Peruvian parliamentary election dates and Voting Live 2020 

 Peruvian parliamentary election dates and Voting Live 2020 

 Peruvian parliamentary election Dates 2020

 Peruvian parliamentary election​ Date: 26 January 2020​ 

Early parliamentary elections are scheduled to be held in Peru on 26 January 2020. The elections were called after President Martín Vizcarra dissolved the Congress of the Republic on 30 September 2019.

 


 Peruvian parliamentary election dates and Voting Live 2020 

  • The battle between Vizcarra’s cabinet and opposition-dominated Congress explained
  • A look at the context and mechanisms within Peru's constitution
  • Nearly 90 percent of Peruvians want members of Congress to step down.

 

The Electoral system of Peruvian  

The 130 members of Congress are elected in 25 multi-member constituencies using open list proportional representation.

 


Peruvian parliamentary election Party and candidate 

Name of Candidate

Name of Party

George Forsyth

We Are Peru

Kenji Fujimori

Popular Force

Keiko Fujimori

Popular Force

Julio Guzmán

Purple Party

Verónika Mendoza

New Peru

Salvador del Solar

Peruvians for Change


Peruvian Elections Results

#To Be Announced

 


 Past Peruvian Elections Results 

Party

Vote

%

Seats

Popular Force

4,431,077

36.34

73

Peruvians for Change

2,007,710

16.47

18

Broad Front

1,700,052

13.94

20

Alliance for the Progress of Peru

1,125,682

9.23

9

Popular Alliance

1,013,735

8.31

5

Popular Action

877,734

7.2

5

Direct Democracy

528,301

4.33

0

Possible Peru

286,980

2.35

0

Hope Front

139,634

1.15

0

Order Party

68,474

0.56

0

Developing Peru

14,663

0.12

0

Invalid/blank votes

 

Total

12,194,042

100

130

Registered voters/turnout

22,901,954

 

Sammarinese General Election​ dates and Voting Live 2019 

Sammarinese General Election​ dates and Voting Live 2019 

Sammarinese General Election​ Dates 2019

Sammarinese General Election​ Date: 8 December 2019 

General elections will be held in San Marino on 8 December 2019. All 60 seats in the Grand and General Council 31 seats needed for a majority.

General elections were held in San Marino on 20 November 2016 and 4 December 2016.The San Marino First alliance received a plurality of the popular vote, but fell short of a majority in the Grand and General Council, initially being allocated 25 seats.As no single bloc had won a majority of seats, a runoff was held on 4 December 2016 between the top two coalitions, San Marino First and Adesso.sm, to determine the winner of the majority prize. The second round saw Adesso.sm win with 58% of the vote, resulting in seats being reallocated and the winning alliance receiving 35 seats.

 


Sammarinese General Election Voting Live 2019 

What You Need To Know For Tuesday's Elections in LA County.

 


 

The Electoral system of Sammarinese  

The 60 members of the Grand and General Council are elected by proportional representation, with seats allocated using the d'Hondt method. The electoral threshold is calculated by multiplying the number of parties running in the elections by 0.4, with a maximum possible threshold of 3.5%.

If no party receives a majority, or the two largest parties are unable to form a coalition government within thirty days of the elections, a runoff election will be held between the two most popular coalitions, with the winner receiving a seat bonus to give them a majority. It is the first time the facultative second round will be applied following its approval in a June 2019 referendum.

