Poland, including population density, ethnicity, education level, health of the populace, economic status, religious affiliations and other aspects of the population.Ethnically, Poland is a very homogeneous country, with 96.7% of population being Polish. 

A number of censuses have assessed this data, including a national census in 2002, and a survey by the Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights (HFHR), which confirmed there are numerous autochthonous ethnic groups in Poland. Estimates by INTEREG and Eurominority present a similar demographic picture of Poland but they provide estimates only for the most numerous of these ethnic groups.

Poland is aging rapidly. In 1950, the median age was 25.8: half of the Polish population was younger, half older. Today it is 38.2. If current trends continue, it will be 51 by 2050. As the population is aging, it has also started to decline mainly due to low birth rates and continued emigration which is impacting the economy. The number of children born in Polish families (TFR of 1.31, down from 2 in 1990) is one of the lowest in Eastern Europe.

 


Polish Poland demographics Population by Religion

Region

Population

Catholic

87.20%

Orthodox

1.30%

Protestant

0.40%

Other

0.40%

Islam 0.1%

Unspecified

10.80%

 


Immigrant Population divided by Region

Citizenship

Census 2011[15]

%

Poland

9,903,268

91.6

 Albania

480,824

4.45

 Bulgaria

75,915

0.7

 Romania

46,523

0.43

 Pakistan

34,177

0.31

 Georgia

27,400

0.25

 Ukraine

17,006

0.16

 United Kingdom

15,386

0.14

 Cyprus

14,446

0.13

 Poland

14,145

0.13

 Russia

13,807

0.12

 India

11,333

0.1

 Bangladesh

11,076

0.1

 Germany

10,778

0.09

 Egypt

10,455

0.09

 Moldova

10,391

0.09

 Philippines

9,804

0.09

Other

108,436

1

Total

10,815,197

100


Polish Poland demographics Population by Race

Polish 98%, other 2%; note: the Polish government states there are no ethnic divisions in Poland


Polish Population by City
.

S.No.

Name

Adm.

Population   Estimate 31/12/2015

1

Warszawa

MAZ

1,744,351

2

Kraków

MAL

761,069

3

Lódz

LOD

700,982

4

Wroclaw

DOL

635,759

5

Poznan

WIE

542,348

6

Gdansk

POM

462,249

7

Szczecin

ZAC

405,657

8

Bydgoszcz

KUJ

355,645

9

Lublin

LUB

340,727

Spanish general Election​ 2019 Voting Results Candidates Live

Spanish general Election​ 2019 Voting Results Candidates Live

Spanish general Election Dates 2019

Spanish general Election Date: 10 November 2019 

Spanish general Election​ 2019 Voting Results Candidates Live Details can be found here. The November 2019 Spanish general election will be held on Sunday, 10 November 2019, to elect the 14th Cortes Generales of the Kingdom of Spain. All 350 seats in the Congress of Deputies will be up for election, as well as 208 of 266 seats in the Senate.

The election will be held as provided under article 99.5 of the Spanish Constitution, as a result of the failure in government formation negotiations after Pedro Sánchez's failed investiture voting on 23–25 July 2019. On 17 September 2019, King Felipe VI declined to propose any candidate for investiture ahead of the 23 September deadline as a result of the lack of agreement between parties, with a new general election being scheduled for 10 November. The failure in PSOE–Unidas Podemos negotiations prompted former Podemos founder Íñigo Errejón to turn his regional Más Madrid platform—which had obtained a remarkable result in the 26 May Madrilenian regional election—into a national alliance under the newly-created brand of Más País, comprising a number of regional parties and former Podemos and United Left allies, such as Coalició Compromís, Equo or Chunta Aragonesista.


Spanish general Election Voting Live 2019

1Spain likely to return to the polls in November after-party talks fail.

2. Spanish King Asks Whether It’s Election Time Again for Sanchez.

3. Spanish General Election Candidates Clash over Catalonia.

  • Spanish voters are heading back to the polls on Sunday (10 November) for the fourth general election in less than four years

Spain Important Political Information Updates

 

  •  

The Electoral system of Spanish

The Spanish Cortes Generales is envisaged as an imperfect bicameral system. The Congress of Deputies has greater legislative power than the Senate, having the ability to vote confidence in or withdraw it from a Prime Minister and to override Senate vetoes by an absolute majority of votes. Nonetheless, the Senate possesses a few exclusive, yet limited in number functions—such as its role in the constitutional amendment—which are not subject to the Congress' override. Voting for the Cortes Generales is on the basis of universal suffrage, which comprises all nationals over eighteen and in full enjoyment of their political rights. Additionally, Spaniards abroad are required to apply for voting before being permitted to vote, a system known as "begged" or expat vote (Spanish: Voto Rogado).


Spanish Parties and leaders

 

Name of The Party Name of The Leader
PSOE Pedro Sánchez
PP Pablo Casado
Cs Albert Rivera
Unidas Podemos Pablo Iglesias
Vox Santiago Abascal
ERC–Sobiranistes Oriol Junqueras

Spanish election results 

 

Party

Seats

Last

PSOE

120

123

PP

88

66

Vox

52

24

Podemos

35

42

Ciudadanos

10

57

 

Romanian Presidential Election​ 2019 Voting Results Candidates Live

Romanian Presidential Election​ 2019 Voting Results Candidates Live

Romanian Presidential Election Dates 2019

Romanian Presidential Election Date: 10 November 2019 

Presidential elections will be held in Romania on 10 November 2019, with a possible second round on 24 November 2019. President Klaus Iohannis who was elected in 2014, is eligible for re-election.

