Italian Constitutional referendum Results Live 2016 Exit polls by regions provinces Dates Opinion Poll Voter turnout Issues December 4

Last Modified: December 5, 2016 at 6:18 am

Italian Constitutional referendum Results Voting 2016 Live by regions provinces Dates Opinion Poll Voter turnout Issues December 4

Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, set to resign after Italians Vote No for the referendum to change country’s 68-year-old Constitution and the shape and size of the national government.

Voter Turnout: 68.33% (nearly 70%)

Percentuale votanti
ITALIA Comuni pervenuti: 7.985 su 7.998 68,44
ESTERO    
IN COMPLESSO    
Regione % Votanti Sezioni (*) pervenute Sezioni (*) Totali Voti SI Voti NO % Voti SI % Voti NO
PIEMONTE   2409.000 4.822 482.910 608937.000 44,23 55,77
VALLE D'AOSTA 71.000 86.000 151.000 14.967 20.261 42,49 57,51
LOMBARDIA   2.544 9.222 604.758 808.407 42,79 57,21
TRENTINO-ALTO ADIGE 72,22 389.000 1.015 116.101 80.405 59,08 40,92
VENETO 76.670 2.847 4.738 637.117 1.012.438 38,62 61,38
FRIUU-VENEZIA GIUUA 72,5 989.000 1.370 182.961 287.471 38,89 61,11
LIGURIA 69,73 1.494 1.790 280.064 421.829 39,90 60,10
EMILIA-ROMAGNA 75,93 2.710 4513.000 724.994 718.203 50,24 49,76
TOSCANA 74,45 2.809 3.958 766.449 688.301 52,69 47,31
UMBRIA 73,43 459.000 1.007 102.506 108301.000 48,63 51,37
MARCHE   1.054 1.578 252.450 306.082 45,20 54.800
LAZIO 69,18 3.543 5.277 745.750 1.216.022 38,01 61,99
ABRUZZO   740.000 1.639 102.166 179.700 36,25 63,75
MOUSE   140.000 393.000 20.993 30.607 40,68 59,32
CAMPANIA 58,87 2.845 5.826 395.339 874.245 31,14 68,86
PUGLIA 61,72 2.132 4.022 333.964 FA4 437 32,79 67,21
BASIUCATA 62,86 232.000 681.000 30.115 54.742 35,49 64,51
CALABRIA 54,44 1.116 2.414 119.280 245.957 32.660 67,34
SICIUA   2.620 5.300 308.843 753.120 29,08 70,92
SARDEGNA   713.000 1.835 83.323 223.150 27,19 72,81
               
ITALIA   32.129 61.551 6.362.256 9.400.273 40,36 59,64
ESTERO              
IN COMPLESSO       6.305.050 9.323 40,35 59.650

Italian constitutional referendum Resuts Exit Polls Live 2016

  1. Italian PM says he takes full responsibility and would resign.
  2. IPR exit poll results show gap growing even more. No = 59.1 Yes = 40.9
  3. Latest Exit Polls say NO ahead with 55% vs YES 45%. All Exit polls here.
  4. The Interior Ministry's website put the voter turnout at 68.33 per cent, indicating that the final turn out could be more than 70 per cent.
  5. Mr Renzi  is widely expected to resign, but some of his allies have urged him to stay in power regardless of the result.

Italian constitutional referendum Voting Live 2016

  1. Nearly 20 % eligible voters voted by noon – higher turnout than the 2014 European elections.
  2. Voter turnout low across South Italy, where opposition to Mr Renzi’s reforms strongest.
  3. Turnout highest in the north Italy, with Emilia-Romagna, traditionally a bastion of the left.
  4. 51 million Italians are entitled to vote, including 4 million expats.
  5. Polls opened at 7am (0600 GMT) and were scheduled to close at 2200 GMT.
  6. Final results expected by early hours of Monday.
  7. PM Matteo Renzi urged 47 million of eligible voters to say "yes" for constitutional referendum, which is the bellwether of public support for his center-left Democratic Party.
  8. PM Renzi vowed to step down if the vote is negative. Italy's anti-establishment Five Star Movement has been campaigning against prime minister’s constitutional reforms.
  9. Opinion polls indicate high chances of voters voting "NO" and rejecting the referendum.