 


Sammarinese Elections Results

Coalition

Party

First round

Second round

Votes

%

Seats[a]

Votes

%

Seats[b]

+/–

Sammarinese Christian Democratic Party

5,993

33.35

21

 

 

 

 

Tomorrow in Motion

RETE Movement

3,276

18.23

11

 

 

 

 

Domani Motus Liberi

1,112

6.19

4

 

 

 

 

Direct coalition votes

57

0.32

0

 

 

 

 

Total

4,445

24.73

15

 

 

 

 

Libera

2,964

16.49

10

 

 

 

 

Noi per la Repubblica

2,359

13.13

8

 

 

 

 

Future Republic

1,850

10.29

6

 

 

 

 

Ēlego

361

2.01

0

 

 

 

 

Invalid/blank votes

1,262

 

Total

19,234

100

60

 

 

 

 

Registered voters/turnout

34,511

55.73

 

 

Source: State Secretariat for Internal Affairs and Public Function


 Past Sammarinese Elections Results 

Coalition

Party

First round

Second round

Votes

%

Seats[a]

Votes

%

Seats[b]

+/–

San Marino First

Sammarinese Christian Democratic Party

4,752

24.46

16

6,889

42.08

10

–11

Socialist Party

1,496

7.7

5

3

–4

Party of Socialists and Democrats

1,392

7.17

4

3

–7

Sammarinese (NS–SsC)

414

2.13

0

0

Direct coalition votes

44

0.23

0

0

Total

8,098

41.68

25

16

–22

Adesso.sm

Democratic Socialist Left (SU–PR–LabDem)

2,352

12.11

8

9,482

57.92

14

9

Future Republic (AP–UR)

1,865

9.6

6

11

6

Civic 10

1,800

9.27

6

10

6

Direct coalition votes

88

0.45

0

0

Total

6,105

31.43

20

35

21

Democracy in Motion

RETE Movement

3,561

18.33

12

 

8

4

Democratic Movement – San Marino Together

872

4.49

3

1

New

Direct coalition votes

70

0.36

0

0

Total

4,503

23.18

15

9

4

List of Free People

412

2.12

0

0

New

Sammarinese Democratic Revival

309

1.59

0

0

New

Invalid/blank votes

849

653

Total

20,276

100

60

17,024

100

60

0

Registered voters/turnout

33,985

59.66

33,985

50.09

Source: Segreteria di Stato Libertas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Italian Senate election 2018 voting live

 Italian Senate election 2018 Results Voting Live

Italian Senate election Dates 2018

Italian Senate election Date: 31 December 2018

The Senate of the Republic (Italian: Senato della Repubblica) is a house of the bicameral Italian Parliament (the other being the Chamber of Deputies). The two houses together form a perfect bicameral system, meaning they perform identical functions, but do so separately. Pursuant to Articles 57, 58, and 59 of the Italian Constitution, the Senate has a variable number of members, of which 309 are elected from Italian constituencies, 6 from Italian citizens living abroad, and a small number (currently 5) are senators for life (senatori a vita), either appointed or ex officio. It was established in its current form on 8 May 1948, but previously existed during the Kingdom of Italy as Senato del Regno(Senate of the Kingdom), itself a continuation of the Senato Subalpino (Subalpine Senate) of Sardinia established on 8 May 1848.

Italian Senate 2018 Voting live


Italian Senate Voting Live 2018 

1.The Senate consists of 315 elected members, and as of 2016 five senators for life. The elected senators must be over 40 years of age and are elected by Italian citizens aged 25 or older.

2.The Senate (except for six senators who represent Italians residing abroad and the senators for life) is elected on a regional basis. The 309 senators are assigned to each region proportionally according to their population. However, Article 57 of the Constitution provides that no region can have fewer than seven senators representing it, except for the Aosta Valley (which has one) and Molise (which has two).


Electoral system of Italy 

The new electoral law was supported by the Democratic Party and his government ally Popular Alternative, but also by the opposition parties Forza Italia, Lega Nord and Liberal Popular Alliance. Despite many protests from the Five Star Movement, the Democratic and Progressive Movement, Italian Left and Brothers of Italy, the electoral law was approved on 12 October by the Chamber of Deputies with 375 votes in favour and 215 against, and on 26 October by the Senate with 214 votes against 61.