Romania elects on a national level a head of state – the president – and a legislature. The president is elected for a five-year term by the people (after a change from four-year terms after the 2004 election). The Romanian Parliament (Parlamentul României) has two chambers. The Chamber of Deputies (Camera Deputaţilor) has currently 329 members (after the last legislative elections), elected for a four-year term by party-list proportional representation on closed lists. The Senate (Senatul) has currently 136 members (after the last legislative elections), elected for a four-year term by party-list proportional on closed lists.representation

Romania has a multi-party system, with numerous parties in which no one party often has a chance of gaining power alone, and parties must work with each other to form coalition governments.

On 25 November 2007, for the first time, Romanians elected their representatives to the European Parliament.

Romania Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2019


Romanian Presidential Election Voting Live 2019

1. Romania presidential elections 2019: New poll shows the actor in front of PM, the opposition party leader.

2. Romania’s Government Is Toppled in No-Confidence Vote.

3. Romania presidential elections 2019: Eight presidential candidates earn more than Romania’s president

 


The Electoral system of Romania

The President is elected in a two-round system for a five-year term. If one candidate obtains a majority of 50%+1 of all registered voters in the first round, he or she is declared the winner. If none of the candidates achieves this, then a run-off is held between the two contenders with the top scores in the first round. The candidate who obtains any majority of votes in the run-off is declared the winner.

The term of the president is five years. Between 1992 and 2004 the term was of four years but was increased following the 2003 Constitutional referendum. One person can serve a maximum of two terms, that may be consecutive.

In order to be able to run for the Office of President a candidate must fulfil the following conditions: be a Romanian citizen, be at least 35 years of age (at least on the day of the election), and not have held the office for two terms since 1992, when the 1991 Constitution took effect.


Romania Parties and leaders

 

Name of The Party Name of The Leader
Independent Klaus Iohannis
PSD Viorica Dăncilă
USR Dan Barna
Independent Mircea Diaconu
PMP Theodor Paleologu
UDMR Kelemen Hunor

 


Romania past election results 

 

Candidate Party First-round Second round
Votes % Votes %
Klaus Iohannis Christian Liberal Alliance (PNL–PDL) 2,881,406 30.37 6,288,769 54.43
Victor Ponta PSD–UNPR–PC Alliance 3,836,093 40.44 5,264,383 45.56
Călin Popescu-Tăriceanu Independent 508,572 5.36  
Elena Udrea PMP–PNȚCD Alliance 493,376 5.20
Monica Macovei Independent 421,648 4.44
Dan Diaconescu People's Party – Dan Diaconescu 382,526 4.03
Corneliu Vadim Tudor Greater Romania Party 349,416 3.68
Hunor Kelemen Democratic Alliance of Hungarians in Romania 329,727 3.47
Teodor Meleșcanu Independent 104,131 1.09
Zsolt Szilágyi Hungarian People's Party of Transylvania 53,146 0.56
Gheorghe Funar Independent 45,405 0.47
William Brînză Romanian Ecologist Party 43,194 0.45
Constantin Rotaru Socialist Alternative Party 28,805 0.30
Mirel Mircea Amariței PRODEMO Party 7,895 0.08
Invalid/blank votes 237,761 166,111
Total 9,723,232 100 11,719,344 100
Registered voters/turnout 18,284,066 53.17 18,280,994 64.10

Gibraltar general Election 2019 Voting Live

Gibraltar general Election 2019 Voting Live

Gibraltar general Election Dates 2019

Gibraltar general Election Date: 13 October 2019 

The Gibraltar general election of 2019 to elect all 17 members to the 4th Gibraltar Parliament is scheduled to take place on Thursday 17 October 2019. Chief Minister Fabian Picardo announced the date of the election on Monday 16 September 2019.


Gibraltar general Election Voting Live 2019 

1. BREAKING: SURPRISE GIBRALTAR ELECTIONS CALLED FOR OCTOBER 17 BY CHIEF MINISTER FABIAN PICARDO.

2. Gibraltar election CALLED: Parliament dissolved – 'Need strong leadership for Brexit'.

3. GSLP reveals its Election Manifesto ahead of Gibraltar elections.


The Electoral system of Gibraltar 

Under section 38(2) of the Gibraltar Constitution Order 2006, the parliament must be dissolved by the Governor four years after its first meeting following the last election (unless the Chief Minister advises the Governor to dissolve parliament sooner). Under section 37 of the Constitution, writs for a general election must be issued within thirty days of the dissolution and the general election must then be held no later than three months after the issuing of a writ. In October 2015, Chief Minister Fabian Picardo announced that the election would take place on 26 November. Following the British tradition, elections in Gibraltar conventionally take place on a Thursday.


Gibraltar general Parties and leaders

 

N/A


Gibraltar past election results 

Party Votes % +/– Seats % +/–
Alliance Gibraltar Socialist Labour Party 70,551 47.8 +13.6 7 41.2 ±0
Liberal Party of Gibraltar 30,399 20.6 +6.0 3 17.6 ±0
Total Alliance 100,950 68.4 +19.6 10 58.8 ±0
Gibraltar Social Democrats 46,545 31.6 -15.2 7 41.2 ±0
Total 147,495 100 17 100
 
Valid votes 15,578 94.6
Invalid/blank votes 897 5.4
Total votes cast 16,475 100
Registered voters/turnout 23,278 70.8
1 2 3 37