Italian constitutional referendum Result 2016 Live

Choice Votes %
Yes Yes   0.00%
 No   0.00%
Invalid/blank votes   0.00%
Total   0.00%
Registered voters/turnout   0.00%

Italian constitutional referendum Results by Regions 2016

Region Yes Yes
(votes)
 No
(votes)
Yes Yes
(%)
 No
(%)
Abruzzo        
Aosta Valley        
Apulia        
Basilicata        
Calabria        
Campania        
Emilia-Romagna        
Friuli-Venezia Giulia        
Lazio        
Liguria        
Lombardy        
Marche        
Molise        
Piedmont        
Sardinia        
Sicily        
Tuscany        
Trentino-Alto Adige        
Umbria        
Veneto      

Italian constitutional referendum Resuts Live 2016 

Acc to The Interior Ministry's website Latest Counting Results.

Sections received Italian: 35,539 of 61,551

Yes: 40.45%

No: 59.55%

Italian constitutional referendum Resuts Exit Polls Live 2016

  1. Italian PM says he takes full responsibility and would resign
  2. IPR exit poll results show gap growing even more. No = 59.1 Yes = 40.9
  3. Polling Agency Yes NO
    IPR: 41 59
    SKY: 43 57
    TECNE: 42 58
    EMG: 43 57
  4. Latest Exit Polls say NO ahead with 55% vs YES 45%
  5. The Interior Ministry's website put the voter turnout at 68.33 per cent, indicating that the final turn out could be more than 70 per cent.
  6. Mr Renzi  is widely expected to resign, but some of his allies have urged him to stay in power regardless of the result.

Italian constitutional referendum Voting Live 2016

  1. Nearly 20 % eligible voters voted by noon – higher turnout than the 2014 European elections.
  2. Voter turnout low across South Italy, where opposition to Mr Renzi’s reforms strongest.
  3. Turnout highest in the north Italy, with Emilia-Romagna, traditionally a bastion of the left.
  4. 51 million Italians are entitled to vote, including 4 million expats.
  5. Polls opened at 7am (0600 GMT) and were scheduled to close at 2200 GMT.
  6. Final results expected by early hours of Monday.
  7. PM Matteo Renzi urged 47 million of eligible voters to say "yes" for constitutional referendum, which is the bellwether of public support for his center-left Democratic Party.
  8. PM Renzi vowed to step down if the vote is negative. Italy's anti-establishment Five Star Movement has been campaigning against prime minister’s constitutional reforms.
  9. Opinion polls indicate high chances of voters voting "NO" and rejecting the referendum.

Italian constitutional referendum Result 2016 Live

Choice Votes %
Yes Yes   0.00%
 No   0.00%
Invalid/blank votes   0.00%
Total   0.00%
Registered voters/turnout   0.00%

Italian constitutional referendum Results by Regions 2016

Region Yes Yes
(votes)
 No
(votes)
Yes Yes
(%)
 No
(%)
Abruzzo        
Aosta Valley        
Apulia        
Basilicata        
Calabria        
Campania        
Emilia-Romagna        
Friuli-Venezia Giulia        
Lazio        
Liguria        
Lombardy        
Marche        
Molise        
Piedmont        
Sardinia        
Sicily        
Tuscany        
Trentino-Alto Adige        
Umbria        
Veneto      


What are Italians voting on?

 

The vote Sunday is on a constitutional referendum presented by Prime Minister Matteo Renzi that aims to slim down the country’s legislature, speed up lawmaking and attack the bureaucratic morass. Specifically, the overhaul would cut the number of senators by roughly two-thirds to 100, while allowing many bills to be approved by the lower house only. Mr. Renzi has argued that the referendum would give some stability to Italy, which has had 63 governments since the end of World War II.

Critics of the overhaul say the cost-cutting would be far less than what the government is claiming and would give too much power to prime ministers, eliminating important checks and balances.

 Opinion polling for the Italian constitutional referendum 2016

Date Polling Firm Total   Considering only Yes/No vote
YesYes No None / Don't know Lead YesYes No Lead
         
9 Nov 2016 Index Research 37.3 40.7 22.0 3.4 47.8 52.2 4.4
9 Nov 2016 Istituto Ixè 37.0 40.0 23.0 3.0 48.0 52.0 4.0

What are the consequences of a yes vote?

Mr. Renzi and his government would remain in power. In any case, Mr. Renzi has vowed to change a law passed in 2015 that would give the winning party a strong majority through the allocation of “bonus seats.” Elections would most likely be held in 2018, when the current Parliament’s term is scheduled to end.

What are the consequences of a no vote?

Mr. Renzi would most likely resign. If he did, President Sergio Mattarella would consult with the political parties and could decide to form a caretaker government, possibly consisting of technocrats, or call early elections. Mr. Renzi might also choose not to resign, though that appears unlikely, given his statements in recent weeks.

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