Candidates for Italian Senate election

N/A


Italy Parties and leaders 

Democratic Party,Five Star Movement,Forward Italy, Popular Alternative


Italy past election results 

Coalition Party Votes % Seats
  Pier Luigi Bersani: Italy. Common Good   Democratic Party 8,400,255 27.43 105
  Left Ecology Freedom 912,374 2.97 7
  Democratic Centre 163,427 0.53 0
  The Megaphone – Crocetta List 138,581 0.45 1
  Italian Socialist Party 57,688 0.18 0
  Moderates 14,358 0.04 0
Total 9,686,683 31.63 113
  Silvio Berlusconi: Centre-right coalition   The People of Freedom 6,829,373 22.30 98
  Lega Nord 1,328,555 4.33 17
  Brothers of Italy 590,083 1.92 0
  The Right 221,112 0.72 0
  Pensioners' Party 123,458 0.40 0
  Great South 122,100 0.39 1
  Moderates in Revolution 69,649 0.22 0
  Party of Sicilians-MPA 48,618 0.15 0
  People's Agreement 24,979 0.08 0
  Popular Construction 21,685 0.07 0
  Stop Taxes 19,298 0.06 0
  Free for a Fair Italy 6,769 0.02 0
Total 9,405,679 30.71 116
  Beppe Grillo: Five Star Movement 7,285,850 23.79 54
  Mario Monti: With Monti for Italy 2,797,486 9.13 18
  Antonio Ingroia: Civil Revolution 549,987 1.79 0
  Oscar Giannino: Act to Stop the Decline 278,396 0.90 0

Italy Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 by City Immigrants

Italy Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 Italy Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017

Italy has 60,656,000 inhabitants according to the calculations current as of January 1, 2017  Its population density, at 201 inhabitants per square kilometre (520/sq mi), is higher than that of most Western European countries. However the distribution of the population is widely uneven. The most densely populated areas are the Po Valley (that accounts for almost half of the national population) and the metropolitan areas of Rome and Naples, while vast regions such as the Alps and Apennines highlands, the plateaus of Basilicata and the island of Sardinia are very sparsely populated. The population of Italy almost doubled during the twentieth century, but the pattern of growth was extremely uneven due to large-scale internal migration from the rural South to the industrial cities of the North, a phenomenon which happened as a consequence of the Italian economic miracle of the 1950-60s. In addition, after centuries of net emigration, from the 1980s Italy has experienced large-scale immigration for the first time in modern history. According to the Italian government, there were an estimated 5,000,073 foreign nationals resident in Italy.

 

 

Italy demographics Population by Religion

Religions in Italy

Christianity (83.3%)

  No religion (12.4%)

  Islam (3.7%)

  Buddhism (0.2%)

  Hinduism (0.1%)

  Other religions (0.3%)

 

 


 Italy demographics Population by Immigrants

Immigration to Italy

Europe (50.8%)

 Africa (22.1%)

 Asia (18.8%)

America (8.3%)

Oceania (0.1%)

 


 Italy demographics Population by Race

.

Rank

Ethnicity or Nationality

Share of Italian Population

1

Italian

92.00%

2

Romanian

1.80%

3

Maghrebi and/or Arabic

1.10%

4

Albanian

0.80%

5

Han Chinese

0.30%

6

Ukrainian

0.30%

 

Italy Population by City
.

Rank

City

Population

1

Roma (Rome)

2,648,843

2

Milano (Milan)

1,305,591

3

Napoli (Naples)

1,046,987

4

Torino (Turin)

921,485

5

Palermo

689,349

6

Genova (Genoa)

655,704

7

Bologna

385,813

8

Firenze (Florence)

381,762

9

Catania

341,685

10

Bari

335,647

11

Venezia (Venice)

297,743

12

Messina

262,524

13

Verona

254,146

14

Trieste

222,589

15

Padova (Padua)

213,072

16

Taranto

212,381

17

Brescia

190,059

18

Reggio di Calabria

179,829

19

Modena

174,686

20

Cagliari

173,564

21

Prato

168,683

22

Parma

167,685

23

Livorno (Leghorn)

