Australian PM Malcolm Turnbull Opinion Poll NewsPolls 2016 Approval rating

Australian PM Malcolm Turnbull Opinion Poll NewsPolls 2016 Approval rating

Turnbull, came to power last September, voters are upset by lack of progress bringing "jobs and growth" as promised at July's election.

The Newspoll, ( News Corp publications) Opinion Poll (Sample Size: 1629 voters)
Coaliation: 48 % (PM Malcolm Turnbull's party)
Labor: 52%

Turnbull's personal approval rating as Prime Minister  


Latest : 41% (down 2 % from last poll, and 18% down this year)

However, Opposition Leader Bill Shorten failed to capitalize and his approval rating simultaneously fell a point in the polls.

According to the survey

  1. The prime minister will need to prioritize creating jobs and stimulating economic growth once Parliament resumes in the New Year.
  2. 36% of voters believe the economy should be Turnbull's top priority
  3. Fixing the budget is ranked as most important to 16% of voters.
  4. Prime minister's net satisfaction rating sits at -23 points, with satisfaction at 32 percent but dissatisfaction at 55 percent,
  5. Shorten's net satisfaction rating dropped two points to -17 points, six points better off than Turnbull.

Australia Latest Opinion Poll NewsPolls 2016, Brexit effect on Australia elections, Australia opinion poll, Malcolm Turnbull , Brexit

Australia Latest Opinion Poll NewsPolls 2016, Brexit effect on Australia elections, Australia opinion poll, Malcolm Turnbull , Brexit 

After the previous two Newspolls showed the coalition and the Labor opposition were neck-and-neck in the two-party preferred vote, the latest survey of almost 1,800 Australians showed the government's primary vote has risen to a 14-week high to propel it ahead in the two-party vote — 51 percent to 49 percent.

According to the Newspoll, the Brexit news affected the minor parties most of all, with support for the Greens dropping to 9 percent of the primary vote — its lowest level of support in almost three years — while independents also fell across the board.

Meanwhile Andrew Walter, Professor of International Relations at the University of Melbourne said the government would likely be the beneficiary of the Brexit vote, as "disenchanted" voters who planned on voting independent might now switch their vote back to a major party to ensure future stability.

According to the Newspoll, 65 percent of the respondents have "locked in" their vote, but 35 percent could be swayed in the lead-up to the vote on Saturday.

A new, Australian-Institute commissioned poll found that Australians were split as to which party would deliver more jobs and growth, a key slogan on the Turnbull campaign, with 33 percent trusting the government more, while 31 percent chose Labor, despite it not being that party's slogan.

Australians will head to the polls on July 2.