North Korean parliamentary election 2019 Voting Live

North Korean parliamentary election 2019 Results Voting Live

North Korean parliamentary election Dates 2019

North Korean parliamentary election Date: 10 March 2019 

Elections in North Korea are held every four-to-five years for the Supreme People's Assembly (SPA), the country's national legislature, and every four years for Local People's Assemblies.

All seats are won by the Democratic Front for the Reunification of the Fatherland. The Workers' Party of Korea dominates the Front and holds 87.5% of the seats, with 7.4% for the Korean Social Democratic Party, 3.2% for the Chondoist Chongu Party, and 1.9% for independent deputies.  According to official reports, turnout is near 100%, and approval of the Democratic Front's candidates is unanimous or nearly so.

The parliamentary election in North Korea, creating the 14th Supreme People's Assembly, is scheduled to be held on 10 March 2019.


North Korean parliamentary election Voting Live 2019

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The Electoral system of North Korea

Only one candidate appears on each ballot. Elections are ostensibly conducted by secret ballot, and a voter may cross off the candidate's name to vote against him/her but must do so by crossing out the name without secrecy. Voting is mandatory and turnout is habitually near 100%.

Members of the Supreme People's Assembly are elected to five-year terms and meet for SPA sessions up to ten days per year. The Supreme People's Assembly elects a standing committee known as the Presidium, which exercises legislative functions when the Assembly is not in session. It also elects the Chairman of the National Defence Commission, the country's chief executive, and the Premier.


North Korea Parties and leaders

 

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North Korean past election results 

Alliance Party Votes % Seats
Democratic Front for the 
Reunification of Korea
Workers' Party of Korea   100 607
Korean Social Democratic Party 50
Chondoist Chongu Party 22
General Association of Korean Residents in Japan 5
Religious associations 3
Total   100 687
Registered voters/turnout   99.97

North Korea Demographics Population Religion Percentage by City Immigrants

North Korea Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2019

The demographics of North Korea are known through national censuses and international estimates. The Central BureauNorth Korea Demographics Population Religion Percentage 2017 of Statistics of North Korea conducted the most recent census in 2008, where the population reached 24 million inhabitants. The population density is 199.54 inhabitants per square kilometre, and the 2014 estimated life expectancy is 69.81 years. In 1980, the population rose at a near consistent, but low, rate (0.84% from the two censuses). Since 2000, North Korea's birth rate has exceeded its death rate; the natural growth is positive. In terms of age structure, the population is dominated by the 15–64-year-old segment (68.09%). The median age of the population is 32.9 years, and the gender ratio is 0.95 males to 1.00 female. Nowadays, North Korean women have on average 2 children, against 3 in the early 1980s.

According to The World Factbook, North Korea is racially homogeneous and contains a small Chinese community and a few ethnic Japanese. The 2008 census listed two nationalities: Korean (99.998%) and Other (0.002%). Korea was annexed by the Empire of Japan in 1910, in which the Korean Peninsula was occupied by Japanese. In 1945, when Japan was defeated in World War II, Korea was divided into two occupied zones: North occupied by the Soviet Union and the South by the United States. Negotiations on unification failed, and in 1948 two separate countries were formed: North and South Korea.

North Korea demographics Population by Religion

Religion in North Korea

  Non-religious/atheist

64.30%

  Korean shamanism

16%

  Chondoism

13.50%

  Buddhism

4.50%

  Christianity

1.70%


 North Korea demographics Population by Immigrants

The foreign relations of North Korea are often tense and unpredictable. The number of foreign residents is correspondingly very small, and is essentially limited to Japanese spouses of "repatriating" Zainichi Koreans, expatriates from the People's Republic of China, foreign diplomats, and a few defectors such as James Joseph Dresnok and Joseph T. White.


 

North Korea demographics Population by Race
.

While North Korea is ethnically and linguistically homogeneous, some minorities in North Korea exist. They include groups of repatriated Koreans, small religious communities, and migrants from neighboring China and Japan.

The historical Jaegaseung ethnic group of descendants of Jurchen people used to inhabit villages of their own, under lay monastic orders, until the 1960s. These monastic communities were perceived as antisocialist and the Jaegaseung people were assimilated with the Korean people.

There is a community of ethnic Chinese people, known as huaqiao, that is in decline due to migration to China. While in the 1980s, Chinese people living in North Korea enjoyed privileged access to trips abroad, today many of them chose to seek a better life by permanently settling in China.

Some 50,000-70,000 ethnic Koreans living in China migrated to North Korea in the wake of the famine following Mao Zedong's Great Leap Forward and repression of ethnic minorities during the Cultural Revolution. The influx forced the North Korean government to construct refugee camps to house the immigrants.

North Korea Population by City
.

S.No.

Name

Population

1

Pyongyang 

3,222,000

2

Hamhung

559,056

3

Namp’o 

455,000

4

Sunch’ŏn, South Pyongan

437,000

5

Hŭngnam 

346,082

6

Kaesong 

338,155

7

Wonsan  

329,207

8

Chongjin 

327,000

9

Sariwŏn  

310,100

10

Sinuiju  

288,112