164,371

24

Foggia

156,327

25

Perugia

152,379

26

Salerno

143,580

27

Ravenna

137,129

28

Ferrara

134,703

29

Rimini

129,720

30

Siracusa (Syracuse)

127,345

31

Sassari

121,455

32

Monza

119,420

33

Pescara

118,473

34

Bergamo

117,096

35

Latina

111,047

36

Terni

108,521

37

Vicenza

108,041

38

Forli

107,909

39

Trento (Trent)

103,269

40

Novara

102,327

Italian Local elections 2017 Results live Voting Opinion Exit poll Candidates

Italian Local elections 2017 Results live Voting Opinion Exit poll Candidates

Italian Local elections  schedule 2017
 

The 2017 Italian local elections will be held on Sunday 11 June. If necessary, a run-off vote will be held on Sunday 25 June. The term of mayors and councils will last 5 years, unless an early election is triggered.
In the autonomous regions of Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol and Aosta Valley the elections will be held on 7 May. The elections were characterized by a good performance of the Centre-right coalition and some important results of the Centre-left, which became the most voted coalition in this election with more than 37% of votes, while the Five Star Movement was excluded from the runoffs in all the most important cities .


Italian Local Elections Voting System Process Details 2017
 

Every comune with more than 15,000 inhabitants elects its mayor and city council with the same system.


Voters express a direct choice for the mayor or an indirect choice voting for one of the parties of the candidate's coalition. If no candidate receives a majority of votes, the top two candidates go to a second round two weeks later. The coalition of the elected mayor is guaranteed a majority of seats in the council with the attribution of extra seats. If the Mayor resigns, dies, lose a motion of confidence, or a majority of the municipal councillors step down at the same time, an early election (for the Mayor and for all municipal councillors) is called.
The City Council is elected at the same time as the mayor. Voters can vote for a list of candidates and can express up to two preferences for candidates of said list, provided they are selecting candidates of both genders. Seats are then attributed to parties proportionally, and for each party the candidates with the highest number of preferences are elected.
Comuni with a population of less than 15,000 elect their mayors with a plurality system. A mayoral candidate can be supported by only one list, and the list of the elected mayor gets a two-thirds majority of seats. Voters can express up to two preferences for candidates of the chosen list, provided they are selecting candidates of both genders. Seats are then attributed to the candidates with the highest number of preferences.


 

Italian Local elections  Parties and Coalitions Live 2017

 


Political force or alliance

Constituent lists Leader
Centre-left coalition Democratic Party Matteo Renzi
  Article 1 – MDP Roberto Speranza
  Popular Alternative Angelino Alfano
  Italian Socialist Party Riccardo Nencini
  Centrists for Europe Pier Ferdinando Casini
  Centre-left civic lists none
Centre-right coalition Forza Italia Silvio Berlusconi
  Lega Nord Matteo Salvini
  Us with Salvini  
  Brothers of Italy Giorgia Meloni
  Popular Alternative Angelino Alfano
  Union of the Centre Lorenzo Cesa
  Direction Italy Raffaele Fitto
  Centre-right civic lists none
Five Star Movement   Beppe Grillo
Left-wing coalition Italian Left Nicola Fratoianni
  Possible Giuseppe Civati
  Left-wing civic lists none

Italian Local elections  Results Live 2017

Party Political leaning Comuni
Centre-left coalition Centre-left 2
Centre-right coalition Centre-right 1
Five Star Movement Big tent[10] 0
Left-wing coalition Left-wing 0

Party Votes

 
Party votes in 145 main comuni:
Party %
Democratic Party 15.60%
Five Star Movement 8.70%
Forza Italia 6.80%
Lega Nord 6.70%
Italian Left 6.50%
Brothers of Italy 2.50%
Coalition Votes  
Coalition votes in 145 main comuni
Party %
Centre-left coalition 37.20%
Centre-right coalition 34.40%
Five Star Movement 9.40%
Left-wing coalition 7.00%

 

Italian Prime Minister Election 2018 Opinion Poll Exit Poll Winner,Italy general election opinion poll

Italian Prime Minister Election 2018 Opinion Poll Exit Poll Winner, Italy general election opinion poll

The next Italian general election is due to be held no later than 23 May 2018 and will be called following the dissolution or expiry of the term started on 29 April 2013.

Find more on Italian General Election 2018 Timetable Candidates Past Results

Opinion polling for Italian general election 2018

November Polls

Date Polling firm M5S PD FI LN SI FdI AP Others Lead
             
25–27 Nov EMG 29.9 31.0 10.5 13.1 3.5 4.2 3.5 3.8 1.1
17–19 Nov EMG 30.6 30.8 10.5 13.1 3.1 4.2 3.4 4.3 0.2
17 Nov Lorien 31.8 31.5 11.0 12.0 3.5 3.7 3.5 2.2 0.3
14–16 Nov SWG 27.8 32.0 11.8 12.9 3.4 4.0 3.2 4.9 4.2
10-12 Nov EMG 31.2 30.6 11.4 12.0 3.4 4.1 3.6 3.7 0.6
9–10 Nov SWG 27.3 32.8 12.4 12.6 3.2 3.6 3.3 4.8 5.5
7 Nov Lorien 31.8 31.6 11.8 12.3 3.5 3.8 3.2 2.1 0.2
4-6 Nov EMG 31.6 30.8 11.1 11.8 3.6 4.0 3.5 3.6 0.8
2–3 Nov SWG 27.2 32.7 11.6 12.2 3.2 3.9 3.2 6.0 5.5
2 Nov Ixè 29.1 33.4 9.5 13.4 3.7 3.2 2.4 5.3 4.3

In the run-up to the next Italian general election, various organisations have been carrying out opinion polling to gauge voting intention.

Date Polling firm M5S PD FI LN SI FdI AP Others Lead
19–20 Oct SWG 26.5 33.0 12.6 12.0 3.5 3.9 3.1 5.4 6.5
19 Oct Ixè 29.0 32.9 9.8 14.2 4.3 2.5 1.9 5.4 3.9

PD v. M5S

Date Polling firm PD M5S Lead
15–16 Oct 2016 EMG 46.8 53.2 6.4
15 Oct 2016 IPR 48.0 52.0 4.0

PD v. Centre-right

Date Polling firm PD CDx Lead
15–16 Oct 2016 EMG 53.3 46.7 6.6
15 Oct 2016 IPR 53.0 47.0 2.0

M5S v. Centre-right

Date Polling firm M5S CDx Lead
15–16 Oct 2016 EMG 58.3 41.7 16.6
15 Oct 2016 IPR 57.0 43.0 14.0

Three-way race

Date Polling firm PD CDx M5S Lead
15 Oct 2016 IPR 37.0 32.0 31.0 5.0
14–15 Oct 2016 Tecnè 35.0 34.0 31.0 1.0

Italian Constitutional referendum Results Live 2016 Exit polls by regions provinces Dates Opinion Poll Voter turnout Issues December 4

Italian Constitutional referendum Results Voting 2016 Live by regions provinces Dates Opinion Poll Voter turnout Issues December 4

Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, set to resign after Italians Vote No for the referendum to change country’s 68-year-old Constitution and the shape and size of the national government.

Voter Turnout: 68.33% (nearly 70%)

Percentuale votanti
ITALIA Comuni pervenuti: 7.985 su 7.998 68,44
ESTERO    
IN COMPLESSO    
Regione % Votanti Sezioni (*) pervenute Sezioni (*) Totali Voti SI Voti NO % Voti SI % Voti NO
PIEMONTE   2409.000 4.822 482.910 608937.000 44,23 55,77
VALLE D'AOSTA 71.000 86.000 151.000 14.967 20.261 42,49 57,51
LOMBARDIA   2.544 9.222 604.758 808.407 42,79 57,21
TRENTINO-ALTO ADIGE 72,22 389.000 1.015 116.101 80.405 59,08 40,92
VENETO 76.670 2.847 4.738 637.117 1.012.438 38,62 61,38
FRIUU-VENEZIA GIUUA 72,5 989.000 1.370 182.961 287.471 38,89 61,11
LIGURIA 69,73 1.494 1.790 280.064 421.829 39,90 60,10
EMILIA-ROMAGNA 75,93 2.710 4513.000 724.994 718.203 50,24 49,76
TOSCANA 74,45 2.809 3.958 766.449 688.301 52,69 47,31
UMBRIA 73,43 459.000 1.007 102.506 108301.000 48,63 51,37
MARCHE   1.054 1.578 252.450 306.082 45,20 54.800
LAZIO 69,18 3.543 5.277 745.750 1.216.022 38,01 61,99
ABRUZZO   740.000 1.639 102.166 179.700 36,25 63,75
MOUSE   140.000 393.000 20.993 30.607 40,68 59,32
CAMPANIA 58,87 2.845 5.826 395.339 874.245 31,14 68,86
PUGLIA 61,72 2.132 4.022 333.964 FA4 437 32,79 67,21
BASIUCATA 62,86 232.000 681.000 30.115 54.742 35,49 64,51
CALABRIA 54,44 1.116 2.414 119.280 245.957 32.660 67,34
SICIUA   2.620 5.300 308.843 753.120 29,08 70,92
SARDEGNA   713.000 1.835 83.323 223.150 27,19 72,81
               
ITALIA   32.129 61.551 6.362.256 9.400.273 40,36 59,64
ESTERO              
IN COMPLESSO       6.305.050 9.323 40,35 59.650

Italian constitutional referendum Resuts Exit Polls Live 2016

  1. Italian PM says he takes full responsibility and would resign.
  2. IPR exit poll results show gap growing even more. No = 59.1 Yes = 40.9
  3. Latest Exit Polls say NO ahead with 55% vs YES 45%. All Exit polls here.
  4. The Interior Ministry's website put the voter turnout at 68.33 per cent, indicating that the final turn out could be more than 70 per cent.
  5. Mr Renzi  is widely expected to resign, but some of his allies have urged him to stay in power regardless of the result.

Italian constitutional referendum Voting Live 2016

  1. Nearly 20 % eligible voters voted by noon – higher turnout than the 2014 European elections.
  2. Voter turnout low across South Italy, where opposition to Mr Renzi’s reforms strongest.
  3. Turnout highest in the north Italy, with Emilia-Romagna, traditionally a bastion of the left.
  4. 51 million Italians are entitled to vote, including 4 million expats.
  5. Polls opened at 7am (0600 GMT) and were scheduled to close at 2200 GMT.
  6. Final results expected by early hours of Monday.
  7. PM Matteo Renzi urged 47 million of eligible voters to say "yes" for constitutional referendum, which is the bellwether of public support for his center-left Democratic Party.
  8. PM Renzi vowed to step down if the vote is negative. Italy's anti-establishment Five Star Movement has been campaigning against prime minister’s constitutional reforms.
  9. Opinion polls indicate high chances of voters voting "NO" and rejecting the referendum.

Italian constitutional referendum Result 2016 Live

Choice Votes %
Yes Yes   0.00%
 No   0.00%
Invalid/blank votes   0.00%
Total   0.00%
Registered voters/turnout   0.00%

Italian constitutional referendum Results by Regions 2016

Region Yes Yes
(votes)
 No
(votes)
Yes Yes
(%)
 No
(%)
Abruzzo        
Aosta Valley        
Apulia        
Basilicata        
Calabria        
Campania        
Emilia-Romagna        
Friuli-Venezia Giulia        
Lazio        
Liguria        
Lombardy        
Marche        
Molise        
Piedmont        
Sardinia        
Sicily        
Tuscany        
Trentino-Alto Adige        
Umbria        
Veneto      

Italian constitutional referendum Resuts Live 2016 

Acc to The Interior Ministry's website Latest Counting Results.

Sections received Italian: 35,539 of 61,551

Yes: 40.45%

No: 59.55%

Italian constitutional referendum Resuts Exit Polls Live 2016

  1. Italian PM says he takes full responsibility and would resign
  2. IPR exit poll results show gap growing even more. No = 59.1 Yes = 40.9
  3. Polling Agency Yes NO
    IPR: 41 59
    SKY: 43 57
    TECNE: 42 58
    EMG: 43 57
  4. Latest Exit Polls say NO ahead with 55% vs YES 45%
  5. The Interior Ministry's website put the voter turnout at 68.33 per cent, indicating that the final turn out could be more than 70 per cent.
  6. Mr Renzi  is widely expected to resign, but some of his allies have urged him to stay in power regardless of the result.

Italian constitutional referendum Voting Live 2016

  1. Nearly 20 % eligible voters voted by noon – higher turnout than the 2014 European elections.
  2. Voter turnout low across South Italy, where opposition to Mr Renzi’s reforms strongest.
  3. Turnout highest in the north Italy, with Emilia-Romagna, traditionally a bastion of the left.
  4. 51 million Italians are entitled to vote, including 4 million expats.
  5. Polls opened at 7am (0600 GMT) and were scheduled to close at 2200 GMT.
  6. Final results expected by early hours of Monday.
  7. PM Matteo Renzi urged 47 million of eligible voters to say "yes" for constitutional referendum, which is the bellwether of public support for his center-left Democratic Party.
  8. PM Renzi vowed to step down if the vote is negative. Italy's anti-establishment Five Star Movement has been campaigning against prime minister’s constitutional reforms.
  9. Opinion polls indicate high chances of voters voting "NO" and rejecting the referendum.

Italian constitutional referendum Result 2016 Live

Choice Votes %
Yes Yes   0.00%
 No   0.00%
Invalid/blank votes   0.00%
Total   0.00%
Registered voters/turnout   0.00%

Italian constitutional referendum Results by Regions 2016

Region Yes Yes
(votes)
 No
(votes)
Yes Yes
(%)
 No
(%)
Abruzzo        
Aosta Valley        
Apulia        
Basilicata        
Calabria        
Campania        
Emilia-Romagna        
Friuli-Venezia Giulia        
Lazio        
Liguria        
Lombardy        
Marche        
Molise        
Piedmont        
Sardinia        
Sicily        
Tuscany        
Trentino-Alto Adige        
Umbria        
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What are Italians voting on?

 

The vote Sunday is on a constitutional referendum presented by Prime Minister Matteo Renzi that aims to slim down the country’s legislature, speed up lawmaking and attack the bureaucratic morass. Specifically, the overhaul would cut the number of senators by roughly two-thirds to 100, while allowing many bills to be approved by the lower house only. Mr. Renzi has argued that the referendum would give some stability to Italy, which has had 63 governments since the end of World War II.

Critics of the overhaul say the cost-cutting would be far less than what the government is claiming and would give too much power to prime ministers, eliminating important checks and balances.

 Opinion polling for the Italian constitutional referendum 2016

Date Polling Firm Total   Considering only Yes/No vote
YesYes No None / Don't know Lead YesYes No Lead
         
9 Nov 2016 Index Research 37.3 40.7 22.0 3.4 47.8 52.2 4.4
9 Nov 2016 Istituto Ixè 37.0 40.0 23.0 3.0 48.0 52.0 4.0

What are the consequences of a yes vote?

Mr. Renzi and his government would remain in power. In any case, Mr. Renzi has vowed to change a law passed in 2015 that would give the winning party a strong majority through the allocation of “bonus seats.” Elections would most likely be held in 2018, when the current Parliament’s term is scheduled to end.

What are the consequences of a no vote?

Mr. Renzi would most likely resign. If he did, President Sergio Mattarella would consult with the political parties and could decide to form a caretaker government, possibly consisting of technocrats, or call early elections. Mr. Renzi might also choose not to resign, though that appears unlikely, given his statements in recent weeks.

Italian General Election 2018 Results Dates Opinion Poll Candidates Parties Voting Voter List 2018 Exit Polls, Past Italian General election Results, Italian General Elections Results 2018 by party, Italian Cabinet Ministers list, Italian Prime Ministers List, Italian President List, Italian Ministers List 2018

Italian General Election 2018 Results Dates Opinion Poll Candidates Parties Voting Voter List 2018 Exit Polls, Past Italian General election Results, Italian General Elections Results 2018 by party, Italian Cabinet Ministers list, Italian Prime Ministers List, Italian President List, Italian Ministers List 2018

 Italian general election Schedule 2018

The next Italian general election is due to be held no later than 23 May 2018 and will be called following the dissolution or expiry of the term started on 29 April 2013.

After the failure of the constitutional referendum and Prime Minister Matteo Renzi's resignation, it is unclear as to whether an early election will be called by president Sergio Mattarella, or if the election will be held on schedule for May 23rd, 2018.

New electoral system

A new electoral law, known as Italicum, was approved on 4 May 2015.

According to this new system, parties are not allowed to team up or form coalitions. A run-off ballot between the two largest parties decides which party gets a majority bonus , which should make sure the winning party's leader becomes prime minister with a governing majority. The majority bonus is assigned without a run-off only if the largest party reaches 40% in the first round. The country is divided into 20 electoral districts and these are subdivided into a total of 100 constituencies, each electing about 6 deputies. Voters can pick up a party list as well as the candidates, but not the ones at the top  of the slates, who are automatically elected if their party wins a seat in their constituency. Each party must present its list in alternating gender order, and voter preferences must be given to a man and a woman in the interests of gender equity. An amendment, known as the "Erasmus amendment", made sure that Italian students studying abroad via the Erasmus Programme can vote.

Parties and leaders

Party Ideology Leader
  Democratic Party (PD) Social democracy, Christian left Matteo Renzi
  Five Star Movement (M5S) Populism, E-democracy Beppe Grillo
  Forza Italia (FI) Liberal conservatism, Christian democracy Silvio Berlusconi
  Italian Left (SI) Democratic socialism, Social democracy Nicola Fratoianni
  Popular Area (AP) Christian democracy, Social conservatism Angelino Alfano
  Lega Nord (LN) Regionalism, Populism Matteo Salvini
  Brothers of Italy (FdI) National conservatism, Nationalism Giorgia Meloni

Click Here Opinion polling for Italian general election 2018 

In the run-up to the next Italian general election, various organisations have been carrying out opinion polling to gauge voting intention.

Date Polling firm M5S PD FI LN SI FdI AP Others Lead
19–20 Oct SWG 26.5 33.0 12.6 12.0 3.5 3.9 3.1 5.4 6.5
19 Oct Ixè 29.0 32.9 9.8 14.2 4.3 2.5 1.9 5.4 3.9

PD v. M5S

Date Polling firm PD M5S Lead
15–16 Oct 2016 EMG 46.8 53.2 6.4
15 Oct 2016 IPR 48.0 52.0 4.0

PD v. Centre-right

Date Polling firm PD CDx Lead
15–16 Oct 2016 EMG 53.3 46.7 6.6
15 Oct 2016 IPR 53.0 47.0 2.0

M5S v. Centre-right

Date Polling firm M5S CDx Lead
15–16 Oct 2016 EMG 58.3 41.7 16.6
15 Oct 2016 IPR 57.0 43.0 14.0

Three-way race

Date Polling firm PD CDx M5S Lead
15 Oct 2016 IPR 37.0 32.0 31.0 5.0
14–15 Oct 2016 Tecnè 35.0 34.0 31.0 1.0